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Thread: T/C frizzen

  1. #1
    Boolit Man
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    T/C frizzen

    I bought a new frizzen for my T/C Renegade from DGW, and had a couple questions. The one that came on the rifle is color case hardened, this one is a matte blue. Do I have the right part? Also I figured someone here must have replaced one before, so I could get some instruction on how to do it and any tips to make it easy. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
    "Feel the heart of the hunter - feel the thrill that will cleanse the soul."

  2. #2
    Boolit Master

    curator's Avatar
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    Compress the frizzen spring before removing the pivot screw. Pull screw, replace frizzen, replace screw. I like to treat the pivot screw's threads with anti-size compound when I replace it. I have seen too many of these rusted in due to their proximity to powder fouling. BTW, T/C would have probably done this for free if you had sent it to them. They have great service and a life-time warantee that extends past original owners. Don't use those danged "cut" agate flints and you may never have to replace the frizzen again.

  3. #3
    Boolit Master

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    Old TC frizzens were case hardened, the new and better frizzens are not. TC may or may not have replaced this under warranty. I sent a lock in with the old style hammer and frizzen specifically to have them replaced and they replaced only small parts. I guess it's up to the tech that works on it.

    I use a small pair of vise grip pliers to compress and hold the frizzen spring. Don't crush it, just put enough pressure on it to free up the frizzen.
    Most people would sooner die than think, in fact, they do so. -B. Russell

  4. #4
    Boolit Master
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    Best frizzen to use is a Lyman frizzen I have a few lyman on 2 locks that has seen well over 1,000 round threw it and still spark excellent.
    The lyman frizzen needs some filing not a hard task to fit t/c locks

  5. #5
    Boolit Master

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    I assume the new frizzen is specifically for the TC? Shouldn't take much compression on the frizzen spring to allow alignment of the screw. Small set of vice grips with jaws gently squeezing on the spring as far away from the hairpin as possible. Don't know about that particular Dixie frizzen though. If the frizzen face is soft you'll have to harden it. To test, take a file or sandpaper and rub across frizzen. You can "feel" if it is hardened or not. Something like Kasenit or even fine bone powder along with a propane torch can be used to case harden the face. Then it's just a matter of checking the geometry between the cock and the frizzen and fit between the frizzen and pan. Also check how much tension there is between the frizzen and the frizzen spring as it cams over... it shouldn't take much force to roll frizzen over.

  6. #6
    Boolit Man
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    On Dixie's website it says that the frizzen is a T/C part. Thanks all for the help.
    "Feel the heart of the hunter - feel the thrill that will cleanse the soul."

  7. #7
    Boolit Master

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    Quote Originally Posted by daddywpb View Post
    On Dixie's website it says that the frizzen is a T/C part. Thanks all for the help.
    That's good. It should be close to correct dimensions. Still would be good idea to check the frizzen face for hardness and case harden if needed. Also, wouldn't hurt to check the tension on the frizzen. You can hone down the spur (keeping the same radius) that rides the frizzen spring (only if needed) to reduce the frizzen tension if it is too great and if nothing else, polish it for smoother travel. If unsure about how much tension is needed then fire it a few times and see how the flint sparks and how good the ignition is. A lot of things happen when the cock falls. If it eats flints quickly or if ignition is poor then start trying to identify problems one item at a time. Frizzen shape and angle of attack between flint and frizzen are two to consider. Then the flint edge angle and where the flint first contacts the frizzen face. The frizzen spring tension is another and so on. Good luck!

  8. #8
    Boolit Master northmn's Avatar
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    All ahve told you how to install, whcih I cannot add to. But I do owe Jim Chambers, Bud Siler and their ancestors a silent apology when I started to tune a Siler lock and found after a little filing that lubing the contact between the spring and frizzen can do wonders. Keep taht area lubed. Also be caeful if you rmove metal as a good frizzen spring hold the frizzen open and does no permit rebound which can be ahrd on flints.

    Northmn

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BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
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HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
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