RepackboxADvertise hereTitan ReloadingLee Precision
Inline FabricationRotoMetals2

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 41

Thread: Do all alloy? Any suggestions?

  1. #1

    Do all alloy? Any suggestions?

    Iím new to casting, and intend to cast of all of my handguns and a few rifles ranging from mid to hot(ish) loads. Iím curious if anyone can suggest a sort of do all alloy? I have a couple hundred pounds of cleaned and ingoted wheel weights as well as about a hundred pounds or so of rotometals linotype, which I broke down into one pound ingots. I also intend to powder coat and gas check most boolits that I cast. Would something like 4 pounds wheel weights to one pound linotype do the job? Maybe 3:1? Or any other suggested alloy would be much appreciated!!

  2. #2
    Boolit Grand Master


    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    6,968
    Are you going to hunt with cast or just shoot targets?
    Don Verna

    NRA Endowment Member

  3. #3
    Boolit Grand Master

    Winger Ed.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Just outside Gun Barrel City, Texas
    Posts
    5,949
    The Lyman #2 formula is pretty general purpose, and usually what you see used in the loading books.

    I'd recommend a lot of reading about & into the particulars of what you plan on shooting, and with what.
    Different recipes of alloys are like different kinds of tires or light bulbs.
    Each is good for some uses, and not so good, or needed in others.
    Political Correctness and the cancel culture is only allowed to exist because of the coward culture.


    In school: We learn lessons, and are given tests.
    In life: We are given tests, and learn lessons.

  4. #4
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    2,253
    I use wheel weights with 2% tin. It's all I have ever used. Frank

  5. #5
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    NE Kansas
    Posts
    1,888
    Clip on Wheel Weights is a pretty general alloy to use. 1-2% tin helps with mold fill out. If you need a stronger alloy, many will heat treat and quench or add Linotype to make a harder alloy. If you powder coat, I am reading a few places that faster velocities are not doing as well if powder coated over the conventionally lubricated bullets. Seldom does a pistol bullet need a gas check. Have you read through one of the Lyman Cast Bullet Handbooks?

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by dverna View Post
    Are you going to hunt with cast or just shoot targets?
    I plan on doing both actually, but mostly general purpose ranch chores, snakes and other rodents/pests for handguns, and varmints and other general use for rifles, i tend more towards revolvers(Rugers) that i can hot load

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Winger Ed. View Post
    The Lyman #2 formula is pretty general purpose, and usually what you see used in the loading books.

    I'd recommend a lot of reading about & into the particulars of what you plan on shooting, and with what.
    Different recipes of alloys are like different kinds of tires or light bulbs.
    Each is good for some uses, and not so good, or needed in others.
    Correct me if I’m wrong, but wouldn’t Lyman #2 be similar to a 3:1 WW to linotype alloy or is it closer to a 2:1? And thank you I intend to to quite a lot of reading and research before ever casting my first boolit.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by samari46 View Post
    I use wheel weights with 2% tin. It's all I have ever used. Frank
    May i ask what you are using them in though, and and what sort of velocities?

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Dusty Bannister View Post
    Clip on Wheel Weights is a pretty general alloy to use. 1-2% tin helps with mold fill out. If you need a stronger alloy, many will heat treat and quench or add Linotype to make a harder alloy. If you powder coat, I am reading a few places that faster velocities are not doing as well if powder coated over the conventionally lubricated bullets. Seldom does a pistol bullet need a gas check. Have you read through one of the Lyman Cast Bullet Handbooks?
    I haven’t yet read any of the Lyman handbooks, I need to get my hands on one, just haven’t been able to yet. Those are actually next on my list to acquire. So if I’m understanding right, I need to consider either Alox or getting a lubrasizer, to get to better/higher velocities? What about things like hot .357 or hot 45LC as far as gas checks are concerned, especially since I tend to run the same bullet through my revolver as well as a carbine?

  10. #10
    Boolit Master


    Walks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    2,808
    I would check the Los Angeles Silhouette Club website. They have many articles on the Cast Bullet. Many by Glen Fryxell.
    I would buy a Lyman Cast Bullet manual before you do anything else.
    Sort of a Read the instructions First thing.
    I HATE auto-correct

    Happiness is a Warm GUN & more ammo to shoot in it.

    My Experience and My Opinion, are just that, Mine.

    SASS #375 Life

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Walks View Post
    I would check the Los Angeles Silhouette Club website. They have many articles on the Cast Bullet. Many by Glen Fryxell.
    I would buy a Lyman Cast Bullet manual before you do anything else.
    Sort of a Read the instructions First thing.
    I appreciate the input and will definitely get my hands on the Lyman Cast Bullets Handbook as soon as I can. Also thanks for the info on the LA Silhouette website I’ll definitely give it a look.

  12. #12
    Boolit Grand Master

    Winger Ed.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Just outside Gun Barrel City, Texas
    Posts
    5,949
    Quote Originally Posted by Rancher2882 View Post
    Correct me if I’m wrong, but wouldn’t Lyman #2 be similar to a 3:1 WW
    I don't know. I home brew my alloys, and only have two. To conserve the expensive 'goodies':
    I use as soft an alloy as I can get away with for slow speed handgun loads going around 800-ish fps.
    For gas checked rifle boolits, at 1500-2,000-ish, I make up a big batch that's pretty hard, but I never tested it.

    I'm about as low tech as you can get, and try my best not to over think this stuff.
    I don't have a thermometer, PID, hardness tester, digital scale, digital caliper, powder coat set up,
    and I'm trying to be the last person in the US to not have a cell phone.

    Anyway---
    It's good to see new members here, and feel free to ask anything before you dive off into uncharted waters.
    All these old geezers around here will help all they can, and try to keep ya safe.

    I tend to go easy on 'hot-ish' loads myself.
    I figure if I really want a .357Mag, rather than trying to make one out of a .38--- I'll save up and buy one.

    I concentrate on accuracy, which normally is best around 80-90% of the max. loads you see in the books.
    Hot-ish is OK with cast, but no matter what you're shooting--you can't miss fast enough to win.
    Last edited by Winger Ed.; 01-10-2022 at 04:44 AM.
    Political Correctness and the cancel culture is only allowed to exist because of the coward culture.


    In school: We learn lessons, and are given tests.
    In life: We are given tests, and learn lessons.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Winger Ed. View Post
    The Lyman #2 formula is pretty general purpose, and usually what you see used in the loading books.

    I'd recommend a lot of reading about & into the particulars of what you plan on shooting, and with what.
    Different recipes of alloys are like different kinds of tires or light bulbs.
    Each is good for some uses, and not so good, or needed in others.
    I second this.
    Pick up a the Lyman cast bullet handbook and check the load recipes. #2 is not suitable for all loads and powders, obviously, but a large portion of the calibers will have a loadout for #2.

    There is a short paragraph in one of the earlier chapters (probably want to add a bookmark to it, I know I did) that tells you the breakdown of the various common alloys. You can (more or less) create #2 from pure lead and pewter if I remember correctly (sorry, I'm at work and can't check the handbook or my recipe book)

    #2 is 90% Lead, 5% Tin, 5% Antimony. Modern pewter is tin, copper, and antimony.
    Use the alloy calculator (https://castboolits.gunloads.com/sho...oy-calculators) to determine how much to add.
    Last edited by jcourson; 01-10-2022 at 10:02 AM.

  14. #14
    Vendor Sponsor


    DougGuy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    just above Raleigh North Carolina
    Posts
    6,652
    50/50+2% (COWW + pure lead + tin) is a very good all around alloy, it takes to Ruger rifling like a duck to water. It's just soft enough to scratch with a thumbnail making it an excellent choice for hunting boolits. IIRC, Elmer Keith recommended 30:1 for general handgun use, with 20:1 used for longer distances. 30:1 is pretty close to 50/50+2%. I get great accuracy with 50/50+2% and soft lube, haven't needed to clean a revolver barrel in YEARS. Gas checks work very well with this alloy.
    Got a .22 .30 .32 .357 .38 .40 .41 .44 .45 .480 or .500 S&W cylinder that needs throats honed? 9mm, 10mm/40S&W, 45 ACP pistol barrel that won't "plunk" your handloads? Click here to send me a PM You can also find me on Facebook Click Here.

  15. #15
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Pleasant Hope MO
    Posts
    1,734
    Since I started coating with Hi-tek I use wheel weights with 2% tin which test around 10 to 11 BHN, this works for 9 mm to .45ACP. I have not had to clean any lead out of a barrel for several years now but remember correct bullet fit is king.

  16. #16
    Boolit Grand Master


    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    6,968
    For pests and target work I use commercial alloy...sometimes called "hardball" in .38+P loads in a lever action carbine. It is 92-2-6 alloy. Easy to find and not too expensive. I use it in my other pistol calibers for target shooting. I do not cast for rifles.

    I used to mix stuff (range scrap and linotype), but I am lazy, and with a known alloy it makes things easier.

    I see you put snakes on your list. Lots of info on snake loads here if you look for it.
    Don Verna

    NRA Endowment Member

  17. #17
    Boolit Grand Master
    bangerjim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    out of here, wandering somewhere in the SW.
    Posts
    10,086
    50/50+2% (COWW & pure lead & tin) is a good general alloy I use all the time in just about everthing.....+PC, of course. PC allows you to shoot softer alloys.

    GC's are only needed for hot, fast loads. I rarely ever use them except in my 30 cal rifle loads.

    But get the books and read up on the subject a bit.

  18. #18
    Boolit Master

    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    WNY
    Posts
    1,238
    Save your linotype!! COWW alloy is a pretty good boolit metal as is for pistol loads and lower velocity rifle loads (under 1500 fps). After reading Glen Fryxel's work, I started mixing my own alloy, 94-3-3. As described in his writing, having equal amounts of tin and antimony allows the alloy to be "tougher" not harder. It will resist fragmenting better than a harder alloy. You can easily make this from COWW by adding 2% tin. If you can get your hands on some pure lead, mix it with your linotype (84-12-4) 3 parts lead to 1 part lino. This yields 96-3-1 which is essentially today's COWW alloy. Add 2% tin and you have 94-3-3. It's a beautiful alloy to work with!

    Here's a link to the LASC site where you'll find Glen Fryxel's work. Glen has a PhD in Metallurgy and is employed by one of the National Laboratories, he knows what he's talking about!

    http://www.lasc.us/CastBulletNotes.htm
    "We take a thousand moments for granted thinking there will be a thousand more to come. Each day, each breath, each beat of your heart is a gift. Live with love & joy, tomorrow is not promised to anyone......"

    unknown



    May the forest be with you....

  19. #19
    Boolit Master

    Rcmaveric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Jacksonville, FL
    Posts
    2,352
    When I started. I use clip on wheel weights for everything. After experimenting and learning what i was doing. I started using softer. I pretty much use range scraps or 50/50 range scraps to clipons.


    Nonses and above jargon aside. I use BHN 10 for my general purpose alloy.

    Sent from my SM-G991U using Tapatalk
    "Speak softly and carry a big stick; you will go far."
    ~Theodore Roosevelt~

  20. #20
    Boolit Grand Master
    bangerjim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    out of here, wandering somewhere in the SW.
    Posts
    10,086
    Quote Originally Posted by Rcmaveric View Post
    When I started. I use clip on wheel weights for everything. After experimenting and learning what i was doing. I started using softer. I pretty much use range scraps or 50/50 range scraps to clipons.


    Nonses and above jargon aside. I use BHN 10 for my general purpose alloy.

    Sent from my SM-G991U using Tapatalk
    YES................................don't waste your valuable hard alloys on plinking/shooting lead. COWW + pure are perfect for most people. Mabe a 2% dose of Sn to help fills? Your call.

    If you can' find COWW's out there, do what many on here are now doing.....make your own alloy equal to COWW. I am fortunate to be around back in the days of FREE COWW's and have many hundreds of pounds of the alloy in ingots safely stored asway. Just bought 400# of certified COWW alloy ingots for 50Ę/pound about 2 years ago to add my hoard. It's not Au or Ag, but close to it these wild daze!

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check