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Thread: Anybody familier with Quince?

  1. #1
    Boolit Grand Master

    Wayne Smith's Avatar
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    Anybody familier with Quince?

    In the fall I'm always looking for Quince but seldom find them. Quince is a green fruit grown on a bush in most areas. It keeps well but is seldom found in stores. Walmart sometimes has them.

    I use them in Apple pies - they make the pie a little buttery. I have also made Quince liquor in the past when I find them. It is a very good and light tasting liquor. I put a couple of Allspice berries in the liquor with the Quince and 100 proof Vodka. Let them sit for a month in the dark, after that month screen the liquid to remove the solids. Make simple syrup out of sugar or honey or both, add enough sweening that you like (I don't add a lot but most people do) and then take clean water and reduce it to 40 proof and then put it back in the dark for another month for the flavors to combine. You have a great liquor - if you can find quince, that is! I do the same with cranberry, blueberrys you have to freeze, put them in something to break them into pieces frozen, add the Vodka and set them in the dark three months. Then add simple sugar and dilute to 40 proof.

    There are several books available on how to make liquors - if you are interested. When I make an apple pie I take the skins of the apples, remove the seeds and add the cores, and make a liquor of that. That one I will often spice up. When we have a mango I will take the skin and the seed and do the same thing.
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  2. #2
    Boolit Master BJK's Avatar
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    We had a quince "tree" (it wasn't really a tree) in the backyard when I was a child. But for some reason, maybe age, I never thought to make a liquor out of those rock hard fruits. If I remember correctly they'd stay on the tree until late in the season. Maybe later. I seem to remember I was told they were for use in jam/jelly but that was 60 years ago.

  3. #3
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    I have a Quince tree back by my barn. Some years it makes fruit, some years it does not. Sometimes there is quite a lot, sometimes only a few.
    I made some jelly with it once. It was OK, but not great.
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  4. #4
    Boolit Master

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    A good friend has a quince tree in their yard.
    Our grand daughter juices them with a steam juicer and makes some very good jelly.

  5. #5
    Boolit Master



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    My wife uses them as an addition to the preserves and chutney she makes. It adds something a little different to the flavor and texture that is quite nice
    Last edited by square butte; 09-28-2021 at 08:57 AM.
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  6. #6
    Boolit Master
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    When my daughter was in grade school, the class had an alphabet project in which each child was given a letter and tasked with providing a desert/treat for the entire class beginning with their assigned letter. Yep, my kid got "Q". We pondered it awhile and I came up with the notion of baking some basic sugar cookies with a dollop quince jam in the middle. Turned out to be a good cookie.

  7. #7
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    Where I used to live there was a tree that always had a lot. I made some preserves once, but it took a lot of sugar. I found it best to mix with other fruit. I once took a bite of one. That will pucker you up!

  8. #8
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    I have only had Quince once , as Jelly , homemade by a childhood friend's mother ...
    I didn't get all excited about the taste . She had made hot Bisquits and with butter and the Quince Jam on them ... I ate two ... so it couldn't have been too bad .
    I don't remember having any Quince bushes/trees in or around our house ... I may have never seen one .
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  9. #9
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    The one time I saw a quince bush it was at least four feet tall and equally big around with very twisted branches. It was in New England and I was just a kid then and did not know what a quince was. My dad told me that it was a quince bush.
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    The chayote squash – AKA chocho, mirliton, Buddha’s hand melon or laplap – is a Latin American gourd that, during the Columbian exchange, spread across the Caribbean into the present-day American south, the Philippines and throughout Asia.

    Said to be a superfood for its nutritious properties – which include regulating cholesterol, improving circulation and reducing blood sugar – the chayote has been identified by Pinterest as a 2019 food trend after a 76% surge in searches on the web platform in 2018. It is available at outlets from specialty greengrocers to Asda (but few places in-between).

    My partner put three in a bowl alongside the bananas before I restored them to their rightful place in the fridge drawer. In this sense, chayote is a typical gourd, uncertainly positioned between fruit and vegetable, and confusingly sweet for something most often used in a savoury context. To look at, it’s a fruit; if a granny smith and a quince went on a naughty weekend, the chayote might plausibly be the upshot. It has the apple’s lurid green skin, which, unless grated or chopped very finely, is best peeled off its quince-like, quite dry flesh before being added to all manner of dishes.

    Having peeled, cored and sliced one into large dice, I try some raw, and am reminded of an under-ripe green melon or a flavoursome cucumber – it is crunchy and sweet, but not cloyingly so. I like it … but then I’m about to sauté it with butter, garlic, spring onions and parsley, which seems a bit wrong. But it turns out I am the one that’s wrong, because it works well with our meal of chicken, rice and roasted cauliflower, the garlic offsetting the sweetness and the butter bringing richness.

    Like the bitter gourd used in Sri Lankan curries, chayote loses its hard edges when cooked, softening and melting into the other ingredients without losing its crispiness. As Miss Fay, from the YouTube channel Cook Like a Jamaican, says: “It’s very bland in itself, but whatever you add it to, it absorbs the flavour.” For this reason, chayote often isn’t the star of the show, instead fleshing out soups, stews and curries. It’s robust enough to be baked with cheese or stuffed with meat, and absorbs pickle liquor or salad dressing like a pro.

    Chayote won’t be replacing courgette – or other summer squashes, to which it is often compared – in my kitchen any time soon. Although it is clearly versatile, I don’t think it slots into my repertoire seamlessly enough to be worth a special trip to Asda. But I do think that if I were fed (and fell in love with) a dish in which it featured prominently, I would make a point of buying it for that purpose, weaving it into my culinary inventory more as an ingredient for a specific recipe than as a veg drawer novelty.
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    Cajuns like mirliton, pickled or in dishes, if you go onto facebook in the Cajun And Creole Recipe Circle group, and search for mirliton recipes or ask for them, you will find some very interesting and of course very tasty Cajun recipes using this quince or chayote squash.
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  11. #11
    Boolit Buddy
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    My Mom used to make quince jelly. Wish I had some now...it was really good!

  12. #12
    Boolit Master
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    I have heard of it but don't believe I've ever seen it and I know I've never tasted quince, prepared any way. It seems to grow about everywhere, yes?
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