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Thread: Revolver forcing cone angle/reamer

  1. #1
    Boolit Master
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    Revolver forcing cone angle/reamer

    I have heard of pistolsmiths changing the angle of a revolvers forcing cone (I think thats what you call the end of the barrel where boolit enters) for improved accuracy. I was wondering if anyone has tried this and was looking at Brownells but could not find a tool for a do it yourselfer. They do have cylinder chamber reamers and muzzle crown cutters. Maybe I did not look hard enough.
    Anyway does anyone think this a benefit? Is a certain angle better than another. I shoot some pretty old revolvers and was thinking they might benefit from at least a "cleaning up" in this area. What ya think???

  2. #2
    Boolit Master Scrounger's Avatar
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    Looks to me like the barrel would have to be removed to work on the forcing cone. That would take it out of the evil clutches of most of us bubbas...

    Shows how much I know...Wrong again.
    Last edited by Scrounger; 01-30-2009 at 09:22 PM.

  3. #3
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    Bret4207's Avatar
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    Brownells sells a kit for just that. I'll see if I can locate it for you.

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    Bret4207's Avatar
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    Here ya go- http://www.brownells.com/aspx/ns/sto...?c=1306&p=4810 That's the critter IIRC.

  5. #5
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    I have an interest in this area too, any of you guys have any experiance in this area?
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  6. #6
    Boolit Man
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    I have done it many times BUT do not ream the forcing cone if if passes the no go gage. Then yo need to set the barrel back.

  7. #7
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    lathesmith's Avatar
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    The forcing cone seems to be one of those neglected areas in revolver manufacture. I have polished more than a few of mine--I've had several guns of various makes that had SERIOUS burrs and ridges that shaved lead and definitely had improved performance with a good polishing. As JMax implies though, it is easy to over-do it, you don't usually have to remove much metal to clean things up.
    lathesmith

  8. #8
    anachronism
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    I do mine where needed. You do need to use the plug gauges to make certain you don't screw everything up. Early Redhawks had especially poor forcing cones, one of mine looked like it had been cut with a rat-tailed file. You"ll want to check your original forcing cone to make sure it can be recut to the angle you want. Different manufacturers use different angles.

  9. #9
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    Larry Gibson's Avatar
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    I also have the Brownell's kit and have reamed numerous forcing cones on revolvers. As lathesmith mentions many just need a good polishing.

    Larry Gibson

  10. #10
    Boolit Master SCIBUL's Avatar
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    + 1 ! The only revolvers that didn't need it were my RUGER Blackhawk .357 and my S&W 629 DX.

  11. #11
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    garandsrus's Avatar
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    I think that the forcing cone is reamed as a pull through reamer, so the barrel doesn't need to be removed.

    John

  12. #12
    Boolit Master Ghugly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by garandsrus View Post
    I think that the forcing cone is reamed as a pull through reamer, so the barrel doesn't need to be removed.

    John
    Yep. I have the Brownells kit. My .44 Bulldog spit lead do to an almost non-existant forcing cone. 5 minutes with the reamer and no more lead spitting. Quick, easy, and does what it's ment to do. I can see, however, that it would be easy to over do.

  13. #13
    Boolit Master
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    Thanks guys I did find the kit after looking through my Brownells more thouroughly. Please tell me how to guage when to stop. I am not sure how to check.

  14. #14
    Boolit Mold
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    You need to get the forcing cone guage for the specific caliber of interest to go with the reamer.

  15. #15
    Boolit Master leftiye's Avatar
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    Side note, and if a Ruger rep is reading here I guess he'll just have to endure the bad press. I have a friend (Boom Boom) who just slobbers whenever he gets a new Ruger. He's brought a couple by to have chamber mouths, cylinder gap, and forcing cone checked out. How does .030" sound for a cylinder gap? What do you think of off center forcing cones? Or forcing cones that ahve a depth of 3/8" before the rifling starts (or both)? Everyone knows about how many Rugers have smaller chamber mouths than groove diameters. All of their strength, and design count for nothing to me if they're gonna have H&R quality control.
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    Bret4207's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by leftiye View Post
    Side note, and if a Ruger rep is reading here I guess he'll just have to endure the bad press. I have a friend (Boom Boom) who just slobbers whenever he gets a new Ruger. He's brought a couple by to have chamber mouths, cylinder gap, and forcing cone checked out. How does .030" sound for a cylinder gap? What do you think of off center forcing cones? Or forcing cones that ahve a depth of 3/8" before the rifling starts (or both)? Everyone knows about how many Rugers have smaller chamber mouths than groove diameters. All of their strength, and design count for nothing to me if they're gonna have H&R quality control.
    That's a factory "Taylor Throat"!!!

  17. #17
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    HeavyMetal's Avatar
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    The only time I've "cut" a forcing cone was after I set back a barrel. Because I shoot a lot of lead I kinda favor the 11 degree set up. Trying to re-cut a factory forcing cone, especially if you want to change the angle, is a bad idea. Basically to many compound angles and you'll only make things worse IMHO.

    Polishing, while staying within the factory cone angle, is a different story. Find out which angle is used on the specific gun your trying to polish, Brownell's has them listed in the catalog, and use the finest grit compound you can find and a real light touch because this can be overdone as well!

  18. #18
    Boolit Master
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    Yeah I guess I'm more interested in "polishing" them then changing the angle. It looks like Brownells sells a "soft brass" cone shaped gizmo that you can imbed some polishing compound into it for polishing.

  19. #19
    Boolit Master S.R.Custom's Avatar
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    Polishing an existing forcing cone is a good thing, but if you have to re-cut it or modify it in such a manner as to correct spitting or accuracy problems, you have a chamber/bore misalignment or a timing problem that needs fixed.
    “If your only tool is a hammer, then all your problems start to look like people who need to be beaten with a hammer.”

  20. #20
    Boolit Master McLintock's Avatar
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    Just be sure to note that they have cutters with different angles, so be sure you're matching the right angle to the gun you're doing. Seems like Smith's like a 5 degree and Colts and Ruger single actions are usually done to a 11 degree.
    McLintock

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