Inline FabricationRepackboxWidenersTitan Reloading
MidSouth Shooters Supply

Results 1 to 19 of 19

Thread: Heavily oxidized lead

  1. #1
    Boolit Buddy
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    310

    Heavily oxidized lead

    I shoveled up as much lead spatter from behind our pin table as I could carry. The flakes of lead are all white. When I melt this, what will happen to the lead oxide? Will it mix back into the melt, or will it get fluxed off with the dross?

  2. #2
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    3,026
    not sure what a pin table is. but the only way to know for sure is to make sure its all dry, put it in a pot and heat it up to melting. be sure to wear proper safety protection garb. if it melts together flux with some dry sawdust and scoop the dross off the top.

  3. #3
    Boolit Buddy
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    310
    Pin table = a metal table where you stand up bowling pins then kill them with a handgun before they can kill you. Ours has a slanted sheet of metal behind it. The boolits ricochet off the metal plate then pile up in a layer on the ground.
    Yes, the lead is wet. That's why it oxidizes so badly.

  4. #4
    Boolit Grand Master

    Winger Ed.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Just outside Gun Barrel City, Texas
    Posts
    7,484
    The oxidation will float up with the dirt and other trash.
    Stir the pot like it owes you money.
    Skim it off, and it's gone.
    Last edited by Winger Ed.; 11-25-2022 at 03:04 PM.
    In school: We learn lessons, and are given tests.
    In life: We are given tests, and learn lessons.


    OK People. Enough of this idle chit-chat.
    This ain't your Grandma's sewing circle.
    EVERYONE!
    Back to your oars. The Captain wants to waterski.

  5. #5
    Boolit Master BNE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    SC
    Posts
    1,145
    Put them into a cold pot. Cover the top of the lead with sawdust and then heat it up. Keeping the oxidized lead covered with sawdust ash, will reduce a lot of that oxide back to lead. Once you have a melt, stir the lead, scrape off the ash and pour your ingots.

    BNE

    PS - You may want to do this outside!!
    I'm a Happy Clinger.

  6. #6
    Boolit Grand Master

    gwpercle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Baton Rouge, Louisiana
    Posts
    8,612
    Sometimes the white oxidized lead acts like it doesn't want to melt ...
    white boolits will float ... add heat or knock some of the white oxidation off ... it will eventually melt and the white oxide will float on the melt surface and be removed when fluxed and skimmed .
    Gary
    Certified Cajun
    Proud Member of The Basket of Deplorables
    " Let's Go Brandon !"

  7. #7
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Feb 2021
    Posts
    519
    Maybe lots of flaming sawdust and wax? Would the fire consume the oxygen part of the lead-oxide?
    Take my advice last… I’m still learning.

  8. #8
    Boolit Grand Master uscra112's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Switzerland of Ohio
    Posts
    5,580
    The purpose of any flux is to grab the oxygen, letting the pure metal go back into the melt. Lots of sawdust and rancid bacon grease would be my choice.
    Cognitive Dissident

  9. #9
    Boolit Master Rapier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2020
    Location
    NW Florida
    Posts
    716
    I would run my alloy 100# pot up to a high temperature so the unknowns have a better chance to mix, plus allow the sand to go to the bottom as you stir. You really have no idea what folks have used to make their bullets. I prefer a commercial powder flux. when making alloy. Give the mix a liberal dose or three.
    “There is a remedy for all things, save death.“
    Cervantes

    “Never give up, never quit.”
    Robert Rogers
    Roger’s Rangers

    There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.
    Will Rogers

  10. #10
    Boolit Grand Master

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    England,Ar
    Posts
    7,441
    Like the others have said, flux it a few times and skim off whats left floating on top. I've melted wet lead a few times. Just put it in the pot and then light the burner. Do not add wet lead (or any lead) to a pot that already has molten lead in it. Also do this outside and try to stay upwind. You don't need to breath that white stuff.

  11. #11
    Boolit Grand Master uscra112's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Switzerland of Ohio
    Posts
    5,580
    Um, sand won't go to the bottom of a pot of molten lead.
    Cognitive Dissident

  12. #12
    Boolit Grand Master

    Winger Ed.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Just outside Gun Barrel City, Texas
    Posts
    7,484
    Quote Originally Posted by justindad View Post
    Would the fire consume the oxygen part of the lead-oxide?
    Good question. I only got 'B's and 'C's in High School Chemistry, but I'd guess, 'probably not'.

    I don't think the oxygen would come out of the Lead Oxide any better than using fire to get the oxygen out of water,
    burning rust gives back pure Iron, or burning salt would separate out the Sodium from the Chlorine.
    Last edited by Winger Ed.; 11-26-2022 at 05:26 PM.
    In school: We learn lessons, and are given tests.
    In life: We are given tests, and learn lessons.


    OK People. Enough of this idle chit-chat.
    This ain't your Grandma's sewing circle.
    EVERYONE!
    Back to your oars. The Captain wants to waterski.

  13. #13
    Boolit Buddy
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    310
    Thanks for the help. I'm going to melt it with my turkey fryer when the wind is blowing over the field behind my house and not towards the yard. I'll make sure and use the sawdust flux.

  14. #14
    Boolit Grand Master uscra112's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Switzerland of Ohio
    Posts
    5,580
    And stir it in vigorously. For the flux to work, it has to be mixed in with the lead. Fire on the surface takes its' oxygen from the air, which does you no good at all.
    Cognitive Dissident

  15. #15
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Location
    Communist New Jersey
    Posts
    572
    Quote Originally Posted by Winger Ed. View Post
    Good question. I only got 'B's and 'C's in High School Chemistry, but I'd guess, 'probably not'.

    I don't think the oxygen would come out of the Lead Oxide any better than using fire to get the oxygen out of water,
    burning rust gives back pure Iron, or burning salt would separate out the Sodium from the Chlorine.
    Um, fire mixed with water produces hydrogen and oxygen, so yes, fire does "get" oxygen out of water. Burning rust with a torch will definitely show that what little bit of steel that is left in the iron oxide does return to it's original form, which liberates the oxygen in the oxides and salt, well, I would have to revisit my chemistry and physics books for that one. But 99% of the time heat will break down an oxide, or most any chemical, into it's base elements under the right conditions. Mainly the amount of heat needed.

  16. #16
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    1,004
    Has anyone tried melting heavily oxidized lead (PbO), then fluxing with candle wax or a similar paraffin? Based on heats of formation, the reaction should go forward, readily.
    The hydrogen-rich paraffins would combine with carbon to form CO2 and water, which leave on formation, leaving metallic lead (Pb) in the molten solution. Just wondering if the relatively contaminant-free paraffins might be an advantage over sawdust, in the reduction process.
    For in much wisdom is much grief: and he that increaseth knowledge increaseth sorrow. Ecclesiastes 1:18
    He that troubleth his own house shall inherit the wind: and the fool become servant to the wise of heart. Proverbs 11:29
    ...Verily I say unto you, Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of my brethren, ye have done it unto me. Matthew 25:40


    Carpe SCOTCH!

  17. #17
    Boolit Grand Master uscra112's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Switzerland of Ohio
    Posts
    5,580
    Good point - the more hydrogen in the flux the better. I think the sawdust idea is to keep air away, so that the flux isn't being used up combining with ambient oxygen.
    Cognitive Dissident

  18. #18
    Boolit Master

    dale2242's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    SW Oregon
    Posts
    2,324
    When I flux, I cover the top of the alloy with pine planer shavings and add some candle wax and ignite it.
    You get the best of both worlds that way.
    It has worked fine for me.

  19. #19
    Boolit Master 243winxb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    2,584
    Quote Originally Posted by gwpercle View Post
    Sometimes the white oxidized lead acts like it doesn't want to melt ...
    white boolits will float ... add heat or knock some of the white oxidation off ... it will eventually melt and the white oxide will float on the melt surface and be removed when fluxed and skimmed .
    Gary
    This. I had to scrap off part of the oxide/dirt to get plates to melt.

    Last edited by 243winxb; 11-27-2022 at 02:20 PM. Reason: Add photos
    This message is hidden because megasupermagnum is on your ignore list.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check