RepackboxWidenersInline FabricationMidSouth Shooters Supply

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 25

Thread: Smith model 10-5

  1. #1
    Boolit Master



    Dieselhorses's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Southeast Louisiana
    Posts
    1,291

    Smith model 10-5

    Wanted to verify what "era" the 10-5 was made. C67XXXX. I had a file on my PC with some earlier dates-said between 1954-56? Does that sound right?


    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_1522.JPG 
Views:	34 
Size:	88.8 KB 
ID:	307106
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_3801.jpg 
Views:	34 
Size:	92.9 KB 
ID:	307104   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_3796.jpg 
Views:	27 
Size:	84.5 KB 
ID:	307105  
    The unexamined life is not worth living....Socrates
    Pain, is just weakness leaving the body....USMC
    Fast is fine, but accuracy is FINAL!....Wyatt Earp

  2. #2
    Boolit Grand Master
    rintinglen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Orange, VA NOW
    Posts
    5,902
    1963-1965, per the Standard Catalog of Smith and Wesson.

    Looks like you have a good, old service revolver and can expect many years of good use out of it.
    _________________________________________________It's not that I can't spell: it is that I can't type.

  3. #3
    Boolit Master armoredman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Casa Grande, AZ
    Posts
    1,558
    I had a 10-5 YEARS ago, highly regret letting it go. Very nice, sir.

  4. #4
    Boolit Grand Master

    stubshaft's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Southernmost State of the Union
    Posts
    5,312
    I'd have to agree on the 63-65 dates, the 50's were a little too early for a -5 series.
    Old enough to know better, young enough to do it anyway!

    When the only tool you have is a hammer, every problem is a nail.

  5. #5
    Boolit Buddy eastbank's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Posts
    202
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN0124 (2).jpg 
Views:	18 
Size:	65.6 KB 
ID:	307115, my 10-5 has been a fine revolver. I carry it as a woods walking revolver in a shoulder holster.

  6. #6
    Boolit Master



    Dieselhorses's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Southeast Louisiana
    Posts
    1,291
    I have to agree guys, it is fun to shoot and surprisingly miniscule creep in cylinder. So, I attached the Word doc-if any or all of this info is "bogus" please let me know. I'm trying to find a reasonable S&W book/guide as we speak. What is the latest edition?

    Post-War S Series N frames:
    S62,489 – S67,999……..1946 - Early 1947
    S68,000 – S71,999……….Late 1947 – Early 1948
    S72,000 – S72,499……….Late 1948 - Early 1949
    S72,500 – S74,999……….Late 1949 – Early 1950
    S75,000 – S80,499……….Late 1950 – Early 1951
    S80,500 – S85,999……….Late 1952 – Early 1952
    S86,000 – S94,999…….…Late 1952 – Early 1953
    S95,000 – S102,999…….Late 1953 – Early 1954
    S103,000 – S139,999……Late 1954 – Early 1955*
    S140,000 – S149,999….Late 1955 – Early 1956
    S150,000 – S175,999……Late 1956 – Early 1957
    S176,000 – S181,999……Late 1957 – Early 1958
    S182,000 – S194,499……Late 1958 – Early 1959
    S194,500 – S206.999……Late 1959 – Early 1960
    S207,000 – S219,999……Late 1960 – Early 1961
    S220,000 – S227,999……Late 1961 – Early 1962
    S228,000 – S231,999……Late 1962 – Early 1963
    S232,000 – S235.999……Late 1963 – Early 1964
    S236,000 – S257,999……Late 1964 – Early 1965
    S258,000 – S261,999……Late 1965 – Early 1966
    S262,000 – S289,999……Late 1966 – Early 1967
    S290,000 – S304,999……Late 1967 – Early 1968
    S305,000 – S329,999……Late 1968 – Early 1969
    S330,000 – S333,454……Late 1969 – Early 1970
    N Series N Frames:
    N1 – N60,000………….......1970-72
    N60,001 – N 190,000…...1972-74
    N190,001 – N430,000…...1975 – 77
    N430.001 – N 550,000…..1978
    N550,001 – N580,000….. 1979
    N580,001 – N790,000…...1980
    N790,001 – N932,999...…1980-83
    Post-War S Series K Frames:
    S811,120 – S999,999…….1946 – 48
    C Series K Frames: (Fixed Sight Models)
    C1 - C233,999………….....1948 – 52
    C236,004 – C261,483…….1953
    C277,555 – C314,031….…1954 – 56
    C402,924 – C405,018…….1957
    C405,019 – C429,740…..1958 – 59
    C429,741 – C474,148…….1960
    C474,149 – C622,699…….1961 – 62
    C622,700 – C810,532…….1963 – 65
    C810,533 – C999,999…..1966 – 67
    D Series K Frames: (Fixed Sight Models)
    D1 – D90,000…………….....1968
    D90,001 – D330,000……..1969 -70
    D330,001 – D420,000………1971 – Early 72
    D420,001 – D510,000………Late 1972 – Early 73
    D510,001 – D659,901………Late 1973 – Early 1974
    D659.902 – D75000………..Late 1974 – Early 1975
    D750,001 – D870,000………Late 1975 – Early 1976
    D870,001 – D999,999………Late 1976 – Early 1977
    2D00001 - 2D80,000……….1977
    2D80,001 – 2D99,999………1978
    4D00001 – 6D10,000……….1979
    6D10,0001 – 7D10,000……1980
    7D10,001 – 9D44,500…..1981
    9D44,501 – 17D8,900………1982
    17D8,901 – 21D0883……….1983
    K Series K Frames (Adjustable Sight Models)
    K101 – K614……………......1946
    K615 – K18,731…………....1947
    K18,732 – K73,121……..…1948
    K73,122 – K84,149……..…1949
    K84,150 – K104,047…...1950
    K104,048 – K136,690...1951
    K136,691 – K175,637...1952
    K175,638 – K210,095...1953
    K210,096 – K231,255...1954
    K231,256 – K266,154...1955
    K266,155 – K288,988...1956
    K288,989 – K317,822...1957
    K317,823 – K350,547...1958
    K350,548 – K386,804...1959
    K386,805 – K429,894...1960
    K429,895 – K468,098...1961
    K468,099 – K515,478...1962
    K515,479 – K553,999....1963
    K555,000 – K605.877....1964
    K605,878 – K658.986....1965
    K658,987 – K715,996....1966
    K715,997 – K779.162....1967
    K779,163 – K848,781....1968
    K848,782 – K946,391....1969
    K946,382 – K999,999....1970
    1K1 – 1K39,500.........1970
    2K1 – 2K22.037.........1970
    1K39,501 – 1K999,999...1971
    2K22,038 – 2K55,996....1971
    3K1 – 3K73,962.........1971
    2K55,997 – 2K99,999....1972
    3K31,280 – 5K6,616.....1972
    4K1 – 4K1,627..........1972
    4K1,628 – 4K54,104.....1973
    5K6,617 – 5K73,962.....1973
    4K54,105 – 4K99,999....1974
    5K73,963 – 6K58,917....1974
    7K1 – 7K26,043.........1974
    7K26,044 – 7K70,577....1975
    6K98,918 – 8K20,763....1975
    8K20,764 – 9K1.........1975
    8K20,000 – 9K100,000...1975
    9K1,001 – 9K99,999.....1976
    10K001 – 24K9,999......1977
    25K001 – 56K9,999......1978 – 79
    57K001 – 91K6,800......1980
    91K6,801 – 124K000.....1981
    125K000 – 269K9,999....1982
    270K000 – 311K273......1983
    1980 Three-Letter Prefix Series Begins at AAA000
    The unexamined life is not worth living....Socrates
    Pain, is just weakness leaving the body....USMC
    Fast is fine, but accuracy is FINAL!....Wyatt Earp

  7. #7
    Boolit Grand Master FergusonTO35's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Boonesborough, KY
    Posts
    5,937
    I got it's 1967 sibling, great wheelguns!
    Currently casting and loading: .32 Auto, .380 Auto, .38 Special, 9X19, .357 Magnum, .257 Roberts, 6.5 Creedmoor, .30 WCF, .308 WCF.

  8. #8
    Boolit Master



    Dieselhorses's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Southeast Louisiana
    Posts
    1,291
    Quote Originally Posted by FergusonTO35 View Post
    I got it's 1967 sibling, great wheelguns!
    Nice! I wonder what they changed from one number to next (10-5, 10-6 etc)
    The unexamined life is not worth living....Socrates
    Pain, is just weakness leaving the body....USMC
    Fast is fine, but accuracy is FINAL!....Wyatt Earp

  9. #9
    Moderator


    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Way up in the Cascades
    Posts
    6,990
    Books: History of Smith & Wesson, Roy G. Jinks, Beinfeld.
    Standard Catalog of Smith & Wesson, Jim Supica and Richard Nahas, Krause Publications.

    Standard Catalog serial numbers list places your revolver in the 1963-1965 range, and judging by the spread I'd guess 1st half of 1964.

    10-6 says "Triggerguard screw eliminated on heavy barrel model.

    DG

  10. #10
    Boolit Grand Master
    rintinglen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Orange, VA NOW
    Posts
    5,902
    Each "Dash" represents an engineering change, some pretty noticeable, ie 4 screw to 3 screw changed 10-2 to 10-4 pencil barrel, Model 10 becomes 10-1 when Heavy Barrel model began. Others were somewhat obscure.

    For example, 10-2, change threads on extractor rod from right hand to left hand on pencil barrel, but 10-3 is exactly the same thing, only on heavy barrel guns. To make matters worse, more than a few were mis-marked as older frames were used up, Heavy barrels on 10-5 or 10-7 guns, pencil barrels on 10-6 or 10-8, etc. From an end-user stand point, not much difference. They all rotate counter-clockwise, shoot 38 specials, save for a very few made in 357 magnum for the NYSP and gave sterling service for many years.

    And in my view, you can search high and low but you will be hard pressed to find a better gun for the non-dedicated user.
    _________________________________________________It's not that I can't spell: it is that I can't type.

  11. #11
    Boolit Master



    Dieselhorses's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Southeast Louisiana
    Posts
    1,291
    Quote Originally Posted by rintinglen View Post
    Each "Dash" represents an engineering change, some pretty noticeable, ie 4 screw to 3 screw changed 10-2 to 10-4 pencil barrel, Model 10 becomes 10-1 when Heavy Barrel model began. Others were somewhat obscure.

    For example, 10-2, change threads on extractor rod from right hand to left hand on pencil barrel, but 10-3 is exactly the same thing, only on heavy barrel guns. To make matters worse, more than a few were mis-marked as older frames were used up, Heavy barrels on 10-5 or 10-7 guns, pencil barrels on 10-6 or 10-8, etc. From an end-user stand point, not much difference. They all rotate counter-clockwise, shoot 38 specials, save for a very few made in 357 magnum for the NYSP and gave sterling service for many years.

    And in my view, you can search high and low but you will be hard pressed to find a better gun for the non-dedicated user.
    So, a tapered barrel isn't necessarily a "pencil barrel"? I read on S&W forum that around 6 million of these were made. I wonder what it's worth.
    The unexamined life is not worth living....Socrates
    Pain, is just weakness leaving the body....USMC
    Fast is fine, but accuracy is FINAL!....Wyatt Earp

  12. #12
    Moderator


    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Way up in the Cascades
    Posts
    6,990
    As far as I know a pencil barrel and a tapered barrel are one and the same. Always willing to learn, so if that isn't so, please provide a reference.

    DG

  13. #13
    Boolit Master



    Dieselhorses's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Southeast Louisiana
    Posts
    1,291
    I can humbly say - I don't think I could surpass many of you all's knowledge when it comes to S&W's.
    The unexamined life is not worth living....Socrates
    Pain, is just weakness leaving the body....USMC
    Fast is fine, but accuracy is FINAL!....Wyatt Earp

  14. #14
    Boolit Grand Master
    rintinglen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Orange, VA NOW
    Posts
    5,902
    Re Value:
    That varies from place to place and especially on condition, though condition on these is less important than on some others, unless absolutely mint. Most people shopping for one just want a shooter.

    Around here, a 4" will sell pretty fast in the 350-400 dollar range, if in good mechanical condition. They set on the shelf at 550 and gather dust. Now, a particularly choice example, especially if it has the original box and paperwork, can go for several hundred bucks more, but that's not what you have. Curiously, a 6 inch might run a little bit more than a comparable 4 or 5 inch, while a 2 inch is going to run 50-100 bucks more, all else being equal.
    _________________________________________________It's not that I can't spell: it is that I can't type.

  15. #15
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Central NH
    Posts
    658
    Barney Fyfe vintage. Remember to keep a round in your shirt pocket!

  16. #16
    Boolit Grand Master Char-Gar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Deep South Texas
    Posts
    12,774
    No home is complete without a Pencil Barrel Model 10. Mine is a 1960 vintage.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	S&W 10-2 (640x316).jpg 
Views:	21 
Size:	162.4 KB 
ID:	307758  
    Disclaimer: The above is not holy writ. It is just my opinion based on my experience and knowledge. Your mileage may vary.

  17. #17
    Boolit Master



    Dieselhorses's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Southeast Louisiana
    Posts
    1,291
    Quote Originally Posted by Char-Gar View Post
    No home is complete without a Pencil Barrel Model 10. Mine is a 1960 vintage.
    Nice! Are those the original grips?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    The unexamined life is not worth living....Socrates
    Pain, is just weakness leaving the body....USMC
    Fast is fine, but accuracy is FINAL!....Wyatt Earp

  18. #18
    Boolit Buddy
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    455
    They look like Skeeter Skelton Bear Hug grips

  19. #19
    Boolit Buddy
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    394
    I've got a model 10 no dash and a model 36 no dash that have been my EDC guns for over 30 years. Both are getting fairly blue worn but are mechanically excellent, shoot to point of aim with my reloads, and have my full confidence that they will work every time I pull the trigger. A good friend of mine almost cries every time it comes up in conversation that I'm carrying 2 no dash "collector's" guns. I'm using them for their intended purpose and will still own them when I die, so 'resale' value has no meaning on those two.

  20. #20
    Boolit Master



    Dieselhorses's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Southeast Louisiana
    Posts
    1,291
    Quote Originally Posted by curiousgeorge View Post
    I've got a model 10 no dash and a model 36 no dash that have been my EDC guns for over 30 years. Both are getting fairly blue worn but are mechanically excellent, shoot to point of aim with my reloads, and have my full confidence that they will work every time I pull the trigger. A good friend of mine almost cries every time it comes up in conversation that I'm carrying 2 no dash "collector's" guns. I'm using them for their intended purpose and will still own them when I die, so 'resale' value has no meaning on those two.
    I know where you coming from. I have a few other SW pistols that I wouldn’t know where to start if I absolutely had to sell.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    The unexamined life is not worth living....Socrates
    Pain, is just weakness leaving the body....USMC
    Fast is fine, but accuracy is FINAL!....Wyatt Earp

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check