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Thread: Heat exhaustion.

  1. #1
    Boolit Master




    Idaho45guy's Avatar
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    Heat exhaustion.

    Got a touch of it today. I'm usually pretty good about slowing down before overdoing it, but since having Covid, I'm just not 100%.

    92 degrees today, which is the hottest day of the year so far. Had to mow my double lot, by hand, and was just about done when I bent over to re-fuel and about fell over I was so dizzy.

    Went inside and stuck my head under the kitchen faucet, drank a couple quarts of water, and went back outside to finish. Got done and now dizzy again and nauseous, so looked up signs of heat exhaustion and checked off all the boxes, lol.

    Sitting inside and stripped down under the ceiling fan, so finally cooling down and feeling better. No AC in my house, but it usually stays reasonably cool. Currently 78 degrees.

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    Anyone else had heat exhaustion or heat stroke?

    I was roofing in Iowa in the 90's and it was July, with 100 degree heat and high 90's humidity. All of us on the crew were in our 20's and bulletproof, except one tubby guy that drank too much the night before. He turned beet red, stopped sweating, and started mumbling incoherently before he collapsed. We started dousing him with a garden hose and called an ambulance. He spent a couple of days in the hospital. They said he was very close to permanent brain damage.
    "Luck don't live out here. Wolves don't kill the unlucky deer; they kill the weak ones..." Jeremy Renner in Wind River

  2. #2
    Boolit Buddy
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    Be careful from now on in case it was a heat stroke. Once you have had a heat stroke your are more prone to have them. My MIL can't work outside if it is over 80 degrees after she had hers 2 years ago.

  3. #3
    Boolit Grand Master
    Mk42gunner's Avatar
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    From what I remember, heat exhaustion is bad; but heat stroke can kill you. I can't remember the differences now, but if you stop sweating, it is serious.

    Robert

  4. #4
    Boolit Master MOA's Avatar
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    I got hit with it the first 2 months in mobile alabama. Moved from Tucson to mobile in July
    Was outside at a neighbors sighting in a couple of 22's. 90 degrees, 88%humidity. Sweat all over my arms but no evaporation due to the high humidity so no body cooling. Got a wicked stiff neck in about 30 seconds , nausea about 20 seconds later. Went an sat down under the carport and passed out. They got me into the house large glasses of ice water and sitting under a ceiling fan for one hour.

    Been living in the desert for 3 or 4 decades. Factors that later made it a no brainer for this to happen. Now over 60, humidity over 80 %, and temps above 85. Our older biological systems take longer to kick in and for us by the time they do we're already in trouble. I'm back in Arizona now but have not forgotten the lesson.

    And yes, heat stroke is worse an it can kill you without medical attention quickly given. Heat exhaustion left unchecked will end up as heat stroke. Take it from someone who was roiling out roofs in the Valley of the Sun in Phoenix in July and August at 125 degrees when I was a young 28 year old.
    .
    Last edited by MOA; 06-02-2021 at 08:24 PM.

  5. #5
    Boolit Grand Master


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    If it had been heat stroke, he'd have been in a hospital. You've stopped sweating before that point.

    I've always been a lot better at dealing with heat than cold. God knows the army had me in some hot places for extended periods of time. It really is about drinking water and staying out of direct sun as much as you can. I'll take triple digits over single digits any time.

    Someone mentioned when heat gets the better of you to drink a few swallows of dill pickle juice, I've done that, also salt water with some cider vinegar in it, sure seems to snap me out of it quicker than Gatorade and such. Straight water is what you really need to prevent it, though.

  6. #6
    Boolit Master



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    I remember back in the 1970's the military pushed salt tablets to avoid heat stress related problems. There would be bowls of salt tablets in the chow halls at places like 29 palms California. By the mid 1980's they (the military medical establishment) had moved to "Over Drink" as the methodology to prevent heat stress illness. The truth is; stay in the shade when possible, drink lot's of water (and Gator Aide too if you got it), wear clothing that keeps your limbs covered to protect from sunburn and to lessen the water being driven out of your skin by the sun.
    Mustang

    "In the beginning... the patriot is a scarce man, and brave and hated and scorned. When his cause succeeds, the timid join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot." - Mark Twain.

  7. #7
    Boolit Master




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    Quote Originally Posted by MUSTANG View Post
    I remember back in the 1970's the military pushed salt tablets to avoid heat stress related problems. There would be bowls of salt tablets in the chow halls at places like 29 palms California. By the mid 1980's they (the military medical establishment) had moved to "Over Drink" as the methodology to prevent heat stress illness. The truth is; stay in the shade when possible, drink lot's of water (and Gator Aide too if you got it), wear clothing that keeps your limbs covered to protect from sunburn and to lessen the water being driven out of your skin by the sun.
    I did training at Fort Irwin in the Mojave desert years ago and it was 128 degrees. We were told to drink a gallon of water every hour. We did, and still did not have to urinate more often than usual, and perhaps less so. We had a couple of guys go down to heat exhaustion there. Miserable place.
    "Luck don't live out here. Wolves don't kill the unlucky deer; they kill the weak ones..." Jeremy Renner in Wind River

  8. #8
    Boolit Master
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    Hand it once. Now i need to be very careful doing HVAC. If I get too hot I am done for the day. The leukemia sure doesn't help.

  9. #9
    Boolit Master

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    Friend of ours has a son stationed at Ft. Irwin!! Been by there many a time traveling down I-15

  10. #10
    Boolit Man
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    Not me but I have seen plenty of it. I’m a safety manager now, have been a safety professional since 2008 so 13 years in and I have took plenty folks to cool down, rehydrate, and a couple to get checked by an ER doc. Heat is like alcohol, in many ways. You don’t feel it until your too far along. Others can see it in you before you can. Staggering, dizziness, mumbling, mood swings... Be careful and you will be OK. Be stupid and you won’t be. Be in between and you get situations like was described in the start of this thread. Caffeine, sugar, alcohol, and pretty much every ...ine that’s in energy drinks makes it harder on somebody. Avoid those within reason and you significantly reduce your risks. Occasional breaks in shade further decreases risk. Cool water during a break is great. Cold air or cold water is bad as it can put you into shock, and the body can’t use cold water, it has to warm the water up a bit before it starts helping. Sure cold air and an icy drink feel good at the moment but it takes longer to get actual relief than shade and water that’s just a few degrees cooler than the air.

  11. #11
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    Earlier this spring I was helping my FIL try to load an old AC tractor and a few other items he was given and heat started to mess with me. I knew the signs as I had suffered from heat exhaustion back when I was working and again in 2019. Both of those times it was extreme and I though it was heart attack. So be very careful, if you don't catch it early it can at least scare you bad, at worst it can be life threatening. So happy you caught it and cooled yourself down.
    This is not the end. This not even the beginning of the end. But it is perhaps the end of the beginning! Winston Churchill, Nov. 1942

  12. #12
    Boolit Master

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    During my Summer at Parris Island, SC--- they told us all about, and we had to watch each other for signs of it.
    If someone went into heat stroke, they'd run ya over to sick bay and dunk ya in a tub of ice & water they kept for just such occasions.

    Most people don't know how much blood is in your head, and how good of a radiator/heat exchanger it is.
    In the classes I gave new flight crews for flying over cold water-- the first thing to tell them was not to take their helmet off.
    It trapped enough body heat to put off hypothermia and extend their chance of surviving the cold water by about another 50%.

    Years ago we had this horrible little punk working in the shop. He'd argue with a post.
    One of those people that won't let ya be nice to them.
    He got heat exhaustion one day, I told him to go run his head under the cold water at the deep sink.
    After listening to his nonsense a bit, I told him, "Go ahead and get brain damage--- nobody will notice the difference anyway".
    Political Correctness and the cancel culture is only allowed to exist because of the coward culture.


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  13. #13
    Boolit Master
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    Learned the salt tablet routine when our ship made the Westpac cruise '66-'67. Upper level in the pump room was minimum of 140 degrees and could only stand 2 hour watches. Swapped out with the messenger in the engineroom. Now I wear heavy long sleeve shirts, hydrate before I go out and bushog the back section. Heavy sunglasses to protect from UV. Frank

  14. #14
    Boolit Bub QuackAttack24's Avatar
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    I had it one day when I lived in Phoenix. I was in my late 20's and during the hot summer months, you could play all the golf you wanted for $4 at Papago Park, which is a good tournament quality public course. I didn't rent a cart and carried my bag. It was 110 degrees that day. After about 16 holes I felt like I was going to pass out. Suddenly I got weak and shaky, so I decided to quit and walk in. I literally had to drag my golf bag behind me down 17 and 18. Got back to the clubhouse and laid down under a shade tree. I fell asleep and woke up an hour later. One of the more stupid things I've done in my life.

    Monday, I decided to melt some range scrap into ingots and it was 92 degrees outside. Sitting by that pot scooping out the dross for a couple of hours I realized I was soaking wet with sweat and starting to feel shaky, so I called it quits before getting all the lead done. It sneaks up on you. Don't forget to HYDRATE!!!
    What could possibly go wrong?

  15. #15
    Boolit Grand Master

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    Was at a USPSA match in 2012 or 2013 on a day well over 100 degrees. I want to say 107, but that is really hot for this area, so let’s just stick with well over 100. Anyway, this particular range is all white gravel and white concrete "pit" walls… basically a huge reflector oven. We were all drinking much water and I didn’t see anyone hit the head. On stage 6, a half a dozen squad members walked up to me one at a time and asked me if I was alright.

    Pro tip… after the 3rd or 4th guy asks if you are alright, you probably aren’t alright. They got me into some shade and put some towels soaked in the cooler on the back of my neck and head. After a few minutes I felt good enough to limp to the car and turn the AC up. Another 15 minutes and I drove home. Was feeling much better by the end of the 40 minute trip.

    After that incident, I won’t go to a match when the temperature is supposed to hit 100.
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  16. #16
    Boolit Master


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    Quote Originally Posted by richhodg66 View Post
    If it had been heat stroke, he'd have been in a hospital. You've stopped sweating before that point.

    I've always been a lot better at dealing with heat than cold. God knows the army had me in some hot places for extended periods of time. It really is about drinking water and staying out of direct sun as much as you can. I'll take triple digits over single digits any time.

    Someone mentioned when heat gets the better of you to drink a few swallows of dill pickle juice, I've done that, also salt water with some cider vinegar in it, sure seems to snap me out of it quicker than Gatorade and such. Straight water is what you really need to prevent it, though.
    I am the same way. I also don't tan, but turn a reddish-brown. Finally wised up and stopped the burn/peel routine. Love the heat as I can move a lot easier but stuck with long sleeves, hat, and yea even gloves when using ride on lawnmower. Ex had given my one of my rx creams and had put some on the back of my hands. Of course the ones that say no direct sunlight. Got a very nasty burn that even 20 years later I can feel in direct sun. Be careful folks and for the younger ones, Newsflash - you are not bullet proof and will eventually have to pay the price.

  17. #17
    Boolit Master Garyshome's Avatar
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    Not for a while now since 2019. Dangerous stuff there. Always wear a hat and a long sleeve shirt when it's really hot.

  18. #18
    Boolit Buddy

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    I experienced it 3 times, first time when I was a teenager hauling and stacking hay, the other two times after I became a welder. Welder and Texas heat is a tough combination. Hasn't happened in years now, guess I'm a slow learner but I finally catch on, it put me in the hospital once. Contractors used to make fun of the big yard umbrella I carried on my truck, right up to the time they stepped under it, then I couldn't get them out from under it !!
    Keep your powder dry and watch your six !!

  19. #19
    Boolit Buddy
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    I've experienced early heatstroke symptoms once. I was loading brush into my trailer for a lady I do automotive work for, and it was approaching 100°, so I should have been more mindful, but I had not drank anything but coffee that morning before going to the task. Got a good sweat going, working hard for about 45 minutes, when I realized I was chilling, so I planned to take a break after the armload I had at the moment, then I blacked out for a spit second! I dropped everything and went to the water spigot and spent the next 30 minutes cooling off and hydrating. I was 56 or so at that time, and I have become more serious about hydration because of it. My wife, a nurse, gave me considerable, deserved grief over that episode!

  20. #20
    Boolit Master


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    Take a little Gatorade or other electrolyte with equal amounts of water. When I was working, I found I needed to up my salt intake in hot weather. Advise about susceptibility to repeat events is accurate.
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