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Thread: Dremel Accessories

  1. #1
    Boolit Master


    GregLaROCHE's Avatar
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    Dremel Accessories

    I finally bought a Dremel tool. I was tired of using a big electric drill grinding small objects. The tool came with a few bits, but not much. I am wondering what I should be buying to use for it. What types of tools have members found to be the most useful? Should I buy things individually or go for a big kit of different types? Do I need to beware of cheap Chinese junk? I will mostly be using it on steel. Is it better to invest in carbide tools in place of HSS?
    Thanks for all advice.

  2. #2
    Boolit Master
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    I pick up my Dremel cutting bits from Home Depot ,Lowe's and even the throw away bits that HF has.
    But I don't use the Dremel that much.
    But over time you will learn how the tips cut and which tips to buy.
    Once you know what tips you are going to use for your kind of work.
    Then you can shop around on the net and stock up on those bits at a better price.
    Lots of the Hobby / Craft stores also sell the cutting tips.
    Years ago , my wife bought me a 100 piece cutting tool tip kit from HF.
    I was pleased because it had a wide selection to try.
    The tips didn't last like the good ones.
    But you have a cheaper way of buying a big selection and trying different shaped cutters.
    Then I knew what tips I use most.
    I still have that HF tip selection in my shop.
    I used 2/3s of them and have 1/3 left that dont fit what I was working on.
    I use my Dremel more on other hobbies or crafts than I use it for my gunsmithing.
    Last edited by LAGS; 06-17-2022 at 01:21 AM.

  3. #3
    Boolit Master

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    I buy them individually for the most part. I still haven't found a use for some of the ones in the kit after 40 years! The tips I use the most are: HD Cut-off wheel, 1/8" round Burr, Bevel shaped bit and a full set of sanding drums and wire wheels. These are my "goto" bits. I have collected and use very little some Cratex polishing wheels, 1mm Diamond tipped burrs, Grindstones of different shapes and felt bobs. I have never found a use for their sanding discs!
    Old enough to know better, young enough to do it anyway!

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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by GregLaROCHE View Post
    I finally bought a Dremel tool. I was tired of using a big electric drill grinding small objects. The tool came with a few bits, but not much. I am wondering what I should be buying to use for it. What types of tools have members found to be the most useful? Should I buy things individually or go for a big kit of different types? Do I need to beware of cheap Chinese junk? I will mostly be using it on steel. Is it better to invest in carbide tools in place of HSS?
    Thanks for all advice.
    I have several Dremels, as well as a Foredom-branded similar tool. I often think, "Why did I buy these?" as I see dust collecting on them -- BUT -- similarly, when I NEED them -- no other tool I know of will work so well! My not-too-local Home Depot has quite an assortment of bits, albeit I find them rather pricey. However -- if you are in need, they often have the solution in a blister-pack.
    One attached tool I'd NOT be without is their EZ-lock cutting tool. A tool-less arbor on which you simply clip in the wheel -- and it cuts, cuts, and cuts -- so ever rarely breaking. So useful, I keep one Dremel set up with this.Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	301316 Zoro tools now offer the kit for less than twenty-five U S dollars -- a great price, imho.
    Re "the kit"? I've bought a few thru the years, and now have boxes with a zillion goodies I've yet to use, and probably never will... BUT... it's only money!
    Enjoy your Dremel!
    geo

  5. #5
    Boolit Master Sasquatch-1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by georgerkahn View Post
    One attached tool I'd NOT be without is their EZ-lock cutting tool. A tool-less arbor on which you simply clip in the wheel -- and it cuts, cuts, and cuts -- so ever rarely breaking. So useful, I keep one Dremel set up with this.Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Dremel EZ Lock.jpg 
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ID:	301316 Zoro tools now offer the kit for less than twenty-five U S dollars -- a great price, imho.
    +1 on this kit. By far the thing I use most. Your tool probably came with a few cut off wheels that have to be secured with a screw. This kit makes it SOOOOO much easier to use.

    I also find these very handy.

    Click image for larger version. 

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  6. #6
    Boolit Grand Master

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    Sir, Its really hard to have every thing on hand you will want or need. I have a dremil with the flex shaft but much prefer my Foredom flex shaft. They are versatile tools and hand for a lot of work.
    Here is a list of bits I have on hand
    1/8 carbide bur set
    1/4" carbide burr set
    AN assortment of stones on 1/8" shanks shapes grits sizes and materials
    A set of cratex rubber abrasives
    various brushes in nylon and hair
    felt bobs in various sizes and shapes.
    Raw hided bobs in shapes and sizes.
    a dressing stick for the stones and bobs.
    The stones will do a lot of work but finding what dosnt load or burn can be tricky. Stones can be re dressed to the desired shapw and should be dressed to true up when mounted.
    The cratex are rubber bonded diamond and do polishing and fine finishes very well They also handle hard materials very well
    the brushes with fine abrasives will polish to a mirror shine or clean. Used with fLitz diamond or rouges they are great
    the felt bobs with the above rouges will polish and shine break burrs
    the rawhides are great for deburring and rough polish as is.
    The small dressing stick is a needed must have as stone bobs can be dressed to form also they should be dressed when mounted to tru up

    ONE last point is when dressing do it under the bench top to protect you if a wheel or bob should let go.
    I Tend to stay away from aluminum shanks or the really cheap points as they may end up in one of my 80,000-100,000 die grinders. WHEN one bends its a experience to say the least.

  7. #7
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    Thanks georgerkahn, you just cost me $15
    Ron

  8. #8
    Boolit Buddy Rapidrob's Avatar
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    Both thin grit cut-off wheels and thick fiber glass cut-off wheels. Diamond grit grinding wheels are great! The Rubber/ ultra fine polishing wheels are perfect for polishing gun stuff

  9. #9
    Boolit Grand Master
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    I probably have 5 Dremel tools in the shops. And other brands that I consider superior. My favorite is a Foredom flex shaft with hand piece and 1/3 HP variable speed motor on the other end. And the WeCheer.

    And I changed out those stupid collets to a little tiny 3-jaw chuck they make.

    Most valuable is the sensitive drill press stand I modified to fit the latest generation of Dremel. They are constantly changing the contour and shape of the darned things so accessories will not fit!

    I rarely use the Dremels, but when you need just that special grind/cut/polish/hole they work great.

  10. #10
    Boolit Buddy
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    Buy individual bits to suit needs. I find the cut off wheels, grinding stones, and various carbide bits most useful. A caution using the carbide burrs - the shards being cut off are very sharp, fine metal slivers and tend to stick easily into exposed skin. Wear gloves of your choice and be conscious of grinding debris...

  11. #11
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    Those are handy as a pocket on a shirt. I have two. Sears has the best selection in my area. On the small disks I double them up. I bought a cable drive for mine but never had a use for it. I don't even know why I bought it. It was there. I work on carburetors and couldn't get along without it. It's handy for replacing bushings in moving parts. I have used the same ones almost every working day for 30+years without a problem. Just have your glasses on when in use. I had one tooth longer than the rest. I ground it down and saved $300. <what the doc was going to charge.> I don't see how people get along without one.

  12. #12
    Boolit Master Hannibal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 45DUDE View Post
    Those are handy as a pocket on a shirt. I have two. Sears has the best selection in my area. On the small disks I double them up. I bought a cable drive for mine but never had a use for it. I don't even know why I bought it. It was there. I work on carburetors and couldn't get along without it. It's handy for replacing bushings in moving parts. I have used the same ones almost every working day for 30+years without a problem. Just have your glasses on when in use. I had one tooth longer than the rest. I ground it down and saved $300. <what the doc was going to charge.> I don't see how people get along without one.
    Amateur dentistry? Unless in the midst of a collapse of society I'm going to pass on that.

  13. #13
    Boolit Grand Master
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    Don't laugh! I have 2 dental air turbine hand pieces. GREAT for intricate work, where having a clumsy Dremel motor tool hanging out of you hand is very awkward. at up to 30K RPM (or higher) these things really do the job where they are needed. Haven't hung my DENTIST shingle out front of the shop..............yet!

  14. #14
    Boolit Master


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    Every Christmas the big box store has sales on the Dremel accessories. I buy a couple works for the 3 Dremel's and 1 Forster tool I have, for bigger projects I use my tool grinder 1/4-inch tools just like a Dremel.

  15. #15
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    Thanks for the info guys. While I was in a store today for something else, I checked out the Dremel accessories. There were so many different styles available I need to do a little more research. Maybe see if there’s an interesting video out there about them.
    Other question, how fast do normally run them. High speed most of the time or slower speeds too?

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by GregLaROCHE View Post
    Thanks for the info guys. While I was in a store today for something else, I checked out the Dremel accessories. There were so many different styles available I need to do a little more research. Maybe see if there’s an interesting video out there about them.
    Other question, how fast do normally run them. High speed most of the time or slower speeds too?
    The "secret to success" with most Dremel uses is its (high) speed. I very rarely use mine at slow speeds -- except for specific operations such as drilling; sanding wood and plastic; and some grinding. Plastic has often challenged me, as the stuff will too readily melt and clog up/make tool useless. So -- 'specially when Dremeling plastics, slow (to attenuate heat) is -- for me -- the word.

  17. #17
    Boolit Master
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    I have one real Dremel and two chinese copys (like them better - ergonomics ) The real Dremel has a little keyless check . One chinese one at my electronics bench gets the most work grinding jiffy boxes and general tidying up - its wired up to a foot pedal switch best idea I had yet!!
    A real one is high side of hundred bucks for the bare machine I got the copy(s) for around 50 with a box of accessories - then later little boxes of grinding wheels , sanding discs showed up for 8 - 12 bucks - I use (break too) a lot of the skinny cutoff wheels, lots of the drum sanding discs, and the set of burrs that Sasquatch showed earlier. Looked at the quick connect system - couldnt see the value. One tip - find a proper open end spanner that fits the collet chuck and keep it right close makes tool changing much easier.

  18. #18
    Boolit Master
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    bite the bullet and buy carbide cutters and burrs

  19. #19
    Boolit Buddy
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    I never run on high. There is no need. You need to have steady hands to use one. There is an art to make things look right and using the correct attachments for the job. My wife uses one doing stained glass projects.
    Last edited by 45DUDE; 06-17-2022 at 10:01 PM.

  20. #20
    Boolit Grand Master



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    Quote Originally Posted by GregLaROCHE View Post
    Thanks for the info guys. While I was in a store today for something else, I checked out the Dremel accessories. There were so many different styles available I need to do a little more research. Maybe see if there’s an interesting video out there about them.
    Other question, how fast do normally run them. High speed most of the time or slower speeds too?
    That depends on the tool and the material you are using it on. HSS tools are easy to burn and remove the temper. Carbide is better but you still can run it too fast for some materials. Grinding wheels tend to perform best at high speeds. Felt or rubber abrasive will come apart at high speeds. Same for the wire brushes.
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