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Thread: roof antenna mount installation?

  1. #21
    Boolit Master Rapier's Avatar
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    After seeing many, many roof mounts ripped off or ripped loose causing leaks by storms, I give a +1 on all antennas or dishes being mounted off the roof on galvanized pipe poles in cement, that extend up above the roof, and are braced on the house. This process is extreamly stable and strong. If that mount gets damaged, you just replace the pole, but you do not replace the roof. Plus thre is never any reduction to the integrity of the roof itself. I have four antennas and dishes at the moment, all are mounted off my roof.
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  2. #22
    Boolit Master



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    Yes!...
    plastic fiber reinforced roof cement
    yes!...
    a very thin coating of roofing mastic on the threads of the lag bolts, and also pre-drill the holes
    Death to every foe and traitor and hurrah, my boys, for freedom !

  3. #23
    Boolit Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rapier View Post
    After seeing many, many roof mounts ripped off or ripped loose causing leaks by storms, I give a +1 on all antennas or dishes being mounted off the roof on galvanized pipe poles in cement, that extend up above the roof, and are braced on the house. This process is extreamly stable and strong. If that mount gets damaged, you just replace the pole, but you do not replace the roof. Plus thre is never any reduction to the integrity of the roof itself. I have four antennas and dishes at the moment, all are mounted off my roof.
    Good for you.

    You probably missed it, but the photo I posted was part of a discussion of how best to install a roof mount tripod, and specifically the use of pitch pads on the feet.

    The photo I posted was of an installation that used a roof mount tripod, as well as pitch pads, and which has survived multiple 90+ mph wind storms and 12 years of Alaskan winters.

    I've also seen a number of commercial and military tower installations with compromised concrete, and inadequate guy cabling. Those also never compromised the integrity of any roofs.

    I give a +1 to all antennas that are properly installed, regardless of where they're installed.

  4. #24
    Boolit Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by deces View Post
    The only way I would ever mount a dish on a house.
    Attachment 327330
    In this photo you show a satellite dish mount on the fascia of a roof.

    Fascia panels on a pitched roof are not structure. They're typically 1x4" or 1x6" pine boards. Any significant wind, and that dish will get ripped out of the fascia panel.

    That's about the single worst way to mount any antenna.
    Last edited by AlaskaMike; 06-23-2024 at 07:24 AM.

  5. #25
    Boolit Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaMike View Post
    In this photo you show a satellite dish mount on the fascia of a roof.

    Fascia panels on a pitched roof are not structure. They're typically 1x4" or 1x6" pine boards. Any significant wind, and that dish will get ripped out of the fascia panel.

    That's about the single worst way to mount any antenna.
    In my area and further south, we have subfascia that the fascia is nailed to. It's nailed in place to the rafter tails, look out blocks and the roof sheathing is nailed to it. Keeps the roof edge from turning to a potato chip when the big wind blows. It's also got the soffit nailed to it too. The fascia or rake boards are just a cover to hide all those end grains from the weather. If you use a 1x8 than the subfascia will be a 2x6. It's thought to be better than putting a hole in your roof intentionally.

  6. #26
    Boolit Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by jsizemore View Post
    In my area and further south, we have subfascia that the fascia is nailed to. It's nailed in place to the rafter tails, look out blocks and the roof sheathing is nailed to it. Keeps the roof edge from turning to a potato chip when the big wind blows. It's also got the soffit nailed to it too. The fascia or rake boards are just a cover to hide all those end grains from the weather. If you use a 1x8 than the subfascia will be a 2x6. It's thought to be better than putting a hole in your roof intentionally.
    Yep, I actually worked as a roofer for several years before I got into radio. As you and I both mention, the fascia boards are not structure--they're just a cover. It kills me because I see antennas mounted on fascia boards all the time.

    The fear of putting a hole in the roof is where you and I might depart. I've made roof penetrations many times, both for commercial (flat and shallow pitched roofs) as well as residential roofs. Not one has resulted in leaks.

    And at this point we go back to Mary's mention of pitch pads, and my photo of one of them earlier which has survived for 12+ years and is still malleable and no leaks.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Roof mounts work fine.
    Last edited by AlaskaMike; 06-25-2024 at 02:55 AM.

  7. #27
    Boolit Master
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    I build to the Dade County 175 mph standard. I work on stuff from Blowing Rock to Kitty Hawk.
    Last edited by jsizemore; 06-25-2024 at 12:38 PM.

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