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Thread: Wow!!!!!

  1. #21
    Boolit Buddy
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    Poured down here about 2 miles South of me. Sprinkled at the house enough to get my truck windshield dirty, but that was about it. Been awhile since one of those thunderstorms came over us.

  2. #22
    Boolit Master
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    Used be a local weatherman here in SA named Dow Sherry. His forecast every night during summer was, ďHot and dustyÖ!Ē

  3. #23
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    Idaho45guy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaryB View Post
    How many of our ancestors died early from the stresses of extreme heat? When my dad's side of the family came to MN they built a sod hut into the hillside and broke 160 acres of virgin prairie to start a farm. This part of MN sees 100f+ in summer with humidity hitting 90+%... miserable and they worked in it! They did dam the spring and had a 60 degree swimming hole to jump in to cool off now and then...
    More than likely, the humidity levels were much lower back then. Why? Because there were less acres of crops planted.

    Corn sweat is a real thing in Iowa and Minnesota. An acre of corn will put an extra 4000 gallons of water in the air every day.

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/weath...tion/87442376/
    "Luck don't live out here. Wolves don't kill the unlucky deer; they kill the weak ones..." Jeremy Renner in Wind River

  4. #24
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    Found a link that confirms my hypothesis...

    https://glisa.umich.edu/media/files/...Historical.pdf

    The search for trends of humidity is complicated by the
    relative lack of quality observations and past changes in
    sensor technology. Most existing studies suggest that
    humidity levels across the Midwest have increased in recent
    decades. For example, Gaffen and Ross (1999) reported
    positive trends of both relative and specific humidity across
    the USA, although the relative humidity trends were weaker
    than specific humidity trends. Dai (2006) found relatively
    large changes of 0.5-2.0% per decade in surface relative
    humidity observations from 1976 to 2004 across the
    central USA while Changnon et al. (2006) reported a steady
    increase of the frequency of high dew point days during the
    period 1960-2000. In a very recent study, Schoof (2012)
    found increases in maximum dew point temperatures
    during the summer season across the Midwest which
    partially offset flat or decreasing maximum air
    temperatures and a wide variance in trends of resulting
    apparent temperatures. A likely cause of higher dew point
    temperatures during the growing season is the significant
    increase in plant density from earlier decades, which
    greatly enhances the transpiration of water from the soil to
    the atmosphere (Changnon et al. 2003).
    "Luck don't live out here. Wolves don't kill the unlucky deer; they kill the weak ones..." Jeremy Renner in Wind River

  5. #25
    Boolit Buddy
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    Dang 25 people just died to flooding where Iím fromÖ.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Idaho45guy View Post
    More than likely, the humidity levels were much lower back then. Why? Because there were less acres of crops planted.

    Corn sweat is a real thing in Iowa and Minnesota. An acre of corn will put an extra 4000 gallons of water in the air every day.

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/weath...tion/87442376/
    Absolutely! People in both northwest and southeast New Mexico are complaining about the humidity. It’s hitting 40%-45% where it was 15%-20% before pivot irrigation was introduced. Yeah, I know. Lots of us would love to have that kind of humidity but that is truly man made climate change and the tree huggers don’t even want to acknowledge it.

    A single pivot irrigation system can consume 400 gallons of water per minute. They’re sucking the aquifer dry in SE New Mexico and West Texas.

    I had a minor problem with the condensate pump on the mini split in my reloading room today. In the process of fixing it I realized that it was making about a gallon of water per hour for an area equal to a 12’x14’ room with an 8’ ceiling. It’s tight and well insulated. Just can’t escape the humidity.
    Sometimes life taps you on the shoulder and reminds you it's a one way street. Jim Morris

  7. #27
    Boolit Master bedbugbilly's Avatar
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    I read something the other day where it has been literally POURING in places like Washington, Oregon, Kalifornia, Illinois, New York, Washington DC and a couple other places . . . then I read the article more closely . . . . when the author said it was POURING . . . . he was talking about MANURE . . . . NOT "rain".

  8. #28
    Boolit Master Thumbcocker's Avatar
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    I will give up my air conditioning when they pry my cold dead fingers off the thermostat.
    You'll go far providin' you ain't burnt alive or scalped."

    Will Geer as Bear Claw in "Jeramiah Johnson"

  9. #29
    Boolit Master Handloader109's Avatar
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    Yes, most of us really can live without AC. Those of us who live or have lived in the deep south don't want to, and it does alter your work habits. Oh, and while you can work on a hot roof putting shingles on when it is 100f very few will and those that do aren't 60 years old either. Young man's job. Humidity is the key, and which is why you won't see a swamp cooler in the south. Yeah, that shirt ain't drying till you take it off.
    Sleeping at 80f in MS with a box fan at night is something I don't plan on doing again. The foolish writer cut her ac off any time she wants. Get near mine and it's trouble. And yep, unplug that car, and computer and all those electric appliances. Go back to the stone age.

    Sent from my SM-S908U using Tapatalk

  10. #30
    Boolit Grand Master

    jonp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hoodat View Post
    There's plenty of us who have to work in this heat, get the job done, and -- not die. My favorite personal cooling device is a light cotton shirt. Soak with water, put it on, wear till dry -- repeat.

    We've been hitting 100 degrees every day for awhile now, and out on the asphalt it's prolly more like 120. My eyes are gonna get stuck in "permanent roll" position if I listen to more people who work in the AC building, whining about the heat.

    I drive delivery truck, short haul, mostly to residential construction. My day consists of building my loads, loading my truck, driving to job sites, and unloading my truck with either a truck mounted crane or piggy-back fork lift. About a third of my day is spent behind the wheel enjoying the AC.

    The guys I deliver to, (framers, roofers, dry-wallers,) they don't get to spend much time in the AC. I haven't seen any of em drop dead lately, although they've got good reason to. jd
    Try those cool cloth gators or towels around your neck. Soak in water, stretch or snap and put on. Cools the blood going to your brain and are amazing in how well they work
    I Am Descended From Men Who Would Not Be Ruled

    It is not with strength one will prevail; those who oppose The Lord will be broken

  11. #31
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    David2011's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonp View Post
    Try those cool cloth gators or towels around your neck. Soak in water, stretch or snap and put on. Cools the blood going to your brain and are amazing in how well they work
    Those require at least some evaporation to work. I have one. It works great in low humidity, cooling as the water evaporates. In high humidity it warms up to the ambient temperature and stays warm and wet.
    Sometimes life taps you on the shoulder and reminds you it's a one way street. Jim Morris

  12. #32
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    MaryB's Avatar
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    98 yesterday with 60% humidity... no evaporative cooler can handle that! I watered garden(I do it by hand to conserve water, just put it on the plants that need it) yesterday and my tank top was saked with sweat within 5 minutes of going outside. It was NOT evaporating... cooled down today, 78 but 62% still so muggy.

  13. #33
    Boolit Grand Master popper's Avatar
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    https://phys.org/news/2020-09-qa-mul...world-air.html Complete BS!
    Even the indians (native) lived in mud huts to keep cool and MOVED to cooler locations when possible. Mormans went across the 'desert' of Ks in summer, using hand carts. 1/2 didn't survive. Only reason for Sante Fe trail was to connect to lower Ca. and Mexico. ost natives were moved to the plains states by the Gov., from cooler eastern states.
    Whatever!

  14. #34
    Moderator Emeritus / Trusted loob groove dealer

    waksupi's Avatar
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    We could use some rain. Elmo II fires is ten miles south, and headed this way. Windy day, to boot.
    The solid soft lead bullet is undoubtably the best and most satisfactory expanding bullet that has ever been designed. It invariably mushrooms perfectly, and never breaks up. With the metal base that is essential for velocities of 2000 f.s. and upwards to protect the naked base, these metal-based soft lead bullets are splendid.
    John Taylor - "African Rifles and Cartridges"

    Forget everything you know about loading jacketed bullets. This is a whole new ball game!


  15. #35
    Boolit Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by waksupi View Post
    We could use some rain. Elmo II fires is ten miles south, and headed this way. Windy day, to boot.
    Yeah, we are starting to burn up, too. In 2011, I could go home in the afternoon after work and could see smoke in any direction. Looks like we are headed that way again - weatherman says we are about 25" behind on rainfall. The grass starts like gasoline - pretty much any spark can set it off.

  16. #36
    Boolit Master
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    A drought with a heat wave can really get on one's nerves after a few weeks. We have had a mild summer so far with frequent rain. Cools off nicely at night so sleeping has been good. With our long, cold Winters we deserve nice summer weather.
    "If everyone is thinking the same thing it means someone is not thinking"

    "A rat became the unit of currency"

  17. #37
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    GregLaROCHE's Avatar
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    It’s been hot here in southern France for the last couple of weeks too. Hitting 100*F most mid afternoons. Our parries are all brown. We need to feed winter hay to get through these weeks. It’s not unusual for the end of July and the beginning of August to be this way. We’re always waiting for thunderstorms that usually begin after mid August.
    We are lucky that we live at around 3000’, so it’s not as bad for us as others. Half of the downstairs of our house is built into the hillside, so we can get along without A/C. Fortunately, it’s pretty dry and gets cool at night. We keep our windows closed during the day and open at night.

  18. #38
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    Finster101's Avatar
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    Mid-point of rainy season here in SWFLA. You can pretty much count on it every afternoon and when it starts the squall line will have the rain going sideways. I have a 24' wide pole barn and nothing in it stays dry in the summer no matter where it is parked. In a month or two I will have to be running the sprinkler to keep the grass and my plants from dying. Mid to low 90's everyday and about 80% humidity. It does cool off nice in the evening after the rain though. I'm not giving up my AC anytime soon.

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Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check