RepackboxWidenersLee PrecisionInline Fabrication
MidSouth Shooters Supply

Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Robert D Reeves

  1. #1
    Boolit Buddy
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    West central Illinois
    Posts
    338

    Robert D Reeves

    Has anyone heard of a muzzleloader built by Robert Reeves? I have a chance to buy one and it's gorgeous . It's numbered at 41 and I could google it and found # 49 and# 57. Apparantly built in the 70's. Plains rifle,curly maple stock 50 cal. Any info would be appreciated . Bill

  2. #2
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Chula Vista, CA
    Posts
    1,145
    As I see it, unless you are buying the rifle as an investment, the builder is immaterial. If the gun looks good, well made, no rust in the bore, etc, etc and you plan to shoot it, then buy it and enjoy it.

  3. #3
    Moderator Emeritus / Trusted loob groove dealer

    waksupi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Somers, Montana, a quaint little drinking village,with a severe hunting and fishing problem.
    Posts
    18,976
    Quote Originally Posted by oldracer View Post
    As I see it, unless you are buying the rifle as an investment, the builder is immaterial. If the gun looks good, well made, no rust in the bore, etc, etc and you plan to shoot it, then buy it and enjoy it.
    Agreed. Go by the condition. There are so many builders, that it will be a hundred years before anyone starts to gain recognition as a builder, unless they are a Hershal House, or Monte Mandarino.
    The solid soft lead bullet is undoubtably the best and most satisfactory expanding bullet that has ever been designed. It invariably mushrooms perfectly, and never breaks up. With the metal base that is essential for velocities of 2000 f.s. and upwards to protect the naked base, these metal-based soft lead bullets are splendid.
    John Taylor - "African Rifles and Cartridges"

    Forget everything you know about loading jacketed bullets. This is a whole new ball game!


  4. #4
    Boolit Buddy
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    West central Illinois
    Posts
    338
    I agree and I plan on buying it.its in excellent shape and beautiful. Couldn't ask for any more.

  5. #5
    Boolit Grand Master

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Bloomfield, Nebraska
    Posts
    6,048
    Don't just look at the outside, it's how it's built inside that counts. If you can take off the lock and see how it's inlet, is the stock waterproofed/finished inside and out or is the finish all on the surface. Do the holes line up right or are they hogged out on the inside. Quality lock? Quality triggers? QUALITY BARRELL? Way too many builders tend to buid for the eye rather than for the hand. I would rater take a plain gun built right into the woods that a fancy gun with sloppy internals, or cheap fixings.

    Case in point I had a fellow come in with an old CVA rifle and a fancy chunk of curly maple wood.... make me a rifle out of this. No way am I going to put my mark on a rifle with a bridleless CVA lock no matter how fancy the wood might be. If the gun meets the quality test buy it no matter who's name is on it.

  6. #6
    Boolit Buddy
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    West central Illinois
    Posts
    338
    Well said KCSO

  7. #7

    Robert Reeves Rifle

    I realize this is a very old post, but I thought I would add my two cents. Robert D. Reeves was a highly respected and skilled builder of muzzleloading rifles, particularly Hawken variations. I have #48 dated 1972. Reeves used only the best parts available - mine has a W.M. Large barrel and Bob Roller lock. I do hope the OP bought the rifle.Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20221110_064352.jpg 
Views:	31 
Size:	31.4 KB 
ID:	306699Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20221109_170856.jpg 
Views:	23 
Size:	24.6 KB 
ID:	306700Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20221109_170945.jpg 
Views:	25 
Size:	41.2 KB 
ID:	306701Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20221110_065055.jpg 
Views:	21 
Size:	56.4 KB 
ID:	306702

  8. #8
    Boolit Buddy Gtrubicon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Northern ca
    Posts
    409
    Quote Originally Posted by bigskybound View Post
    I realize this is a very old post, but I thought I would add my two cents. Robert D. Reeves was a highly respected and skilled builder of muzzleloading rifles, particularly Hawken variations. I have #48 dated 1972. Reeves used only the best parts available - mine has a W.M. Large barrel and Bob Roller lock. I do hope the OP bought the rifle.Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20221110_064352.jpg 
Views:	31 
Size:	31.4 KB 
ID:	306699Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20221109_170856.jpg 
Views:	23 
Size:	24.6 KB 
ID:	306700Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20221109_170945.jpg 
Views:	25 
Size:	41.2 KB 
ID:	306701Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20221110_065055.jpg 
Views:	21 
Size:	56.4 KB 
ID:	306702
    Beautiful rifle!

  9. #9
    Boolit Buddy

    Tom Trevor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    105
    Lived in Lancaster California.

  10. #10
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    3,067
    Quote Originally Posted by KCSO View Post
    Don't just look at the outside, it's how it's built inside that counts. If you can take off the lock and see how it's inlet, is the stock waterproofed/finished inside and out or is the finish all on the surface. Do the holes line up right or are they hogged out on the inside. Quality lock? Quality triggers? QUALITY BARRELL? Way too many builders tend to buid for the eye rather than for the hand. I would rater take a plain gun built right into the woods that a fancy gun with sloppy internals, or cheap fixings.

    Case in point I had a fellow come in with an old CVA rifle and a fancy chunk of curly maple wood.... make me a rifle out of this. No way am I going to put my mark on a rifle with a bridleless CVA lock no matter how fancy the wood might be. If the gun meets the quality test buy it no matter who's name is on it.
    FWIW
    you both right, the CVA barrel (provided its not shot out or rusted) is as good as any you can get

    a bridle less lock (regardless the maker) is crap ---just a poor design engineering wise.

    most of the CVA's I have seen had bridle locks and worked fine - some of em had a long nose sear that was a problem (I posted a fix for that ages ago somewhere in the ML forum - once its done they are fail safe.)

    put my first CVA together in 1988 - still shooting them today. Not as glamorus as the pricey stuff but they get it done just as good

    In the middle of a build now ..... CVA kentucky .45 barrel, purty curly maple stock, davis single set trigger, L & R Late English Flintlock - gonna be a sweet little flinter and I know it will shoot.


    edit -- its raining - miserable out - I must be bored -didnt look at the dates here!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check