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Thread: brakes

  1. #21
    Boolit Buddy kfd518's Avatar
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    This is why it’s recommended to flush the system. This can be done by gravity, vacuum, pressure.
    , two man system. Last time I did it on my ram it took me 45 min from start to finish to flush them all. If you are having to replace a wheel cylinder to make bleeding necessary crack the other side to let it start while you go about your business repairing the other side check the tubing periodically and close then move to another of you see clear fluid before you finish what you are doing with replacement. Efficiency of work should be the name of the game
    In anything you undertake. Don’t underestimate the value of your time it is a finite number.

  2. #22
    Boolit Master


    GregLaROCHE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by megasupermagnum View Post
    It would definitely work, but it isn't something you want to do. I'm surprised you are allowed to do it on aircraft. If you are working on a car or truck, you are certainly working on a used brake system. The systems build up little bits of dirt and rubber inside, and worst of all your brake fluid is hydroscopic. DOT 3/4 brake fluid is only good for a couple of years. Despite that, there are people who run it until something fails. Getting that old fluid out is almost more important than getting the air out. In the racing world, a lot of people bleed brakes with fresh fluid every single race. I'm guessing airplanes don't get their brakes hammered on nearly as much, so maybe they can run a different kind of fluid that handles different conditions. Do they use DOT 5?
    In my experience with aircraft. The old fluid was drained out and what I mentioned was adding all the new fluid to the system from the bottom. They didnít hold that much volume. I canít remember the specs for the fluid, but it definitely wasnít the same as used with cars and trucks. It was bright red. Once an employee found some in my shop and added it to a Ford truck. Within a week the whole system was wiped out and had to be completely overhauled.

  3. #23
    Boolit Master


    Finster101's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GregLaROCHE View Post
    In my experience with aircraft. The old fluid was drained out and what I mentioned was adding all the new fluid to the system from the bottom. They didn’t hold that much volume. I can’t remember the specs for the fluid, but it definitely wasn’t the same as used with cars and trucks. It was bright red. Once an employee found some in my shop and added it to a Ford truck. Within a week the whole system was wiped out and had to be completely overhauled.
    That would be Dot 5 silicon fluid most likely. It is not at all compatible with Dot 3 or 4.

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Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check