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Thread: You've never heard of it?

  1. #61
    Boolit Master
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    Went into Academy once and couldn't find any 35 Remington. Deer in the headlights look. Said to try another store down the road that has the highest prices in town. Have about 5-6 of the caps you stick on oil filters. And about 3 different steel strap wrenches for different oil filters. Was in auto zone and the guy couldn't find the cap wrench for his oil filter. Since he had the new filter in hand we went over to the strap wrench section and found one that fit his oil filter. Still have my old timing light, yeah looks like something from Buck Rodgers. Frank

  2. #62
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    I still have all of my ignition wrenches, files for points, a timing light, dwell meter, vacuum gages, etc.
    As others have pointed out, it's been a long time since engines had things like mechanical points and carburetors.
    The last time I got a weird look from parts clerk was when I asked for a set of brushes for an alternator.

    I don't blame the clerks, most of them are just retail clerks trying to sell what the customer wants. In the suburban parts stores, about 95% of the time the clerk just needs to master a computer and cash register. In the past, the parts clerks were almost always mechanics. In the parts stores that are aimed at serving mechanics, many of the clerks still are mechanics. There's a huge difference in the counter staff needed at a parts store that is geared towards retail to car owners verses parts supply for a mechanic.

    And a 19 year old making near minimum wage is unlikely to make a career out of auto parts retail. The stores cannot keep employees, so the system has to be geared towards short training and high turnover rates. For the average customer in an auto parts store, a cashier behind the counter is all you need.

  3. #63
    Boolit Master VariableRecall's Avatar
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    While I'm blessed to have a dad that's taught them the basics of automotive maintenance and general handyman stuff, there's quite a lot of younger people like me that have never had that experience. I'm certain the majority of your problems with the kids in the Auto shops stem from the fact that they took the jobs because they were hands to run the teller, not exactly for their automotive experience.

    Come to think of it, most like these kid's family cars were all fuel injected in the first place with modern electrical systems from the get-go. Unless the mom or dad had an old beaut in the garage (Whose sizes are shrinking in general by the decade), They don't know anything else.

    Not to mention, most kids in general don't have much hands-on experience with cars outside of the steering wheel or the gas pump. There's certainly enthusiasts around, but even those don't go nearly as hands on as is required with a vehicle from the 70's.

    Another important factor is that most times any serious maintenance for vehicles these days are done at dealerships where more specialized technicians are doing the job instead of the customers. Engines aren't so easily removable as they used to as well.

  4. #64
    Boolit Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by WheelgunConvert View Post
    A handy use for valve grinding compound is to make Phillips head screwdrivers grip better. Just a little dab on the end of the tool will help keep the tool engaged without walking out. Works good for the power driver bits too.
    I seem to learn something every day, This is something I never heard of before, as old as I am I learn more things all the time.
    I will be 70 years old tomorrow and still learning!

  5. #65
    Boolit Master
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    Yep.The lapping compound on the Phillips screwdriver is an old one.I heard about it from an old mechanic when I was about 10 or 12 years old.He started his mechanicing career around 1913.
    Good luck.Have fun.Be safe.
    Leo
    People never lie so much as after a hunt,during a war,or before an election.
    Otto von Bismarck

  6. #66
    Boolit Master
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    That trick with the lapping compound and Phillips screw drivers is a real keeper!

    The problem I run into is even if you have a good parts person, they are hamstrung by their lack of resources. The chain store parts houses have orientated everything into a computer system. You tell them you are working on an earlier something and it’s not in the computer.

    Things is a gettin tougher every day!

    Three44s
    Quote Originally Posted by Bret4207

    ďThere is more to this than dumping lead in a hole.Ē

  7. #67
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    Reminds me of one time I wanted some motor oil
    asked the clerk for some 10w30 and his reply was
    we don't have any but we have this low30 (10w30)


    I was at the Ford dealer on a useless quest when a lady came in with her brand new car, bought there a month or two before, spoke to the parts manager and they went outside. I watched through the window as he opened the hood for her and pointed something out then closed it and came back in. He looked stunned when he told the other guy that she couldn't find the OIL dipstick to check it. All she could find was the 710 whatever that was. Other guy was too surprised to laugh, I just looked at them both also kinda speechless.

    Went into Academy once and couldn't find any 35 Remington.

    I went into a sports store when I was 12-14 or so. I needed ammo for deer season. Guy asked me what I had and I told him a Rem 742 Woodsmaster 308. He actually told me that all he had was 308 Winchester ammo. Won't that work? No, I needed 308 Remington ammo. He was serious. Worst was the guy at the counter who was talking to him. That clown just smirked and shook his head at the dumb kid who didn't know what he was talking about.
    Last edited by jonp; 05-01-2021 at 04:55 AM.
    I've got a fever and the only prescription is more cowbell

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  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by popper View Post
    `69 Ford Torino Terrible car. A thin dime works too but nobody's got one now, just paper bills.
    Starsky and Hutch do not approve of this comment.

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    ok, they used 74-76 Torino's.
    Last edited by jonp; 05-01-2021 at 05:11 AM.
    I've got a fever and the only prescription is more cowbell

    "Hell is other people"
    Jean-Paul Sartre

  9. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr_Sheesh View Post
    I guess I can add setting points up properly to the trash bin in my resume where I mention using keypunches, replacing keypunch ribbons, and emptying keypunch chaff boxes, sigh. Oh and toss carb rebuilding in there too? Ugh.
    That's a shame. In high school I rebuilt the 4 Barrel for my 72 Caprice Classic 402 on the kitchen table. While my grandmother was gone I might add.
    I've got a fever and the only prescription is more cowbell

    "Hell is other people"
    Jean-Paul Sartre

  10. #70
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    Guy I knew loved and used to rebuild Quadrajets frequently and would always end up with a couple parts left over.

    You're really supposed to have the metering needles there, inside the carb, inserted through the metering jet orifices, before you close the carb up, every single time.

    For some reason, he couldn't get it -facepalm-

    My first car was a "throw him into the water and see if he drowns" project, old VW that had a pranged engine, man did I learn a lot disassembling the engine, getting it machined, reassembling it, etc. It would have been easier with help, but that isn't the way of my family, seems.

  11. #71
    Boolit Master
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    Two things. Went into our Auto Zone and asked for a set of spark plugs for my 1974 MG-B. Now, nearly ALL the major chains carry basic tune up parts for MG-B's, Auto Zone included. Fella in his late 30's-early 40's asks, "who makes that?" I should have said Hudson or Packard but, I didn't. As many others have said, older guy behind parts counter is shaking his head. Teachable moment.

    Second. My wife used to spread mulch on her 18 flower beds every spring. Well....the years have taken their toll on both of us and we can't do it all these days. Soo..we called the Christian Campus House our church supports as they offer help of all kinds to those who need it. No pay is expected, ever. All they say is, if you can, donate something to the House. However, we use their services sort of frequently and as he Lord has blessed us greatly, the house receives a significant donation. We could probably hire it done cheaper but the benefit wouldn't be nearly so great. Anyway...I digress.

    I told the house manager to make sure he sent me a student who could drive a stick. So I'm getting ready to load mulch in my little dump truck and I shout, "Who here can drive a standard transmission?" Two responses received, identical, "I WISH"!! Not one of 8 engineering college students, from freshmen to seniors could drive a standard transmission. Wish I would have had time to teach one or more of them.

    Making change, don't get me started. It's one of the most rude things there is when a cashier gets the change out of the drawer, lays it on top of the receipt, hands it to you and says, "here".

    I am not convinced that the amount of new knowledge is equal to...or as useful for life, as the knowledge lost and being lost. My two boys do pretty good, they're 45 and 48. The oldest mostly grew up on the farm with my wife and I and took Vo-Ag in school. A very small, rural school. The youngest chose to stay with his mother but he was on the farm often enough he was exposed to and learned quite a bit of useful, life knowledge and, he does very well taking care of "stuff". Both are in the computer field for their careers and both have expressed gratitude for what they learned "on the farm". Neither would have any trouble following this conversation...and they can both drive standard transmissions. 'Course they could both do that by age 12. When the oldest bought his first automatic I got a huge laugh when he said the same thing I said when I bought my first automatic. First two days of driving it I about stomped a hole in the floor looking for the clutch.
    "In general, the art of government is to take as much money as possible from one class of citizens and give it to another class of citizens" Voltaire'

    The common virtue of capitalism is the sharing of equal opportunity. The common vice of socialism is the equal sharing of misery

    NRA Benefactor 2008

  12. #72
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    First two days of driving it I about stomped a hole in the floor looking for the clutch.
    I still do that occasionally, along with grabbing for the non-existent floor shifter to hit third gear.

    Robert

  13. #73
    Boolit Master
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    I'm old enough to remember points,roters,rotor capsetc Haven't driven a standard in years. My late uncle was a hard ass old yankee bought a new car went to show it him the minute he saw electronic ignition on the car told me to yank it out ( like that was possible) and replace it with points,condenser etc his reasoning if it dies it will be expensive to replace.
    I asked how much would I spend every 6 months replacing points etc compared to how often electronic ignition fails.
    Last edited by Mr_Sheesh; 05-03-2021 at 11:19 AM. Reason: Filter bypass

  14. #74
    Boolit Master
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    We have 7 licensed, registered vehicles and I bought Dad's Suzuki Carry after he passed away so call it 8 altogether. 5 are standard transmission. 'Course 3 of them are vintage MG's, one is a Morris Minor and the Suzuki is a standard transmission. So I still drive a stick every day. My 2017 Mercedes gets driven the least of them all.
    "In general, the art of government is to take as much money as possible from one class of citizens and give it to another class of citizens" Voltaire'

    The common virtue of capitalism is the sharing of equal opportunity. The common vice of socialism is the equal sharing of misery

    NRA Benefactor 2008

  15. #75
    Boolit Grand Master


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    I avoid a lot of hassle, wasted time and save money by buying stuff like this on Amazon. Closest auto parts store is 25 miles away.
    Don Verna

    NRA Endowment Member

  16. #76
    Boolit Master




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    My coworker showed up with this today...

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    He's had it since he was 14. He's 27 now. Dad bought it for him. I went out to look at it and popped the hood and he had no idea what anything was. Didn't know what transmission it had, didn't know how to adjust the idle on the carb, or even what carb it had (Edlebrock Performer 600 cfm). I was shocked by how little he actually knew about the car and how to keep it running. Engine was filthy and lots of oil leaks. Carb also needed rebuilt as it was leaking pretty bad.

    I don't know... When I was his age and had muscle cars, I knew just about everything about them and how to maintain them. Even a kid that owns one nowadays doesn't know a fraction about them as kids back in my day. Sad.
    "Luck don't live out here. Wolves don't kill the unlucky deer; they kill the weak ones..." Jeremy Renner in Wind River

  17. #77
    Boolit Master

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    Quote Originally Posted by sharps4590 View Post
    "Who here can drive a standard transmission?" Two responses received, identical, "I WISH"!!
    My next door neighbor frequently loans out his pick up to other neighbors.
    None of our neighbors ever ask to borrow mine.
    I figure it's because it has a six speed manual trans.
    Political Correctness and the cancel culture is only allowed to exist because of the coward culture.


    In school: We learn lessons, and are given tests.
    In life: We are given tests, and learn lessons.

  18. #78
    Boolit Man
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    Iím disgusted with my generation and ashamed of the younger ones. Folks barely half my age are graduating from high school right now, and about 98% of them canít work their way out of a math problem without consulting their trusty cellphone 8 times and asking somebody else for the answer. Itís to a point where I just order what I need and select the pick up in store option. More than a few times I have been told it took a while to find something.

    More frustrating though are the simple things that arenít sold anymore. I replaced a sink and needed a new paper gasket for the disposal drain fitting. Itís a $0.31 cent part online, with $6.99 shipping and it will be here in 2 weeks. The sink got a rubber gasket that fit well enough. That was far better than the reducer for my old outboard motor fuel line which just isnít sold anymore at all. On the bright side though, I have a few guns now that should have cost far more than I paid and all I had to do was a detail cleaning and some very minor repairs. I do have a mill now to make parts on when I can no longer find what I need.

  19. #79
    Boolit Master

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    They donít know what a timing light is either!
    NRA Endowment member
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  20. #80
    Boolit Master
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    Had a counter jumper that did`nt know what a scribe was either.
    Good luck.Have fun.Be safe.
    Leo
    People never lie so much as after a hunt,during a war,or before an election.
    Otto von Bismarck

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Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check