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Thread: Where these Nosler Bullets made on a lathe?

  1. #1
    Boolit Buddy pertnear's Avatar
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    Where these Nosler Bullets made on a lathe?

    I remember hearing that Nosler bullets were originally turned on a lathe. I found these at a gun show. The guy had about 6 boxes (NOS). I bought a box just for curiosity sake. They were $15. Any comments about these?
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  2. #2
    Boolit Master
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    I'd go back and buy the other 5 boxes. . Don't know about their origins, but the they look good to me.

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    Boolit Master
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    I would sincerely doubt that they were made on a lathe - the "partition" part of the label infers that they have a jacket that is separated (partitioned) into a front and rear part, generally around 70% of the bullet length back from the nose.
    But I agree, buy the rest.

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    https://www.americanrifleman.org/art...ler-partition/

    Using a lathe in a corner of his small shop, Nosler turned sections of copper rod to a diameter of 0.308" and, after it was cut to the desired lengths, cavities drilled into both ends were stopped short enough to leave a solid partition between them. Serving as an expansion arrestor, the partition would retain a high percentage of a bullet’s original weight. To aid expansion of the front section, a tapered reamer was used to thin the front end of its wall while leaving it thicker back toward the partition. The front and rear cavities of the first batch of bullets were filled by hand with molten lead, and after the cores had cooled, dies in a hand-operated press were used to swage the bullets to their final shape. Those first bullets were hollowpoints..................................



    Up until 1952, the jackets of all Partition bullets had been made from copper rod, and during that year a switch was made to tubing consisting of 90 percent copper and 10 percent zinc. An automatic screw machine cut the tubing to the required length and tapered the wall at the end that would become the front of the bullet. Then, opposing punches in a hydraulic press simultaneously reached inside each jacket from both ends to displace enough material to form a partition where they met. This forming method left a small hole in the center of the partition. Another machine cut a relief groove into the jacket at the partition. The hollow-point style was replaced by a soft point with the front core exposed at the nose as seen on the Partition bullet today.
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  5. #5
    Boolit Master

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    No.......they weren’t made on a lathe.

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    Boolit Buddy pertnear's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 725 View Post
    I'd go back and buy the other 5 boxes. . Don't know about their origins, but the they look good to me.
    Quote Originally Posted by cwtebay View Post
    I would sincerely doubt that they were made on a lathe - the "partition" part of the label infers that they have a jacket that is separated (partitioned) into a front and rear part, generally around 70% of the bullet length back from the nose.
    But I agree, buy the rest.
    I bought the bullets several years ago at a small local show. I didn't even own a 6mm caliber rifle then. They just looked curious to me. In hindsight they'd of been a good buy. As a matter of fact I'm sure the fella would have given me a discount if I'd of bought all 6 boxes.

    If I get a little more energetic I'll section one lengthwise to take a good look inside.
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  7. #7
    Boolit Master
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    They should look something like this photo (stolen from Nosler website). Heavier grain /larger caliber bullets have a solid brass base.

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    Quote Originally Posted by M-Tecs View Post
    https://www.americanrifleman.org/art...ler-partition/

    Using a lathe in a corner of his small shop, Nosler turned sections of copper rod to a diameter of 0.308" and, after it was cut to the desired lengths, cavities drilled into both ends were stopped short enough to leave a solid partition between them. Serving as an expansion arrestor, the partition would retain a high percentage of a bullet’s original weight. To aid expansion of the front section, a tapered reamer was used to thin the front end of its wall while leaving it thicker back toward the partition. The front and rear cavities of the first batch of bullets were filled by hand with molten lead, and after the cores had cooled, dies in a hand-operated press were used to swage the bullets to their final shape. Those first bullets were hollowpoints..................................



    Up until 1952, the jackets of all Partition bullets had been made from copper rod, and during that year a switch was made to tubing consisting of 90 percent copper and 10 percent zinc. An automatic screw machine cut the tubing to the required length and tapered the wall at the end that would become the front of the bullet. Then, opposing punches in a hydraulic press simultaneously reached inside each jacket from both ends to displace enough material to form a partition where they met. This forming method left a small hole in the center of the partition. Another machine cut a relief groove into the jacket at the partition. The hollow-point style was replaced by a soft point with the front core exposed at the nose as seen on the Partition bullet today.
    That's very interesting!!! I wouldn't have guessed that!

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  9. #9
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    Those are some of John Noslers first Partition bullets.
    He was making them in Ashland, Or at the time.
    I shot a lot of big game with this type of Partition bullets.

  10. #10
    Boolit Buddy pete501's Avatar
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    Box says Bend Oregon

  11. #11
    Boolit Master

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    Nosler made bullets in Ashland before they moved to Bend.

  12. #12
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    These were made in Ashland, Oregon. The relief groove has a kind of "lathe turned" look to it.

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    This was a partial box of .270 130 grainers.

  13. #13
    Boolit Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by M-Tecs View Post
    https://www.americanrifleman.org/art...ler-partition/

    Using a lathe in a corner of his small shop, Nosler turned sections of copper rod to a diameter of 0.308" and, after it was cut to the desired lengths, cavities drilled into both ends were stopped short enough to leave a solid partition between them. Serving as an expansion arrestor, the partition would retain a high percentage of a bullet’s original weight. To aid expansion of the front section, a tapered reamer was used to thin the front end of its wall while leaving it thicker back toward the partition. The front and rear cavities of the first batch of bullets were filled by hand with molten lead, and after the cores had cooled, dies in a hand-operated press were used to swage the bullets to their final shape. Those first bullets were hollowpoints..................................



    Up until 1952, the jackets of all Partition bullets had been made from copper rod, and during that year a switch was made to tubing consisting of 90 percent copper and 10 percent zinc. An automatic screw machine cut the tubing to the required length and tapered the wall at the end that would become the front of the bullet. Then, opposing punches in a hydraulic press simultaneously reached inside each jacket from both ends to displace enough material to form a partition where they met. This forming method left a small hole in the center of the partition. Another machine cut a relief groove into the jacket at the partition. The hollow-point style was replaced by a soft point with the front core exposed at the nose as seen on the Partition bullet today.
    Nosler's first large numbers of bullet jackets were made on automatic screw machines, a kind of automated lathe. I doubt today's partition bullets are any better projectiles but they are surely faster and less costly to produce now.

    We have many excellent bullets today but, IMHO, Nosler partitions were and still are the best all-around game bullets for this part of the world. But dead is dead and there are many instances where plain ol' "cup and core" bullets are equally deadly and much less expensive.

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