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Thread: Repackaging powder?

  1. #21
    Boolit Master

    alamogunr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geezer in NH View Post
    https://www.houseofcans.com/pint-obl...13r717mj37b9k5

    I get ones that are like metal powder cans
    I buy these by the dozen since they are so versatile. I decant powder from 8 lb containers into the 1 pint. I also use them for Ed's Red(or some variation) since gallon jugs are inconvenient. I also pass on an occasional pint of Ed's Red to a friend or relative. Printable labels are recommended.
    John
    W.TN

  2. #22
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    GregLaROCHE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by yovinny View Post
    When we packed small containers at the explosives plant it was always limited to Antistatic UHMW jugs,, which were always black in color.
    I'm pretty sure thats why all powder comes in black jugs,, or at least thats all I've ever seen it packed in before.
    Using any other plastic jugs, like clear, white, etc, and your taking a chance with static buldup and possibly ignition....however dangerous that is, real or imagined...
    Just for clarity,,, Antistatic polyethylene is only made in black.....or at least that was the only option available up till 5yrs ago, it might be different now.
    I used to be a professional pilot. Airplanes can build up a lot of static electricity. When I needed to fuel my plane myself with Avgas, there was always a ground cable available to ground the aircraft. Some others never used it and would only touch the gas nosil to the plane. I never heard of any mishaps, but I always used the ground.

    Years ago I was wondering about plastic powder containers. The research I found said that the plastic containers used had something added, that would conduct static electricity, so whenever it was put down it would be grounded. I’m not a hundred percent sure how that works for all situations. My reloading bench has a wooden top. I haven’t blown myself up yet, so it must work, or I am really lucky.

  3. #23
    Boolit Bub Postell's Avatar
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    I find it interesting that some folks worry about moisture when dealing with smokless powder.
    Smokeless powder is Hydroscopic, have some forgot that lots of companies used to sell it in cardboard containers.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Postell View Post
    I find it interesting that some folks worry about moisture when dealing with smokless powder.
    Smokeless powder is Hydroscopic, have some forgot that lots of companies used to sell it in cardboard containers.
    The kegs we’re repackaging are exactly that…cardboard tube containers.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Postell View Post
    I find it interesting that some folks worry about moisture when dealing with smokless powder.
    Smokeless powder is Hydroscopic, have some forgot that lots of companies used to sell it in cardboard containers.
    I believe you mean Hygroscopic.... And the definition of Hygroscopic is something that absorbs moisture from the air or surroundings.
    Single base powders are said to be the most Hygroscopic of the smokeless propellants.

  6. #26
    Boolit Buddy gumbo333's Avatar
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    Way back in the 60's our little local gun shop/ gas station sold surplus 4831 for less than 90 cents a pound. Sold out of a big cardboard drum. They put a lb in a white cardboard pint container like what the soft serve DQ ice cream was put in. Labeled it 4831. That powder stayed good for years. Or you could bring your own larger container, jug or bag. Probably a Pepsi bottle would work. Also was the same for surplus 4895. When I first started reloading those powders were 70 cents a pound. Oh the good old days. I think about anything convenient would work. Labeled.
    Never trade luck for skill.

  7. #27
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    Local paint store has plastic gallon containers with metal lids. If using metal make sure they are plated on the inside. The plastic containers are used frequently in my non-powder storage.

    Cans are identified not only on the lids but the cans in case lids become separated. My cost id $1.98 for container, lid and handle.

  8. #28
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    richhodg66's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geezer in NH View Post
    https://www.houseofcans.com/pint-obl...13r717mj37b9k5

    I get ones that are like metal powder cans
    Thank you for this tip. I really like the old metal cans IMR powders used to come in and they use shelf space much more efficiently than round ones do. I will be ordering a few of these.

  9. #29
    Boolit Buddy
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    Back in the late 1960s and into the 1970s surplus powder was easily available, but usually sold in large quantities. Lots of local gun dealers kept powder on hand for retail sales, usually dispensed in brown paper bags by the pound. A few got creative with paint cans and printed labels, which added to the price (couple of bucks per pound instead of a buck).

    I bought a lot of 4831, 4895, and a few others. Usually kept it in re-used powder cans with new labelling to identify contents. Still have a couple of dozen old powder containers sitting around in case of need, although it has been a long time since I have seen bulk powders offered (maybe something to do with modern fire codes and storage laws?).

    Last time I had to think about this was when doing a "buddy purchase" of a 8-lb. keg of pistol powder to be split with a friend. I had the necessary containers so I took my half and let him take home the canister. 8 pounds of pistol powder goes a long way! 5 - 7 grains per round means 1000 to 1400 rounds per pound!

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Postell View Post
    I find it interesting that some folks worry about moisture when dealing with smokless powder.
    Smokeless powder is Hydroscopic, have some forgot that lots of companies used to sell it in cardboard containers.
    Moisture percentages does affect the burn rate. For most it's not an issue. For the extreme accuracy buffs and the long range competitors it is a very real issue.

    http://bulletin.accurateshooter.com/...-need-to-know/

    Humidity and Powder Burn Rates — What You Need to Know
    Tech Tip Norma Powder gunpowder moisture temperature humidity

    Most shooters realize that significant changes in temperature will alter how powders perform. That’s why you want to keep your loaded ammo out of the hot sun, and keep rounds out of a hot chamber until you’re ready to fire. But there are other factors to be considered — HUMIDITY for one. This article explains why and how humidity can affect powder burn rates and performance.

    We’ve all heard the old adage: “Keep your powder dry”. Well, tests by Norma have demonstrated that even normal environmental differences in humidity can affect the way powders burn, at least over the long term. In the Norma Reloading Manual, Sven-Eric Johansson, head of ballistics at Nexplo/Bofors, presents a very important discussion of water vapor absorption by powder. Johansson demonstrates that the same powder will burn at different rates depending on water content.

    Powders Leave the Factory with 0.5 to 1.0% Water Content
    Johansson explains that, as manufactured, most powders contain 0.5 to 1% of water by weight. (The relative humidity is “equilibrated” at 40-50% during the manufacturing process to maintain this 0.5-1% moisture content). Importantly, Johansson notes that powder exposed to moist air for a long time will absorb water, causing it to burn at a slower rate. On the other hand, long-term storage in a very dry environment reduces powder moisture content, so the powder burns at a faster rate. In addition, Johansson found that single-base powders are MORE sensitive to relative humidity than are double-base powders (which contain nitroglycerine).

    Tests Show Burn Rates Vary with Water Content
    In his review of the Norma Manual, Fred Barker notes: “Johansson gives twelve (eye-opening) plots of the velocities and pressures obtained on firing several popular cartridges with dehydrated, normal and hydrated Norma powders (from #200 to MRP). He also gives results on loaded .30-06 and .38 Special cartridges stored for 663 to 683 days in relative humidities of 20% and 86%. So Johansson’s advice is to keep powders tightly capped in their factory containers, and to minimize their exposure to dry or humid air.”

    Confirming Johansson’s findings that storage conditions can alter burn rates, Barker observes: “I have about 10 pounds of WWII 4831 powder that has been stored in dry (about 20% RH) Colorado air for more than 60 years. It now burns about like IMR 3031.”

    What does this teach us? First, all powders start out with a small, but chemically important, amount of water content. Second, a powder’s water content can change over time, depending on where and how the powder is stored. Third, the water content of your powder DOES make a difference in how it burns, particularly for single-base powders. For example, over a period of time, a powder used (and then recapped) in the hot, dry Southwest will probably behave differently than the same powder used in the humid Southeast.

    Reloaders are advised to keep these things in mind. If you want to maintain your powders’ “as manufactured” burn rate, it is wise to head Johannson’s recommendation to keep your powders tightly capped when you’re not actually dispensing charges and avoid exposing your powder to very dry or very humid conditions. The Norma Reloading Manual is available from Amazon.com.

    Real-World Example — “Dry” H4831sc Runs Hotter
    Robert Whitley agrees that the burn rate of the powder varies with the humidity it absorbs. Robert writes: “I had an 8-lb. jug of H4831SC I kept in my detached garage (it can be humid there). 43.5-44.0 gr of this was superbly accurate with the 115 Bergers out of my 6mm Super X. I got tired of bringing it in and out of the garage to my house for reloading so I brought and kept the jug in my reloading room (a dehumidified room in my house) and after a few weeks I loaded up 43.5 gr, went to a match and it shot awful. I could not figure out what was going on until I put that load back over the chronograph and figured out it was going a good bit faster than before and the load was out of the “sweet spot” (42.5 – 43.0 gr was the max I could load and keep it accurate when it was stored in less humid air). I put the jug back in the garage for a few weeks and I now am back to loading 43.5 – 44.0 gr and it shoots great again. I have seen this with other powders too.”

    If you have two jugs of the same powder, one kept in a room in your house and one somewhere else where it is drier or more humid, don’t expect the two jugs of the same lot of powder to chrono the same with the same charge weights unless and until they are both stored long enough in the same place to equalize again.
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  11. #31
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    Lloyd Smale's Avatar
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    never had the need to split up a keg of powder or had to worry about one lasting much more then two years. But i do keep old one lb cans around for if a buddy needs a lb to get by or the powder locker is to full of kegs (which lately hasnt been an issue) I peal the labels off spray a stripe around them with a bright paint like orange or yellow and mark on them what powder is in them. personaly if its a powder i dont use much id rather buy 4 one lb cans even if it costs a bit more. that way the other powder thats sitting a long time is sealed.
    Soldier of God, sixgun junky, Retired electrical lineman. My office was a 100 feet in the air, closer to God the better

  12. #32
    Boolit Master 15meter's Avatar
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    Back in the days of my youth, the local gun shop sold powder in paper bags that were virtually identical to the double walled, fold over with the little wire/paper lock just like what you find in upscale places that grind coffee for you.

    Suspect that would be a source of good bags, if they keep coffee (or nuts or candy) fresh, I suspect that it would work just as well on properly stored gun powder.

    Just not sure I would tell the person/it/non-sexually identified unit behind the counter what you were going to use the bags that you are mooching for.

    It may cause irreparable damage to the person/it/non-sexually identified unit's emotional well being.

  13. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by lobogunleather View Post
    Back in the late 1960s and into the 1970s surplus powder was easily available, but usually sold in large quantities. Lots of local gun dealers kept powder on hand for retail sales, usually dispensed in brown paper bags by the pound. A few got creative with paint cans and printed labels, which added to the price (couple of bucks per pound instead of a buck).

    I bought a lot of 4831, 4895, and a few others. Usually kept it in re-used powder cans with new labelling to identify contents. Still have a couple of dozen old powder containers sitting around in case of need, although it has been a long time since I have seen bulk powders offered (maybe something to do with modern fire codes and storage laws?).

    Last time I had to think about this was when doing a "buddy purchase" of a 8-lb. keg of pistol powder to be split with a friend. I had the necessary containers so I took my half and let him take home the canister. 8 pounds of pistol powder goes a long way! 5 - 7 grains per round means 1000 to 1400 rounds per pound!
    I just picked up 8 lbs of powder. 2.7 gr charge for 9mm. 2500+ loads to the pound!
    NRA Benefactor.

  14. #34
    Boolit Master LAH's Avatar
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    I'm shooting 4895 which is stored in a heavy mil plastic bag. It is surplus from years gone by.
    Joshua 1:9

  15. #35
    Boolit Grand Master Texas by God's Avatar
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    This has been stored in glass for quite awhile. As long as you don't drop it- appears to last ok. If they were smart, they would have transferred it to a plastic jar( once plastic was invented)...

    Sent from my SM-A716U using Tapatalk

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Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check