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Thread: Phil Sharpe

  1. #41
    Boolit Master
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    We can learn a lot from the oltimers and as one of them used to often say to me- we can also learn how NOT to do it as well!

  2. #42
    Boolit Grand Master uscra112's Avatar
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    We can only criticize them because we have so much instrumentation they didn't have. Chronographs we can buy out of pocket money cost six months' wages in 1940. Even gunwriters often judged pressure by bolt lift and case expansion. Even the factory labs had only the copper crusher method, which tells ypu nothong about rise time and rate of decay. The only computer they had was a slide rule. Of COURSE they did a lot of things we think are crazy.....now.
    Cognitive Dissident

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by uscra112 View Post
    The only computer they had was a slide rule. Of COURSE they did a lot of things we think are crazy.....now.
    Yeah. And with those silly ol' slide rules they produced the A bomb, supersonic airplanes, took us to the moon and back, and - would you believe? - produced computers. All things considered, those old guy's records aren't too shabby. (And they were smart enough to have no confusion about needing to stand or sit on urinals! )

  4. #44
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    1hole, going to think I’m a real caveman; I only have a KJB and still use slide rule.

    Click image for larger version. 

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  5. #45
    Boolit Grand Master uscra112's Avatar
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    I can't say I use it, but i know where mine is. An aluminum K&E that I bought when I was in high school (class of '63). We geeks all had leather scabbards, and wore them on our belts like gunfighters.

    Very old joke: Ask an engineer what's two times two. Answer: About four.







    ;
    Cognitive Dissident

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by dannyd View Post
    1hole, going to think I’m a real caveman; I only have a KJB and still use slide rule.
    Danny, if you know how to use them correctly then you have all most folk will ever need.

    Four function pocket calculators with memory were available from HP and TI in the early 70s for about $400 (and up) but they have been available for $1 each for decades now; they stay in my shirt pocket much better than slide rules, and liquid crystal displays are MUCH easier to read! My old slide rules are still around here somewhere but it's been so long since I used one I fear I have forgotten how ... and I don't care.

    Bottom line, old stuff such as slide rules and the KJV was and remains usable but somewhat like digital TV, cell phones and the NKJV, the newer stuff we worked so long and hard to develop really is better in every way.

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by uscra112 View Post
    I can't say I use it, but i know where mine is. An aluminum K&E that I bought when I was in high school (class of '63). We geeks all had leather scabbards, and wore them on our belts like gunfighters.

    Very old joke: Ask an engineer what's two times two. Answer: About four.




    ;

    I bought a K&E mahogany rule when I was a freshman engineering student in 1960. Couldn't afford a new one so I bought a used one in a pawn shop on Beale Street in Memphis, TN. It was stolen along with some books when I was a Jr at UT. I found one of the books in a used book store a couple of days later when shopping to replace the ones that were stolen. Reported it to administration and they came down on the bookstore and got me my books and they identified the one that sold them. To stay out of court, he reimbursed me for the slide rule. The book store had already supplied me with replacement books. I then bought a Post Versalog rule. Used that for a few years until I could afford a "scientific" calculator. Still have it, mostly as an item of interest for grandchildren.8
    John
    W.TN

  8. #48
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    I have three copies, one with the paper dust cover, There is great information in there, IN todays world that book would run into the hundreds of dollars. Great story on the development of the 357 Mag to. Lots of loading information, Good info on wildcat cartridges to.

  9. #49
    Around 1989-1990 I was visiting used bookshops in southern PA, eastern MD, and northern VA and found an actual treasure trove of vintage gun books in one particular store. I made a huge pile and the shop owner made me a heck of a deal, because the genre moved slowly for him.

    There were titles from the Standard Publishing Co, and Samworth's Small Arms Technical Publishing Co. A number of them were from Phil Sharpe's personal library. Copies of his thick "Rifle" and "Handloading" books are heavily annotated by Sharpe in red pencil, as are copies of "Hatcher's Notebook" and "The Book of the Garand," the margins of both which are full of red pencil notations next to underlined text. The notations range from simple "Agree!!!" and "Wrong!!!" to a few longer scribbles that start with "Shame on you, Julian!!!" and continue on with what Sharpe thought was mistaken in Julian Hatcher's books. I read them cover to cover, and the still reside in my personal library.

    These books tend to make me believe that Sharpe was as narcissistic as earlier posts make him out to be.

    Noah

  10. #50
    Boolit Grand Master uscra112's Avatar
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    Having made a haul like that, what can you do for an encore?
    Cognitive Dissident

  11. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1hole View Post
    Four function pocket calculators with memory were available from HP and TI in the early 70s for about $400 (and up) but they have been available for $1 each for decades now

    My old slide rules are still around here somewhere but it's been so long since I used one I fear I have forgotten how ...
    So much this. I keep an old vernier scale caliper in our shop to measure rod, drill bits and other odd steel shape that holding a tape measure to is more a guess than a measure. The young guys in the shop think I'm an antiquated old duck when I drag it out but more than once I've proved their eye's aren't any better than my own. I tried to explain to one of the fella's how to read it and his eye's just started rolling back in his head. I asked him for his phone. When he handed it to me I held both together and said, "You have more computing power here than the men and women who designed and built the machinery that won WWII and took us to the moon had, and the best you guys seem to be able to do with it is watch the idiot things people do on Tic Toc. I handed his phone back and thought to myself, I have become the grumpy old b*****d I complained of my Dad being.

  12. #52
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    But it does take years of experience to arrive at this advanced way of thinking.
    It is far to easy to pick up electronics and stand on the shoulders of the scientists and engineers who understood the possibilities and ramifications of whether it could be done and sometimes whether it should be done.
    "New" does not mean better. But does mean time will tell.
    Our 1870 #2 Frank Wesson chambered in 44 Wesson still terminates groundhogs just as well as it ever did.
    "Come unto Me, all you who labor and are heavy burdened, and I will give you rest." Matthew 11:28
    Male Guanaco out in dry lakebed at 10,800 feet south of Arequipa.

  13. #53
    Boolit Grand Master Char-Gar's Avatar
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    It is the content and not the personality that matters. We should have learned this from Trump.
    Disclaimer: The above is not holy writ. It is just my opinion based on my experience and knowledge. Your mileage may vary.

  14. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Char-Gar View Post
    It is the content and not the personality that matters. We should have learned this from Trump.
    It's just like Hard Preachers; People listen to the Tone of his voice and not the message "sad".

  15. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by kidmma View Post
    I have a copy of "The Complete Guide to Handloading" by Phil Sharpe. Last edited in 1949.

    Attachment 230450 Attachment 230451

    Attachment 230449 Attachment 230452

    Lots of information but a lot more history. Stories about Harry Pope and others.

    Many old and forgotten cartridges and equipment too!!

    It is offered on Cornell Publications as well.





    Scott
    Which one of those two guys in the photo is Sharpe?

  16. #56
    Boolit Grand Master uscra112's Avatar
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    The guy on the right. The guy on the left is the legendary Harry Pope.
    Cognitive Dissident

  17. #57
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    I got my perfect condition copy off ebay about ten years ago; $12 IIRC. Love reading it but it's virtually useless in the practical sense. Nothing of the old tools remain, most of the old powders and primers are gone or obsolete, our factory bullets are much better, etc., but the reloading history it recalls is priceless.

  18. #58
    Boolit Master WRideout's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shawlerbrook View Post
    Many leaders in different fields are self centered egomaniacs. Itís like the chicken and egg....are they egotistical because they are sages or did the ego help make them leaders. PO Ackley was known as an extreme self promoter. Thomas Edison was the same way. I think we should admire these peopleís work, not the people themselves. As an aside, one should always take historical reloading data with caution.
    You can include Frank Lloyd Wright in that list.

    Wayne
    What doesn't kill you makes you stronger - or else it gives you a bad rash.
    Venison is free-range, organic, non-GMO and gluten-free

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Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check