RepackboxMidSouth Shooters SupplyTitan ReloadingRotoMetals2
ADvertise hereLee PrecisionBonettInline Fabrication

Donate Now Goal amount for this year: 6000 USD, Received: 4695 USD (78%)
Our Annual server fund drive is going on now! This donation drive helps fund Cast Boolits for an entire year, and helps support our 2nd amendment rights! You can donate by Paypal by clicking the DONATE button. Or by Cash / Check / MO to the address below:

Willy Snyder
PO Box 2732
Pocatello, ID 83206
****Due to overwhelming e-mails, I will be very slow in updating this list. Please bear with me!****


Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: How to protect mild steel gun parts?

  1. #1
    Boolit Master

    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Fl.
    Posts
    1,057

    How to protect mild steel gun parts?

    So continuing with the saga of my Japanese made HAWES Tower pistol….
    I was giving it a thorough cleaning and noticed dozens of surface casting imperfections on combination lock plate / flash pan, hammer, flint clamp and frizzen / pan cover. These parts seem to be made of fairly “soft” steel. All are in the white, with the barrel itself being very smoothly finished.
    Mostly imperfections are surface dimples and irregular casting dips and seams. None of which are on pieces that would be stressed by the powder charge ignition.
    I have dressed up most of these areas with files followed by progressively finer grits of sand paper down to 600 grit. It’s starting to look pretty good. I’ve had this pistol 54 years and have kept it well coated w / oil to preserve the finish. There are only a few spots of very slight tarnish, no perceivable pitting.
    Now I’m thinking of ways to protect the steel from oxidation. Some sort of aesthetic coating or finish. For obvious reasons cerra-coat is not an option. Would coating with some sort of oil and mildly heating these parts aid in this regard? I know some steel can be surface case hardened but don’t know if that would help.

  2. #2
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Central Texas
    Posts
    568
    Cold blue?

  3. #3
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    3,445
    I think Lamping would work.
    That is , heating up the steel and dipping it in oil.
    That does darken the finish and leaves a surface coating to protect it from rust.
    Surface hardening will also help.
    But if the steel is mild steel , be careful not to heat the cast parts to the point they melt.
    Cold bluing is another option for competing you can do quickly.
    I would have to see the parts to see if Browning or Slow Rust Bluing would look good.
    But all options that you can do at home , will give you rust protection.
    But just a good coat of oil on the White metal parts will give you some rust protection.
    But you have to keep oiling the parts as the oil dries out and wipes off over time.

  4. #4
    Boolit Grand Master



    M-Tecs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    7,881
    Renaissance Wax is a brand of microcrystalline wax polish used in antique restoration and museum conservation around the world. Commonly used to polish and conserve metal objects, it is also used on gemstones and such organic materials as wood, ivory, and tortoiseshell. The product is sometimes used by reenactors to protect armor and weapons. Waxes are more protective and longer-lasting than oil, especially for swords and helmets that are frequently touched by human hands. It has recently been introduced in the world of guitar building, as a finish that protects and gives color to the wood.
    2nd Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. - "A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed."

    "Before you argue with someone, ask yourself, is that person even mentally mature enough to grasp the concept of different perspectives? Because if not, there’s absolutely no point."
    – Amber Veal

    "The Highest form of ignorance is when your reject something you don't know anything about".
    - Wayne Dyer

  5. #5
    Boolit Master
    elk hunter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Central Oregon
    Posts
    1,410
    X2 on wax.
    BIG OR SMALL I LIKE THEM ALL, 577 TO 22 HORNET.

  6. #6
    Boolit Buddy muskeg13's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Houston, Alaska
    Posts
    262
    A light coat of boiled linseed oil allowed to dry. This works on browned muzzleloader barrels.

  7. #7
    Moderator Emeritus / Trusted loob groove dealer

    waksupi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Somers, Montana, a quaint little drinking village,with a severe hunting and fishing problem.
    Posts
    18,824
    Gotta be careful of heat on these lock plates. I was sent a lock to work on many years ago from one of these. I found out it was made of pot metal, when I went to hot brown it, the plate melted!

    I would personally would let it age naturally.
    The solid soft lead bullet is undoubtably the best and most satisfactory expanding bullet that has ever been designed. It invariably mushrooms perfectly, and never breaks up. With the metal base that is essential for velocities of 2000 f.s. and upwards to protect the naked base, these metal-based soft lead bullets are splendid.
    John Taylor - "African Rifles and Cartridges"

    Forget everything you know about loading jacketed bullets. This is a whole new ball game!


  8. #8
    Boolit Grand Master uscra112's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Switzerland of Ohio
    Posts
    5,181
    If you want it to stay bright, wax it. Me, I'd just let it alone, to develop it's own patina.
    Cognitive Dissident

  9. #9
    Boolit Buddy

    Noah Zark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    123
    Corrosion-X.

    Noah

  10. #10
    Boolit Master

    David2011's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Baytown Texas
    Posts
    3,913
    Having a shop full of cast iron wood and metal working tools that were mostly acquired used, this has worked for me. After cleaning the surfaces back to bright, I coat with Boeshield T-9 and let it set for 24-48 hours and then wipe it off. Don’t use any solvents. Let it dry. Wax it. For shop tools I use Johnson’s Paste Wax but for firearms I would Renaissance use as M-Tecs said.
    Sometimes life taps you on the shoulder and reminds you it's a one way street. Jim Morris

  11. #11
    Moderator Emeritus

    georgerkahn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    South of the (Canada) border
    Posts
    2,228
    I was gifted an ollld (unfireable) scattergun years back which shared quite a bit of surface rust. A gunsmith at a show I attended recommended using a product called G96 to clean all parts -- leaving the final spray on for a few minutes before wiping excess -- then leaving all to dry. When dry, he also recommended using a product called Flitz Gun Wax.Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Flitz RG&K Wax.jpg 
Views:	4 
Size:	27.5 KB 
ID:	301634 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	G96.jpg 
Views:	4 
Size:	26.9 KB 
ID:	301635 Albeit the scattergun is no more than a wall-hanger -- it remains looking as rust-free/good as it did shortly after I applied the Flitz.
    What I do.

  12. #12
    Boolit Grand Master uscra112's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Switzerland of Ohio
    Posts
    5,181
    Quote Originally Posted by Noah Zark View Post
    Corrosion-X.

    Noah
    My .02 worth - I have an Iver Johnson .22 revolver that is used to drive off raccoons and opossums from the kitchen porch. Lived in a kitchen drawer, and of course kitchens are often humid. I was using Corrosion-X on it. but it got rust on it anyway.

    Phil
    Cognitive Dissident

  13. #13
    Boolit Grand Master

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Bloomfield, Nebraska
    Posts
    6,022
    Very Soft metal and I lost two frizzens trying to harden them One spark and they either went soft again or broke in half. I would brown and wax the parts for a more original look.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check