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Thread: Post forum cookbook recipes here, or links to ones that have been posted before

  1. #41
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  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lloyd Smale View Post
    mary are you looking for just cooking recipes or do you want recipes for making sausage, canning meat ect?
    Anything food related! Many of us can/make sausage!

  3. #43
    Boolit Grand Master Outpost75's Avatar
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    Links with WW2-era wartime rationing recipes:

    http://www.intheirwords.org/the_home...ioning/recipes

    https://1940sexperiment.wordpress.co...rtime-recipes/

    http://www.recipespastandpresent.org.uk/wartime/

    https://www.pinterest.com/mamanikkiw...s-ration-food/

    And no WW2 recipe collection is complete without "SOS"

    https://www.navyhistory.org/2016/04/...n-toast-s-o-s/

    http://www.leatherneck.com/forums/sh...cipe-for-S-O-S

    Leatherneck's World-Famous SOS Recipe
    1 1/2 pounds extra lean hamburger or ground chuck
    2 tbsp. oleo or butter
    1 cup chopped onion
    3 tbsp. flour
    2 tsp. granulated garlic
    2 tbsp. soy sauce (or less to taste)
    1 tbsp. Worcestershire sauce
    2 cups milk
    salt and pepper to taste
    sliced bread
    Brown the meat, then drain.
    Add oleo. Stir in the onions and cook until you can see through them.
    Add flour, stir and cook two to three minutes. Add garlic, soy sauce, Worcestershire sauce and mix thoroughly. Add milk and stir until it
    thickens. Serve over bread.

    Camp Lejeune's SOS Recipe for Manly Men
    1 lb. lean hamburger
    3 tsp. beef stock powder
    3 tbsp. plain flour
    ¼ tsp. salt
    ¼ tsp. black pepper
    ½ tbsp. Worcestershire sauce
    1 pint whole milk
    Brown hamburger. Add beef stock powder, flour, salt, pepper and then cook.
    Add Worcestershire sauce.
    Add milk and stir over low heat until thickened.
    Serve on burnt toast.

    And the official US Army recipe No. A-34 Creamed Ground Beef on Toast.

    100 servings of 1 cup each. Preparation and cooking time: about 1 1/4 hours

    35 pounds of Beef Carcass, cut into pieces and ground finely OR 24 pounds of finely ground boneless beef

    Brown beef in its own fat in roasting pans on top of range. Remove excess fat during cooking period.

    1 pound (3/4 quart) dried chopped onion
    5 oz (1/2 cup) salt
    1 oz (1 tablespoon) black pepper
    1 bay leaf

    Add onions and seasoning and mix thoroughly.

    2 gallons evaporated milk
    2 gallons of water for milk

    Add 3 gallons of milk to beef mixture and heat to simmering, stirring frequently.

    2 pounds (1 3/4 quarts) hard wheat flour.

    Mix flour with the remaining gallon of milk and stir into hot mixture. Bring to a boil, stirring steadily, reduce heat and simmer until thickened.

    100 slices toast.

    Serve on toast.
    Last edited by Outpost75; 05-24-2020 at 12:55 PM.
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  4. #44
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    Quick Shrimp Chowder
    Easy to make , this recipe makes a lot ...enough to feed 6-8 people , I cut this recipe in half for the wife and I and we have it for two nights .
    It freezes well , if you make the whole recipe and have a lot of leftovers don't panic ...freeze them .

    2 - Tab. butter
    1 - medium onion , chopped
    1 - bell pepper , chopped
    1 - rib of celery , chopped
    2 - cloves garlic , chopped
    1 - 10 oz. can diced Rotel Tomatoes
    2 - 10 oz. cans Campbell's Cream of Potato Soup
    2 - 15 oz. cans Cream Style Corn
    2 - 15 oz. cans whole Kernel Corn
    1 1/2 cups - Whole Milk or Half and Half
    2 lbs. - cleaned frozen raw shrimp tails
    3 Tab. - chopped green onion or chives
    Salt and pepper to taste

    1.) In a large , heavy pot , heat the butter and saute the onions , bell pepper, celery & garlic untill clear and tender .
    2.) Add tomatoes , potato soup , cream style corn , whole kernel corn (w/liquid) and milk or half & half .
    3.) Simmer over low heat until hot & thickened slightly , about 10 minutes . Check seasonings and adjust to taste . Note - the shrimp will "throw off" water so have the base on the thick side
    4) Increase the heat to medium . Add thawed raw shrimp , cover and cook until shrimp are done , about 15 - 20 minutes . Don't over cook the shrimp .
    5.) Let chowder stand for 10 minutes , serve in bowls & garnish with chopped green onion.
    A green salad and hot french bread completes the meal .

    Gary
    Certified Cajun
    Proud Member of The Basket of Deplorables
    " Let's Go Brandon !"

  5. #45
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    Per MaryB's request a recipe sticky has been added. The rules are, only copies of recipes, no discussion and no copyrighted items per her request. Discussion and comments go here. Mary will be letting staff know if a post needs moderating in the sticky. Thank you for sharing in advance.
    Steve,

    Life Member NRA
    Colorado Rifle Club member
    Rocky Mtn Gun Owners member
    NAGR member

  6. #46
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    Dads famous chicken!

    Dads famous chicken recipe.
    First and foremost!!! Turn oven on to 500 (yes 500) degrees. Let oven heat ALL the way to 500.
    In the meantime, take one whole chicken (minus the neck and innards- do what ya want with those) wash and pat dry inside and out.
    Take a large handful of sea salt or kosher salt and rub on the inside (big hand full).
    Take another big hand full and rub on the outside of the bird. Makes a light crust of salt.
    Place chicken in baking dish (like casserole pan-with sides because it makes a lot of juice).
    Okay second most important step, turn oven down to 400 degrees and place bird in oven.
    Cook 15 minutes per pound or minimum of an hour.

    That’s it! Just wear glasses when you cut into it because it will squirt on you!

    The process of the oven dropping from 500 to 400 will sear the bird and seal in all flavors and most juices.

    I promise this will be the best tasting chicken you can make. It’s cheap and really easy!

    You can freeze the carcass until you have two or three and then boil them to make chicken and dumpling broth!

    My kids named this, it’s their favorite.

    Tazlaw
    Just knowing enough to do it, is not enough to do it right! -Taz

  7. #47
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    From trebor44, thanks!

    Pork and beans with tomato

    As a kid I loved "Beans and Wieners", a can of Baked Beans and some wieners cooked together or the hot beans spooned over the cooked wieners. Fast forward a couple of decades (more like six) and the Gout Monster has moved into my house. So I had to modify my wants as follows:
    Note: you can use 'brand' names if you want, but I like cheap.

    My ingredients;

    1 can of Winco Great Northern beans, pour off about a half cup of the juice to make a rue of sorts.
    1 can of Winco Diced Tomato - low salt
    1 pound of diced Pork Loin - smaller pieces cook faster
    2 tablespoons of Olive Oil - your choce, but I like the Extra Virgin
    1 tablespoon of Corn Starch
    1 teaspoon of Oregano
    1/2 teaspoon of dry mustard
    2 tablespoon of dark brown sugar

    Saute (Med high heat) up the pork loin in the olive oil to a light brown. Then pour the bean juice - corn starch mix and stir until it thickens (your call)

    Add the beans, tomato etc. and simmer on a lower heat until it is to your liking. I usually go about 10-15 minutes. Since it is kind of soupy, serve it with crackers or fresh baked bread.

  8. #48
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    Links to my recipes

    Hi all,
    Bummer than the sticky got deleted, but let's just fix it and drive on. Here are links to the two recipes I previously posted. Note, the word "spicy" here is relative...if you like good and spicy, these will be mild. If you're sensitive to any heat, these will be spicy. As with any recipe, you are always welcome to tweak and modify to suite your tastes.
    Ed

    Spicy Pickled Eggs

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Spicy Smoked Meatloaf

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  9. #49
    Boolit Grand Master Outpost75's Avatar
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    Real Italian dry sausage “salame crudo" is made with pork meat and fat, cut with a knife, not ground in a grinder. The preservative is a mix of saltpeter (potassium nitrate), pepper and other spices. Wine is usually added to the mix, which is carefully stuffed into natural casings , taking great care not to leave air pockets inside the salami, which is then hung in a cellar to dry.

    The location of the cellar and the climate of the place make half of the mystery of this art. What is called Genoa salami in America is locally known as Salame di Sant’Olcese, a suburb of Genoa up in the Hills ( where the wild boars roam). Its characteristic is a good quantity of garlic in the mix. The town of Varzi in the Hills south of the Po river is the home of the best salami of this region. All the pig goes went into salami, the hams included, as raw ham was not made there.

    Pre-refrigeration they used saltpeter and spices to preserve the meat. The real thing, made in the traditional method and kept in a cool cellar, should keep until the next year’s salami is ready to eat.

    If they age too much, they dry up, depending on their weight and diameter. A good five pound Varzi lasts longer than small cacciatorini. The soppressa of the republic of St Marcus have bigger diameter and keep their softness for longer time. In days gone by the pigs were slaughtered in after the new year in January, because the weather was cold.

    In the war of 1859 the army‘s meat followed the soldiers on the hoof, being butchered in the evening, boiled over night and eaten with broth and bread for breakfast.

    If you have a salami too old and hard, just leave it overnight wrapped up in Barbera red wine and it will be ready to eat the next day. Pasteurizing salami as you do in the US is thought amongst Italian rural people to be a wicked idea.

    A modern recipe: Cotechino – aka Hunter’s Sausage
    Meats Metric US


    Pork 900 g 1.98 lb.
    beef, lean 100 g 0.22 lb.

    Ingredients per 1000g (1 kg) of meat

    Salt 18 g 3 tsp.
    Cure #1 2.5 g ½ tsp.
    Pepper 2.0 g 1 tsp.
    Sugar 1.0 g 1/5 tsp.
    Garlic 3.5 g 1 clove
    Juniper 1.0 g ½ tsp.
    cold water 100 ml ⅜ cup

    Instructions

    1. Grind lean pork with ½” (13 mm) plate, fat pork with ¼” or ⅜” (8 mm) plate. Grind beef twice through ⅛” (2 - 3 mm) plate.

    2. Add 20-25% of cold water in relation to the weight of the beef (about 1½ tablespoon) into the ground beef and mix well with remaining ingredients (juniper, garlic and pepper). Mix all pork together until the meat becomes glutinous. Finally mix everything together adding remaining water.

    3. Stuff mixture into 32 mm hog casings and form 7 - 8” (18-20 cm) links.

    4. Hang sausages at room temperature for 2-3 hours.

    5. Sausage is hot smoked in a few distinct stages:
    o At about 122º F (50º C) for 80-90 min. You can keep on increasing the smoking temperature gradually up to 176º F (80º C).
    o At 176 - 194º F (80 - 90º C) for 25 min until the internal temperature of 154 - 158º F (68 - 70º C) is reached. The color of the sausage should be brown.

    Though the above listed cooking temperatures might seem to be high, the sausage will stay at them at few minutes only and the inside should only reach 154 - 158º F.
    In the past the following steps were added:

    o The sausage was air-cooled at room temperature to 86º F (30º C) inside temperature. It hung on smoke sticks in the room until the next day allowing more moisture to escape from inside.

    o The sausage was smoked again the next day with warm smoke, 86º F (30º C) from 3 - 12 hours until it developed the dark brown color.

    o The sausage was stored at 60º - 65º F (16º - 18º C), in a dark place for 6 - 8 days (until the sausage obtained 60 - 65 % of its initial weight).

    o The finished product was the dry sausage that did not have to be refrigerated.

    Instacure or Prague powder #1 contains 6.25% sodium nitrite and 93.75% salt

    Instacure or Prague powder #2 is about 6.25% sodium nitrite, 1% sodium nitrate and 92.75% salt

    These cures are used making bacon, ham or sausages, or air dried meats to:

    • Prevent the possibility of botulism in the meat
    • To aid in preservation slightly
    • To improve the flavor of the finished product
    • To render the finished cooked product pink in color (otherwise your bacon will be gray)

    Cure #1 is used for curing meat product that requires cooking, such as bacon, pancetta, hams that are not air dried, smoked, but not dried sausages etc. - 2 tsps of #1 cures 10 lbs of sausage or bacon.

    Cure #2 is used in air dried meat products that are not cooked, dried salamis, pepperonis, and air dried hams such as prosciutto. #2 cure contains sodium nitrate which breaks down slowly into sodium nitrite, and is used for meats requiring long curing times, i.e. dry sausages and prosciutto.

    Cures are dyed pink so that you won’t confuse them with table salt and use them in toxic quantities. The minimum lethal dose of sodium nitrite is 71mg per kg of body weight. Commercial curing salts are mixed in small quantities with salt, dissolved into water, returned into uniform crystal and dyed pink. Don’t be afraid to use curing salts, but respect their potency and keep them safe from those who don’t know how to use them. Be sure that sure you understand how much to use and double e check recipes by comparing information on nitrite quantities in similar ones, to verify.
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  10. #50
    Boolit Grand Master Outpost75's Avatar
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    My late mother would never serve watery store bought gravy. Once you learn how simple it is to make your own traditional sauce you’ll never go back.

    Hunting Camp Gravy "sugo al ragù di carne"

    Pour ½ cup of extra virgin olive oil onto the bottom of a 4-qt. kettle, warm to medium heat.

    Add 1 cup each of diced onion and green bell peppers, and four cloves of minced garlic and sauté until the onions are clear

    Add: one 28 oz. can of tomato puree, or if you like "chunky" sauce substitute diced tomatoes for the puree.

    one 8 oz. can tomato sauce,

    one 6 oz. can tomato paste and

    1 cup. dry red wine, Chianti, using the wine to rinse the cans to get all their goodness out

    Then add a bay leaf plus a teaspoon each of dry basil, oregano, (1 tsp. of garlic powder if you did not have the 4 cloves of fresh garlic) and crushed red pepper (Use ¼ cup each of diced fresh herbs instead of dry if you’ve got ‘em)

    ½ tsp anchovy paste (optional, but highly recommended – don’t tell anyone, our “secret”)

    For meat sauce add 1 lb. of fully cooked, crumbled, drained ground chuck or Italian sausage, or 16 oz. package of thawed, frozen meat balls (optional)

    Add 1 tsp sea salt (½ is OK if watching sodium intake, but don’t leave it out, it needs some)

    Simmer 30 minutes over medium heat, stirring occasionally

    Add ½ cup half & half (to reduce the acidity from all that tomato!)

    Add 4 oz. 1 can of mushrooms with their packing liquid and stir well

    Now start boiling your pasta water and keep the sauce warm until ready to serve.

    Makes two quarts of sauce. Poach eggs on the leftovers and serve on toast points for breakfast or use it all now to serve 2 pounds of pasta now to a camp of hungry hunters.
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  11. #51
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    From gwpercle http://castboolits.gunloads.com/show...36#post4914836


    Insane Chocolate Pie Recipe

    This has to be the best chocolate pie I have ever consumed .
    My daughter adapted a few and came up with this winner .

    Ingredients:
    2/3 cup white sugar
    1/3 cup cornstarch
    1/2 tsp. salt
    2 egg yolks
    3 cups milk
    2 tbsp. butter , softened
    1 tbsp. vanilla extract
    2 cups Semi-Sweet Chocolate Chips (optional - dark chocolate chips can be used)
    Ghirardelli Semi-Sweet chips were used in this one .
    1 - pre-baked pie crust , 9 inch deep dish , regular crust will be full .
    garnish with Reddi-Whip topping or sweetened whipped cream .

    Directions:
    1.) Combine sugar with cornstarch and salt in a sauce pan . Whisk egg yolks with milk .
    Slowly whisk the milk mixture into the sugar mixture . Set sauce pan over medium heat . Cook stirring constantly , until mixture comes to a boil. Continue to boil and stir for 1 minute or until thickened . Remove from heat , stir in butter and vanilla .

    2.) Add 2 cups of chocolate chips ( you can reserve a few for garnishing if you like) ;
    Stir/whisk until chips are melted and mixture is well combined.
    Pour chocolate mixture into the pre-baked and cooled pie crust. Press plastic wrap directly onto the surface of the chocolate filling.
    Cool to room temperature , Chill completely in the refrigerator.

    3.) When completely chilled , remove plastic wrap , smooth out top , garnish with a few chocolate chips and whipped cream .

    Use good quality chocolate chips and a good pie crust (Ghirardelli and Pillsbury in this instance) and you will have one of those Pies you dream about !
    Gary

  12. #52
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  13. #53
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    Venison Sauce Piquante

    4 lbs. cubed venison
    8 medium onions
    2 bunches green onions
    1 bell pepper
    1 cup sliced celery
    2 (8 oz.) cans tomato sauce
    1 (6 oz.) can tomato paste
    1 cup olive oil
    2 large cloves garlic
    2 Tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
    2 lemons (juiced)
    1 cup flour
    Cajun Seasoning Spice - your favorite .
    salt and pepper to taste .
    10 cups water or chicken broth
    1 can beefy mushroom soup

    Wash venison , season well with Cajun Spice , salt and pepper . Fry in bacon drippings and remove from pan . In pan make a roux with olive oil and flour...medium brown then add tomato paste and cook until darker brown . Have the onions , green onions , bell pepper and celery chopped ... when the roux and tomato paste reach dark brown add them to the roux and stir until soft .
    Add tomato sauce and water or broth, whole garlic cloves , Worcestershire sauce and lemon juice .
    Simmer on low , covered 2 to 4 hours until the meat is very tender .
    Taste and adjust seasonings . Serve over hot fluffy rice .
    Gary
    Certified Cajun
    Proud Member of The Basket of Deplorables
    " Let's Go Brandon !"

  14. #54
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    Don't know if these have been added. Made some with fresh blueberries this morning. Only change I make is to add a tsp of vanilla and use a #2 ice cream scoop to size them. This was originally posted by Reverend Al, may he rest in peace.

    http://castboolits.gunloads.com/show...a-House-scones

  15. #55
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    Thanks to DougGuy!


    Skillet-Roasted Lemon Chicken

    I had a craving for some creamy lemon chicken like the soul sistas used to serve at the gas station cafe by the paper mill where I used to work shutdowns in Franklin, VA. They cooked it up in a huge flat roasting pan and served leg quarters over rice with greens, tater salad and sweet cornbread. it was totally southern soul food, home style cooking if there ever was any.

    It's funny how little things like that stick with you and keep coming back, those were GOOD days, I was healthy, pay was very good, hours were long and work was dirty and dangerous. Lunch was something you busted tail to the parking lot and drove like a madman down to the gas station hoping nobody beat you to the last piece of that chicken...

    I never got the recipe for that chicken so I just winged it with this one and it is VERY tasty and very close, in fact it is a good bit more flavorful and lemony than the dish that inspired it.

    Skillet-Roasted Lemon Chicken

    Ingredients:

    1tsp thyme
    1tsp rosemary
    1tsp oregano
    1tsp basil
    1tsp ground fennel seeds
    1tbsp olive oil
    ½ large yellow onion sliced 1/4” thick
    1 lemon sliced 1/4 inch thick
    Juice of one lemon
    Zest of one half lemon
    4 garlic cloves, crushed and chopped
    6 chicken legs (or thighs)
    1/2 cup dry white wine
    1tbsp Better Than Bouillon Roasted Chicken flavor

    Directions:

    1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.
    2. Pour olive oil in No. 8 cast iron skillet (with lid), place lemon slices, onion slices, garlic, and half the herbs in skillet.
    3. Sprinkle remaining herbs on chicken legs (use as much herbs as you like) and lay on top of onions and lemon, salt and pepper to taste, cover skillet and bake in oven until chicken reaches at least 170F in the thick parts, about 45mins maybe more.
    4. Remove skillet from oven and remove chicken legs, set aside. Remove and discard lemon rinds. Place skillet over medium heat and de-glaze skillet with wine, add lemon juice and lemon zest, add bouillon, add 1 cup water, whisk together using Wondra Flour to thicken and make gravy.
    5. Place chicken legs in gravy, cover skillet and place back in oven for 20 to 30 mins while making rice and other sides. Serve lemon gravy over rice.

    Picture here in the thread http://castboolits.gunloads.com/show...-Lemon-Chicken

  16. #56
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    This one is courtesy of AGuyNamedMIke on the HiPoint forum, it intrigued me so I asked for the recipe. And I need to try it as a side dish!

    Fried corn bread

    My Gramma was a pistol of a woman born in North Carolina in 1925. She raised three daughters and kept Grandaddy on his toes, worked in the tobacco barns as a teen and 30 years in a cigarette factory as an adult and still cooked every day (She paid a woman named Clara to come in and clean a couple days a week. Clara was a pistol herself!). She passed away in 1993 from cancer, and left an indelible impression on all who knew her. I was fortunate enough to grow up in the same town as my grandparents and spent so much time with them I had my own bedroom in their house (it had been my mother's). This cornbread was served alongside supper more often than not and is the only kind I knew until I went away to college, where they tried to serve me some sweet, baked, cake-like monstrosity. It took me a few years to begin to enjoy the baked kind on it's own merits but my Gramma and her recipe will always be what I think of when someone says "cornbread".

    Gramma's Cornbread

    1 1/2 cups of plain corn meal (preferably from a North Carolina mill), unsifted
    1/4 cup of all purpose flour, sifted
    1 level teaspoon salt
    1 level teaspoon black pepper (or more)
    1/2 cup milk
    water

    Heat bacon grease or oil in the big skillet.
    Mix the ingredients in a bowl, adding some water until it's a little thin like pancake batter.
    When the oil is hot spoon in the batter, making cakes about 4 inches across.
    Fill the skillet, leaving enough room to turn the cakes.
    When the cakes start bubbling through and the edges start to brown flip them. Only flip once or you'll burn them.
    After a while they should be done on the other side so pull them out and put them on paper towels to drain and cool.

  17. #57
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    I Would describe these as corn Dodgers of True Grit fame.

    Fried corn bread cooked into 2" cakes would make an excellent trail snack. I made a batch today for breakfast without the pepper. Ok plain better with preserves jelly or honey. Next time I'll add an egg and 1 tsp of baking powder.

    Today I made a batch as described above. Cakes held together better and were lighter/fluffier. Shallow fried in bacon grease. Tasted great plain and with honey.
    Last edited by jdfoxinc; 09-06-2020 at 06:51 PM. Reason: Added comment
    QUIS CUSTODIET IPSOS CUSTODES?

  18. #58
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    PICKLED PEPPERS

    Clean and sterilize 2 pint jars with new lids and rings .
    Pack the jars with sliced peppers from your garden , hot or mild , jalapeno , gypsey or lunchbox red sweet snacking peppers ... whatever pepper you like and top with a few cloves of peeled garlic .

    Bring to a boil , 1 cup Vinegar , 1 cup of water , 1 Tablespoon Salt and 1 Tablespoon Sugar.
    Stir and bring to a gentle boil , pour over peppers packed into jars and fill to brim ...add a little hot water if needed , quickly cap jars and invert them on a towel to cool . Let them stand two weeks to pickle . Refrigerate after opening .
    Great on sandwiches , pizzas , salads ... anywhere you like !

    Gary
    Certified Cajun
    Proud Member of The Basket of Deplorables
    " Let's Go Brandon !"

  19. #59
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    From jonp


    Chicken/Rib Marinade

    I ran across this one after much searching online one afternoon looking for a Rib Marinade. I made a few changes that I'll put in after the original.

    1/4 C Olive Oil
    1/4 C Worcestershire Sauce
    1 1/4 C Soy Sauce
    2 TBS Balsamic vinegar
    1 TBS Dijon Mustard
    4 Cloves Garlic

    That's it. I didn't have Balsamic Vinegar or Dijon mustard so tried it with both white and cider vinegar and regular mustard, it seemed fine. I also added some sweetner to it. First time some maple syrup along with regular mustard, white vinegar on ribs and it was great. Second time for chicken I used molasses, cider vinegar and a little Old Bay Seasoning for spice. Also great. Leaving out the Old Bay and using either brown or horseradish mustard would be interesting. I also let it sit for a few hours turning occasionally. One other thing. I used garlic powder not the cloves and since I love garlic just dumped in what looked good to me.

    Both really made the meat tender. I suspect the vinegar helped break down the meat fibers while the olive oil moistened it up. Cooked over low-med on the grill and the ribs/chicken were very juicy.

    Great basic and easy marinade with stuff you have in the cupboard. Wife liked it enough that she wrote it down as " Jon's All Time Best Marinade"

    http://castboolits.gunloads.com/show...n-Rib-Marinade

  20. #60
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    Jun 2013
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    SW Minnesota
    Posts
    10,419
    From now on I am going to try and link to the original thread, that link will also go in the cookbook. Often has great pics and the discussion soften have extra hints, recipe changes etc people have tried.

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Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check