RepackboxInline FabricationTitan ReloadingMidSouth Shooters Supply
Lee PrecisionADvertise hereReloading UKRotoMetals2

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 39

Thread: Thought My Gunsmithing Lathe Had Given Up The Ghost

  1. #1
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    What the world calls "Global Warming", we in Arizona call "Summer Time."
    Posts
    1,981

    Thought My Gunsmithing Lathe Had Given Up The Ghost

    The metal lathe that I've owned for a little over a decade now recently quit running.

    After some troubleshooting I found that my ON/OFF switch had failed. To be more specific, the plastic housing that contained the metal contacts of the ON/OFF switch is what actually failed.

    It appeared that the plastic housing had gotten brittle enough over time that the small tabs that secured the overall component in it's place had just cracked and broken off.

    Since my lathe was as old as it was, when I called the seller's customer support I was informed that there was now a version-2 of that same component. Unfortunately for me, that "Version-2" was NOT interchangeable with the older version that came with my lathe back when I bought it new.

    They did also have the "Original Version" (so they claimed) but that "Original Version" looked nothing like the ON/OFF switch that had just gone bad on me.

    Rather than ordering it and taking the chance of it not fitting I opted to try to just model some replacement parts in my CAD software and then 3D printing them instead.

    It took me three separate tries to get them to print out just right but eventually I got them to fit and function perfectly; and all for pennies on the dollar compared to the price of an OEM replacement part.

    The factory replacement ON/OFF switch that they had in stock for my specific lathe was now a cylindrical shape. The OEM factory component that had gone bad on me was more of a dual rectangular shape. I most likely could have gotten their OEM replacement component to work even if it didn't fit perfectly but I was afraid of just making more work for myself so, 3D printing saved the day.

    My lathe is back up and running again.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Lathe1.jpg 
Views:	65 
Size:	168.3 KB 
ID:	281387   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Lathe2.jpg 
Views:	72 
Size:	190.5 KB 
ID:	281388   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	LatheElectrical.jpg 
Views:	64 
Size:	35.8 KB 
ID:	281389  

  2. #2
    Moderator

    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    The Pacific NorthWet
    Posts
    3,505
    Great!

  3. #3
    Boolit Master


    MrWolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    NE West Virginia
    Posts
    3,371
    Nice job. Keep saying I have to learn freecad. I have to many custom prints I want to do or to even recode someone else's.

  4. #4
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    4,299
    Ah, ....... Self reliance. Nothing like it. Good on you.

  5. #5
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    What the world calls "Global Warming", we in Arizona call "Summer Time."
    Posts
    1,981
    Thanks guys. I wanted show you all what I meant by the difference in shape or appearance of my existing component gone bad and the new replacement component but I didn't really know how to download the photos showing that specific part for comparison.

    https://www.grizzly.com/parts/grizzl...-v1/p4003g0919

    If you're curios you can take a look for yourself. Look at my existing rectangular component and the cylindrical component that Grizzly was recommending. I'm fairly sure it would have worked. Even if I had to make it work I could have probably done it. The price difference of a few cents as opposed to several dollars kind of tipped the scales toward me trying to fix it on my own.

    HollowPoint

  6. #6
    Boolit Master

    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Lewiston, Idaho
    Posts
    2,287
    I had an older lathe that the switch went out on. There are several switches that work the same way from places like McMaster Carr or Granger. They may not fit in the same hole but thats what I had to do about 20 years back. That lathe went away for downsizing. I suppose my 30 year old Grizzly will need a new switch someday.

  7. #7
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    What the world calls "Global Warming", we in Arizona call "Summer Time."
    Posts
    1,981
    Quote Originally Posted by John Taylor View Post
    I had an older lathe that the switch went out on. There are several switches that work the same way from places like McMaster Carr or Granger. They may not fit in the same hole but thats what I had to do about 20 years back. That lathe went away for downsizing. I suppose my 30 year old Grizzly will need a new switch someday.
    I guess the Arizona heat just did a number on that thin plastic switch-housing over time. I just didn't realize how thin that plastic was until I took it apart. Most likely it was designed under the assumption that the lathe would be in an air conditioned shop; or at least a shop with some cooling present.

    When I'm not using my lathe it just sits in whatever ambient temperatures happen to be present. At any rate, it's fixed now; and now it's on to the next project.

    HollowPoint

  8. #8
    Boolit Master Scrounge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    OKC Metro
    Posts
    839
    Quote Originally Posted by HollowPoint View Post
    The metal lathe that I've owned for a little over a decade now recently quit running.

    After some troubleshooting I found that my ON/OFF switch had failed. To be more specific, the plastic housing that contained the metal contacts of the ON/OFF switch is what actually failed.

    It appeared that the plastic housing had gotten brittle enough over time that the small tabs that secured the overall component in it's place had just cracked and broken off.

    Since my lathe was as old as it was, when I called the seller's customer support I was informed that there was now a version-2 of that same component. Unfortunately for me, that "Version-2" was NOT interchangeable with the older version that came with my lathe back when I bought it new.

    They did also have the "Original Version" (so they claimed) but that "Original Version" looked nothing like the ON/OFF switch that had just gone bad on me.

    Rather than ordering it and taking the chance of it not fitting I opted to try to just model some replacement parts in my CAD software and then 3D printing them instead.

    It took me three separate tries to get them to print out just right but eventually I got them to fit and function perfectly; and all for pennies on the dollar compared to the price of an OEM replacement part.

    The factory replacement ON/OFF switch that they had in stock for my specific lathe was now a cylindrical shape. The OEM factory component that had gone bad on me was more of a dual rectangular shape. I most likely could have gotten their OEM replacement component to work even if it didn't fit perfectly but I was afraid of just making more work for myself so, 3D printing saved the day.

    My lathe is back up and running again.
    Nicely done! Now I have even more motivation to learn to do such things. I've got a 3D printer sitting idle here because I don't know how to design stuff for 3D printing yet. I had a student license for Solidworks for two years running, and couldn't figure it out. Not that I got much time to try...

    Bill

  9. #9
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    What the world calls "Global Warming", we in Arizona call "Summer Time."
    Posts
    1,981
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrounge View Post
    Nicely done! Now I have even more motivation to learn to do such things. I've got a 3D printer sitting idle here because I don't know how to design stuff for 3D printing yet. I had a student license for Solidworks for two years running, and couldn't figure it out. Not that I got much time to try...

    Bill
    If you want to just get some practice 3D printing just go over to the thingiverse website. You can download print files for free. Those files include all manner of stuff, not just useless toys and trinkets.

    I usually model my own stuff but just recently I downloaded some injection molds for soft plastic fishing baits. I have plenty of my own designs already but I kind of liked some of the ones that other guys have posted too.

    In regard to the SolidWorks CAD software; several years ago I bought a used laptop from a retiring engineer. The laptop had the SolidWorks version 10 still on it. I eventually figured out how to use it just well enough to model some of my own ideas. I've been using that older version ever since. I could never afford the price of the upgraded versions of this same software.

    HollowPoint

  10. #10
    Moderator

    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    The Pacific NorthWet
    Posts
    3,505
    Scrounge, the other thing you can do is ask (Special Projects is the place) for help designing things you need, I can turn out some things very fast (Mixtures of simple geometrical shapes like switch boxes, reels to roll rope up on, knobs, protective flashlight holders, etc. are fast with proper measurements, a clear idea of what's needed, and OpenSCAD. Probably other software for other folks, I just have been using the one.)

    In hot climes I wouldn't suggest regular PLA as it gets melty, ABS or that "PLA Plus"? or whatever it is should be far better.

  11. #11
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    What the world calls "Global Warming", we in Arizona call "Summer Time."
    Posts
    1,981
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr_Sheesh View Post
    Scrounge, the other thing you can do is ask (Special Projects is the place) for help designing things you need, I can turn out some things very fast (Mixtures of simple geometrical shapes like switch boxes, reels to roll rope up on, knobs, protective flashlight holders, etc. are fast with proper measurements, a clear idea of what's needed, and OpenSCAD. Probably other software for other folks, I just have been using the one.)

    In hot climes I wouldn't suggest regular PLA as it gets melty, ABS or that "PLA Plus"? or whatever it is should be far better.
    For this ON/OFF switch project I used my filament printer cause simple ABS filament had just the right amount of give to it so as not to break when I pushed those plastic tabs over the corresponding extrusions that my 3D printed parts clipped onto.

    I also have a resin 3D printer that I use for more elaborate prints. With resin printing it's possible to mix resins that have different properties to get a finished print that is both tough as well as flexible if that's the desired attribute one is looking for.

    Luckily the cheap and simple filament ABS did the trick this time around. For 3D printing the injection molds for my fishing lures I use a high heat resistant resin.

    Following is a link to a photo of some tadpole injection molds I made not to long ago. The sky's the limit as to all the things you can print with these types of printers.

    https://www.instagram.com/p/CD4mMRhhgbL/

    HollowPoint

  12. #12
    Boolit Master



    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Southern France by way of Interior Bush Alaska
    Posts
    2,797
    3D printing is starting to get very popular. I wonder if I might find the time/courage to get into it.

  13. #13
    Boolit Master


    MrWolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    NE West Virginia
    Posts
    3,371
    Quote Originally Posted by GregLaROCHE View Post
    3D printing is starting to get very popular. I wonder if I might find the time/courage to get into it.
    Even i can do it - printing that is. I have found a lot of storage ideas in finally getting all my junk together in my tool box. Printed wrench holders, socket holders (make mine black for sae and blue for metric. Same with wrench one), bit holders, etc. GF bought herself an electronic piano and I found a really nice headphone stand with musical note on top. Made it with shiny copper color pla. Came out nice and she loved it. I am just learning about different filament types as I am using up what I have on hand. There is even a storage drawer setup for the empty spools on Thingiverse. I really need to learn to program myself so I can make changes and my own designs. Hehe someday. Finding out what your printer likes as settings was the hardest for me. Started out fine but after a few prints I had adhesion issues, etc. Finally got everything straightened out and printing almost 24/7 it seems.
    Ron

  14. #14
    Boolit Master



    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Southern France by way of Interior Bush Alaska
    Posts
    2,797
    I was under the impression that it was on the expensive side to use. Is it?

  15. #15
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    What the world calls "Global Warming", we in Arizona call "Summer Time."
    Posts
    1,981
    Quote Originally Posted by GregLaROCHE View Post
    I was under the impression that it was on the expensive side to use. Is it?
    It can be very expensive if that's the route you decide to take. With filament printing I just use the cheaper filament they sell on ebay it takes a few failed prints to get the cheap filament dialed in to your particular printer but once you get there you can get some decent prints. This may be a poor analogy but, it's kind of like working up loads for a given gun, except that you're working with temperatures and layer sizes rather than powder, bullets, cases and primers.

    With resin printers, things can get real expensive real quick so there too I look for the cheapest resins I can find that happen to have the attributes I need for a given project. Back when I first purchased my resin printer I was extremely fortunate in that I joined one of many Facebook groups that revolve around a particular resin manufacturer.

    I wanted to start making my own soft plastic fishing lures so I forked over my hard earned money to buy some high heat resistant resin. I think it cost me about thirty-eight bucks plus tax and shipping for what I consider to be a very small amount. Well, I started posting my designs and my finished prints as well as some photos of the fish I caught using my home made lures. The Siraya Tech Resin manufacturer took notice of them so they contacted me to ask if I'd like to participate in some field testing of some of their new offerings before they were introduced onto the market. Heck Yea; I couldn't turn this offer down.

    They sent me out close to two-hundred and fifty bucks worth of high heat resistant resins. Both resins turned out to be some awesome stuff. One is now marketed under the name of Siraya Tech Ultra White which sells for around 75-bucks per 500ml and the other is Siraya Tech Clear Sculpt resin. It sells for around 36-38-bucks per 500ml; and this is before tax and shipping. I've just about used up all the free resin I was sent. I'll have to start buying my own resin again unless I can come up with some more eye catching designs that might motivate this manufacture to send out more freebees.

    They generally only do this when they're getting ready to introduce a new resin onto the market.

    I've made several gun related items with their Siraya Tech Blu resin. It's very touch resin. I've made extended magazines for my Tikka T3 varmint rifle, dedicated air gun suppressors, Daisy Red Ryder BB gun scope mount and things like that.

    https://www.instagram.com/p/CHGhUVQBDja/

    https://www.instagram.com/p/CBQyv3aB9RU/

    If you have a good imagination and a 3D printer you can keep yourself busy for quite a while.

    HollowPoint
    Last edited by HollowPoint; 04-19-2021 at 11:51 AM.

  16. #16
    Boolit Grand Master


    missionary5155's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Back in ILL-Nois for some months
    Posts
    6,415
    That is good news.
    I enjoy individuals who tackle the problem and fix it.
    Mike in LLama for 6 more weeks
    "Come unto Me, all you who labor and are heavy burdened, and I will give you rest." Matthew 11:28
    Male Guanaco out in dry lakebed at 10,800 feet south of Arequipa.

  17. #17
    Boolit Master Scrounge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    OKC Metro
    Posts
    839
    Quote Originally Posted by HollowPoint View Post
    If you want to just get some practice 3D printing just go over to the thingiverse website. You can download print files for free. Those files include all manner of stuff, not just useless toys and trinkets.

    I usually model my own stuff but just recently I downloaded some injection molds for soft plastic fishing baits. I have plenty of my own designs already but I kind of liked some of the ones that other guys have posted too.

    In regard to the SolidWorks CAD software; several years ago I bought a used laptop from a retiring engineer. The laptop had the SolidWorks version 10 still on it. I eventually figured out how to use it just well enough to model some of my own ideas. I've been using that older version ever since. I could never afford the price of the upgraded versions of this same software.

    HollowPoint
    I've printed PLA versions of the metric change gears for my 7x mini-lathe from Thingiverse, but I've also got an Atlas TH42 that needs 16DP gears, and an SB Heavy 10L that I'll want similar gears for once it's restored. Was just starting to play with ABS when my job changed, and then evaporated, and I've been stuck home recovering from back problems for both myself and SWMBO, more or less since. Just as I got started working effectively in the workshop getting it cleaned up and organized, had new problems pop up, which appear to be related to my moving her wheelchair in and out of the truck of our car. Today I bought a transport wheelchair that I can pick up with one hand. Can't do that with her old Invacare Tracer IV. It's 60 or 70lbs.

    I'd gathered all the material to experiment with acetone vapor smoothing on the gears, which for the Atlas would be around 9" diameter, and more than 24 hours of print time. I've got a couple of small milling machines here, I may go that route for making gears. It's possible to make your own gear cutters, to approximate them on either a shaper or mill, and to mill or shape the perfect involute shape, with the right equipment. One way or another I'll get it figured out and done. Also need to spend some time playing with FreeCad, and doing the tutorials.

    On SolidWorks, if you're a veteran or student you can get the student version. It's actually last years, or the previous year's full version, $20 for Vets, not sure what it is for students, though I'm currently a student in a machining class at the local technical college. You need to practice with it, too. Couldn't seem to get started.

  18. #18
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    What the world calls "Global Warming", we in Arizona call "Summer Time."
    Posts
    1,981
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrounge View Post
    I've printed PLA versions of the metric change gears for my 7x mini-lathe from Thingiverse, but I've also got an Atlas TH42 that needs 16DP gears, and an SB Heavy 10L that I'll want similar gears for once it's restored. Was just starting to play with ABS when my job changed, and then evaporated, and I've been stuck home recovering from back problems for both myself and SWMBO, more or less since. Just as I got started working effectively in the workshop getting it cleaned up and organized, had new problems pop up, which appear to be related to my moving her wheelchair in and out of the truck of our car. Today I bought a transport wheelchair that I can pick up with one hand. Can't do that with her old Invacare Tracer IV. It's 60 or 70lbs.

    I'd gathered all the material to experiment with acetone vapor smoothing on the gears, which for the Atlas would be around 9" diameter, and more than 24 hours of print time. I've got a couple of small milling machines here, I may go that route for making gears. It's possible to make your own gear cutters, to approximate them on either a shaper or mill, and to mill or shape the perfect involute shape, with the right equipment. One way or another I'll get it figured out and done. Also need to spend some time playing with FreeCad, and doing the tutorials.

    On SolidWorks, if you're a veteran or student you can get the student version. It's actually last years, or the previous year's full version, $20 for Vets, not sure what it is for students, though I'm currently a student in a machining class at the local technical college. You need to practice with it, too. Couldn't seem to get started.
    I have a CNC hobby mill in my cramped home shop. I used to do all of my projects in metal (mostly aluminum) with that little Tormach 770. It mostly just sits ever since buying the 3D printers. I still use that mill when I run out of the air rifle triggers parts that I make and sell. I've only been having to make one large batch of those air gun parts about once a year. That's about how long it takes to sell them all.

    I'm going to have to break down and start using that CNC mill more this year or I'll forget how to use it all together.

    I've found that this older version of SolidWorks has gotten me by OK. The only way I'd upgrade at this point is if I found myself badly needing one of the newer features that the newer versions of SolidWorks now have. I'll just make due with what I have for now.

    HollowPoint

  19. #19
    Boolit Master Scrounge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    OKC Metro
    Posts
    839
    Quote Originally Posted by HollowPoint View Post
    I have a CNC hobby mill in my cramped home shop. I used to do all of my projects in metal (mostly aluminum) with that little Tormach 770. It mostly just sits ever since buying the 3D printers. I still use that mill when I run out of the air rifle triggers parts that I make and sell. I've only been having to make one large batch of those air gun parts about once a year. That's about how long it takes to sell them all.

    I'm going to have to break down and start using that CNC mill more this year or I'll forget how to use it all together.

    I've found that this older version of SolidWorks has gotten me by OK. The only way I'd upgrade at this point is if I found myself badly needing one of the newer features that the newer versions of SolidWorks now have. I'll just make due with what I have for now.

    HollowPoint
    For what you're doing it makes perfect sense. I finally gave up on Solidworks, and have downloaded & installed FreeCad. If I can learn how to use it even a bit I'll be fine. If I manage to get good with it, I might try Solidworks again. I flunked mechanical drawing back in the pencil & T-square days. Hope I can do better on a computer. No bets though.

    Bill

  20. #20
    Boolit Master



    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Southern France by way of Interior Bush Alaska
    Posts
    2,797
    You guys have started to get me interested in 3D printing. Maybe it’s not that hard or necessarily that expensive. I really know nothing about it. Can someone suggest some of the better basic/introductory videos available? Thanks

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check