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Thread: What I did to my Shotguns

  1. #41
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    W.R.Buchanan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Baltimoreed View Post
    Attachment 302699This is what I’ve done to two Model 12 field guns. For the purists out there, one had a broken stock and a polychoke and the other a cut stock and a reblue.
    BE: Don't sweat it, Plenty more where they came from!

    Randy
    "It's not how well you do what you know how to do,,,It's how well you do what you DON'T know how to do!"
    www.buchananprecisionmachine.com

  2. #42
    Boolit Master Baltimoreed's Avatar
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ID:	302726Started on a M1912 20 ga polychoked field gun into a riot. Been too hot out in my barn. Should be a handy dandy 20 ga pump.

  3. #43
    Boolit Master pmer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by W.R.Buchanan View Post
    pmer: First what kind of gun is it? Most Stock Field Grade Pump Guns have stocks that are dimensioned for "Mr. Average Guy." IE: 13.5" to 14.5" LOP. In any event you need to mount the gun so the toe of the stock is in the pocket of your shoulder. There is sometimes some speculation of where that "pocket" is?
    I had to learn it a few years ago even though I have been shooting for 60+ years.

    Reach under your armpit, put your fingers directly into the pit and close your thumb around your Pectoral Muscle just below your shoulder bone. That's where your pocket is.

    When you mount the gun properly with the Toe in the Pocket you then mash your cheek bone down on the comb of the stock. As the gun recoils your head should travel with it, and "smacking in the chops" doesn't happen.

    This will take practice to master!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!..

    It took me a while to get this down and I still get smacked sometimes on the first shot after laying off for a while. However I am quickly reminded of what I forget and correct for the next shot.

    I am currently learning how to shoot Skeet. One of the key factors in clay bird shooting is keeping your head on the gun. That means keeping your cheek bone directly on the comb of the stock. IF you don't, you will shoot high every time and 1/4" of the comb equals 3 feet at the target!

    I find myself raising my head up a lot even though I am concentrating on it, but my .410 O/U doesn't have any significant recoil so there is no pain associated with it. Plus that 1/4" off the comb doesn't give the gun much distance to build momentum and hurt you. The penalty is just another miss. Even with my 12 ga. it isn't that bad. The gun weighs almost 9 lbs. But that one small factor is haunting me, and lately I find myself relaxing as the shot breaks, and raising my cheek bone just ever so slightly maybe 1/4". I have caught myself doing it even though before I called for the bird I was concentrating on having my Cheek Weld hard in place! This will take practice to get past just like it did with my combat guns. It took me 3 classes to get past this or about 1200 rounds! YMMV?

    Typically for a Combat Shotgun you want the stock a little shorter than for a field gun. 12.5-13" LOP seems to work for most people unless you are really tall. The whole idea of doing this is so that your stance is squared up to the target a little more which helps absorb the Recoil better so you can make follow up shots faster. This comes into play when doing multiple shot drills where you have to hit 2,3,4 targets in a row. you get 1.7, 2.1 and 2.7 seconds to complete these shots. Not too hard with a SA, but a Pump gun is definitely more challenging.

    But my main point here is that you've got to keep your head on the gun! Only practice will make that happen.

    Hope this helps.

    Randy
    The one that's giving me trouble is the Browning BPS 10 gauge. I took a couple pictures for comparison. The BPS 10 is on the right. Center is a 870 pump with a vent rib barrel installed. Left is a Remington 1889 10ga SXS.
    BPS 10ga lop 14.5" comb is 1.75" drop at heel
    870 12 ga lop 13 7/8" comb is 2 3/8" drop
    1889 sxs 10ga lop 13 1/4" (rear trigger) comb goes from 2 3/16 to 3 1/4 at the heel.

    With the side by side and the 870 I have no trouble with cheek slap but the BPS 10 another story. I suppose it's worse because of the heavier loads but I got to wondering if it's for 2 more reasons - comb too high and LOP is too long? If I put the toe deep in the pocket it will shoot high. If I mount it to be properly lined up on the vent rib the heel is above my shoulder and I'm mashing my cheek bone on top of the comb. A couple of hi velocity steel loads is about all my cheek can handle.
    In contrast the Remington 10 gauge sxs is a dream to shoot recoil wise. And it patterns 1 1/4 oz loads of buckshot very tight. I usually start at 20 - 25 yards to see pattern development. But I think manufacturers put more time into the forcing cones and chokes back then too.

    So I guess I'm thinking out loud trying to convince myself that I have to do something with the butt stock of the BPS 10 to make it more usable. The pictures seem to help drive the point.
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    Last edited by pmer; 07-31-2022 at 11:06 PM.
    Oh great, another thread that makes me spend money.

  4. #44
    Boolit Master pmer's Avatar
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    Oh great, another thread that makes me spend money.

  5. #45
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    As a recoil sensitive trap shooter who had to shoot up to 400 rounds a day and 1200+ rounds during an event, I had to tame recoil. Gun fit...gun fit...gun fit.

    If I can find it and post it, I have an write up on it I will post when I get to my main computer.

    Adding mass helps a lot. But who wants a 10 lb tactical shotgun?

    IMO people use much heavier loads than necessary.
    Don Verna


  6. #46
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    Yes, Heavier loads are meant for shooting Polar Bears. Anything below that you are fine with #8 birdshot level loads. All my 12 ga. Reloads and that means slugs and buckshot too, are loaded in my Standard Trap Loads of AA Hulls with 18 or20 gr of Green Dot Claybuster Wad and fold crimp. Payloads are by weight so the shell doesn't know if it has an ounce of bird shot or buckshot or a 1 oz. slug.

    The reason for the two different powder charges is because I changed my Progressive DL366 from 18 to 20gr to get a better burn. The higher pressure burns the powder more completely, so less unburned powder left in the barrel.. I didn't have another bushing for DL266 so it stayed at 18 gr. Makes very little difference on slug and buckshot loads at that level.

    Training with High Power 12 ga. loads is stoopid. You are just beating yourself for no reason, and all you will teach yourself is how much you don't want to shoot that gun.

    As far as you 10 ga. guns I can't really offer up anything beyond what I just said above. These are strictly Hunting Weapons so you are never going to shoot a large volume of shells in one sitting. All I can say is drag the gun into your shoulder hard, keep your head on the gun, and just take the recoil, not much more you can do.

    But you can reload your 10g Ammo to lower levels and that might help.

    Randy.
    "It's not how well you do what you know how to do,,,It's how well you do what you DON'T know how to do!"
    www.buchananprecisionmachine.com

  7. #47
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    @pmer, there may be some things you can do to adjust your current BPS stock. I'm unsure of the availability of shims for a BPS. If you can find them, that is a super easy way to adjust stock angle. It could be that you prefer a shorter LOP. In the pictures it looks like you have a slip on pad on there, but I'm sure you've tried it without that pad. You can then replace the recoil pad with a thinner one to reduce LOP. The issue I see there is you describe the comb as being too high. Well the shorter your LOP, the farther forward your head sits, and ultimately the higher your eye goes since the front of your comb is higher than the rear. If none of that helps, the BPS has been made for many years, and I think it is likely an older stock may be shaped different than yours. If you really want to take the time to make it your own, you could buy a wood stock and add an adjustable comb kit. One last tip that might not help, but it almost sounds like your pitch might be off. You can buy pitch spacers that change the angle of your recoil pad. If your pad bottom is poking into your shoulder, changing the pitch may help to get that pad square to you.

  8. #48
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    I have a new Browning Citori CXS 32" I have been using for learning Skeet, the problem I have found with teh gun is that teh stock Recoil Pad which is Radiused on all surfaces doesn't index into my shoulder the same way every time.. When shooting clays it is a well known fact that if your cheek comes off the comb of the stock 1/4" it equals 3 feet high at the target 25 yards away.

    My solution to this is to put a Pachmayer Trap Pad on the gun that has sharp edges and curvature that fits my shoulder better. This sir the same pad I put on my Browning A5 Tactical Gun. It is real squishy and the part that contacts your shoulder is textured so it stays in position really well. Luckily I have an extra one in my shop because the new price on them is over $60 !!!

    Randy
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    "It's not how well you do what you know how to do,,,It's how well you do what you DON'T know how to do!"
    www.buchananprecisionmachine.com

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Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check