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Thread: Difficult Barrel Removal on Mauser

  1. #61
    Boolit Master

    MtGun44's Avatar
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    Next try Auto Tranny Fluid (ATF) & acetone mix, out penetrates everything in testing, lower removal torque of
    any penetrating oil tested.

    Bill
    If it was easy, anybody could do it.

  2. #62
    Boolit Master

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    Quote Originally Posted by KCSO View Post
    No, No NOT a pipe wrench!!! Use a real barrel vise, they are not that spendy.
    Well, he already said he drilled a hole throught the barrel. Don't see as it matters much now if the outside gets messed up.....

  3. #63
    Boolit Master
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    * Clamp the barrel in a barrel vice
    * Where the barrel joins the receiver, make a wick wrapping cotton string around the barrel
    * Make a mixture of 50:50 - acetone: ATF or Marvel's Mystery Oil - shake well. The mixture only needs 68 ft lbs to break a rusted bolt loose - measured with a torque wrench
    * Soak the string with the mixture and keep it wet for a day or so ... the mix will creep into the threads
    * Lock your padded wrench on the receiver and see if it breaks loose
    * If it doesn't, fill a 5 gallon pail with metal or lead
    * Tie the the pail to the receiver and let it hang down so there is pressure exerted.
    * Again keeping the string wet
    I've remove several old single shot barrels using this method with success
    Regards
    John

  4. #64
    Boolit Master nanuk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MtGun44 View Post
    Next try Auto Tranny Fluid (ATF) & acetone mix, out penetrates everything in testing, lower removal torque of
    any penetrating oil tested.

    Bill
    ATF has similar characteristics as Diesel albeit a little thicker

    I'll have to try this, as it should stink less
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  5. #65
    Boolit Master

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    Actually, ATF has very little in common with diesel fuel. ATF has a lot of special
    properties, corrosion protection, extreme pressure lubrication, anti-foaming, detergents
    to keep dirt and wear particles in suspension, etc.. Diesel is primarily blended to have
    high energy and an adequate cetane rating so that it will ignite well under pressure.

    Bill
    If it was easy, anybody could do it.

  6. #66
    Boolit Master nanuk's Avatar
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    Bill, by similar, I mean it will run an engine, clean out rust, lubricate without attracting to much dust
    and they both work well as carb cleaner additive in a gas engine. I think both have detergents added.


    I think the differences are what is added after cracking... I wonder how far apart they are on the scale of oils?
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  7. #67
    Boolit Master

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    Run an engine on ATF? I suppose . . . . . but I don't think for long.

    IMO one is a fuel - much looser limits, ATF is a lubricant, coolant, anticorrosion and
    shear stable hydraulic fluid that has to be heat stable for a decade or more under high
    loads, etc. Don't think diesel is much controlled except overall cetane rating and minimal
    lubricity for the injectors and/or pump. Maybe I'm off on this.

    My view is ATF is "fancy stuff, high tech, long lasting" and diesel fuel is "dumb old fuel,
    used up in a minute" - maybe I underestimate diesel.

    Bill
    If it was easy, anybody could do it.

  8. #68
    Boolit Master nanuk's Avatar
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    Bill, I don't mean they are the same stuff, or even nearly so

    what I mean is that one can sub for another in certain circumstances.

    around here, Diesel is a common rust breaker, as it is cheap and everyone has some. I dunno about yours, but ours is clean with detergents. it makes a great carb cleaner on gas engines.
    Pour it on a sickle mower knife at the start of the year... cleans up the rust and doesn't attract dirt.


    for penetrant, Diesel and acetone is good. I have also heard of ATF/acetone/kerosene for penetrant.

    similar characteristics to mean is like comparing mineral spirits to Methyl... both are good degreasers. both will kill you if you drink too much of them. both work in a pinch in a zippo


    now that I am interested, I will see if our local fuel expert can tell me how close they are on the oil tree.

    ADDED: as for fuel, on the alternative fuel sites, there is often mention of running the older style diesel engines on straight ATF, or a blend. Same as with Veggie oil.
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  9. #69
    Boolit Master

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    As long as it works for your application . . . . then it is perfect.


    Bill
    If it was easy, anybody could do it.

  10. #70
    Boolit Man

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    Couple o' things here and I'd like member input: First, I have a K98 barrel removal and replacement project at hand. I've never done this before. I do have a barrel vice, but no action wrench. I also have a 10"x36" Atlas lathe if it comes down to it. But I also have a large, bench-mounted pipe vise and that's what has my mental gears turning (clang, clang...gnash, strip). No, I don't intend to stick my bare action in the pipe vise, but I think I may have come up with a way to use it. Ya'll bear with me and let me know if you think this'll work. I've got an idea for a universal action-holding fixture that should work with any action:

    First, I'll get a piece of 3 or 4 inch square steel box beam around 8 to 12 inches long. Then I'll weld a square bottom onto it so that I've basically got a small square bucket that an action will fit in. There are a variety of low temperature alloys, such as Cerrosafe, that melt at around the boiling point of water. I happen to have several pounds of this alloy. I'm thinking I can put my K98 action in the little bucket and fill it to barrel level with the (melted) low temp alloy. When it cools and solidifies I can chuck it in the large pipe vise and then remove the barrel. The now-solid alloy should provide support over the entire action instead of just a few points and offer no chance for warping or crushing. Additionally, this approach would work with any action in the future. To remove the action, you would just gently heat the little bucket to a couple of hundred degrees fahrenheit. This should be well below the temperature required to cause any harm to the metal.

    Do you guys see any reason why this wouldn't work, or see any downside risk to it?

    OK. Next question: I'm replacing a bad, stock K98 barrel with a good used example. What do I do if the sights on the new barrel don't line up correctly with the action? Do I just heat the sights so the solder melts, loosen the screws and turn them or what?

    Thanks for any input.

    Best regards
    Doc

  11. #71
    Boolit Master

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    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Gibson View Post
    The big pie wrench works quite well as does a large vise with teeth. Best is to chuck it up in a lathe and turn the shoulder off (or make s stright in cut) where it butts aganst the reciever. This relieves the pressure and the barrel will turn right off.
    Yep. If I have a junk barrel on a mauser, an action wrench and an 18" pipe wrench comes out. It has never failed. Ruins the barrel though. Also, I have used epoxy on the wooden blocks and then tighten up. Wait overnight. This will sometimes do the trick. Wood can be shattered off the barrel, wood shards and epoxy can be cleaned up with a wire wheel.

  12. #72
    Boolit Master





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    When I installed a new 8mm Mauser barrel on a Yugo 24/47 model a few years back I removed the rear sights base screw and then heated the base of the rear and front sights with a propane torch until the Silver Solder started loosing its grip. At that point I used a 5lb lead hammer to tap the sights level and parallel with each other.

    Once I removed the heat it started cooling and set it into itself.

    Bruce
    Last edited by bruce drake; 09-15-2017 at 10:20 AM.
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  13. #73
    Boolit Man
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    I have been doing this awhile myself. Even though a large ring Mauser seats up against an internal ring there is often a secondary seal that takes place up against the front of the receiver. In these instances cutting a relief up to the front receiver can allow penetrating oil to get into the threads and help break up a corrosion bond.
    I am referring to those of us that are fortunite enough to have a lath to work with. After the barrel is removed I would always put a tight fitting mandrel up though the action,set the mandrel/action between centers and true the front of the receiver to the bore of the action.When you get to fitting a new barrel---measure to the inner receiver ring and finish the barrel with an extra 1.5 th.to the new barrel shoulder. The barrel will touch up on the inner ring and then when it is torqued to a final fit it will also align up and finish its fitting to the front action face on the receiver. This gives good straight allignment.
    For reluctant barrels of all types I like to squirt Kroil into the receiver up against the shank of the barrel. I then let it soak for a couple of hours. I then apply heat to the outside of the receiver sufficient to start to make the Kroil start to bubble on the inside of the action/receiver barrel joint.I then let it cool down some and usually it is ready for an easy or at least standard removal. Another trick that can help some times. ( I use wooded blocks in my barrel vice. Held in a hydralic press) If the rosen is still slipping and I am not concerned about the barrel I will put pieces of metal sanding screening such as is used on sanding pads for sanding drywall and clamp down. This abrasive surface will often provide enough grip and not slip on the barrel.

  14. #74
    Boolit Master





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    thanks for the idea regarding the metal mesh. I'll try that on an Enfield #4 I'm currently dealing with regarding removing its barrel and replacing it with a 303 Pygmy barrel from New Zealand.
    I Cast my Boolits, Therefore I am Happy.
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  15. #75
    Boolit Bub
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    This is an old thread, I thought I'd add a bit to it. I have a Yugo 24/47 project in progress. In removing the barrel I found out a few things. When a barrel has been in one spot for 50+ years, it wants to stay there. More importantly, the proofing load used to proof the barreled actions were so strong they often ovaled the barrel threads in the receiver. My barrel removal process was:

    - cut the barrel off 2 inches or so in front of the receiver
    - indicate the receiver in a 4-jaw chuck on a lathe, bore the chamber out, leaving enough metal to prevent the threads from breaking off in the receiver
    - put a pipe wrench on the barrel stub and wedge against the lathe bed, use an adjustable wrench to turn the lathe chuck to turn the barrel stub out of the receiver

    This worked well and there was minimal damage to the threads in the receiver.

  16. #76
    Boolit Mold
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    I have used an angle grinder to grind flats on opposing sides of the barrel on the thickest part of the barrel in front of the receiver. The flats provide a mechanical shoulder for the vise and the grinding heats the junction between barrel and action. No rosin required and no barrel blocks are needed. It has worked on several bad barrels.

  17. #77
    Boolit Master Clark's Avatar
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    I have pulled the barrel on over 100 rifles, mostly military. The combination of 500 foot pounds of torque, Kroil, and a sledge hammer always gets the flat bottomed receivers.

    But the round Rem 700 receivers when gripped with something like a barrels vise [in addition to the barrel vise on the barrel] can cause the receiver to clamp down on the barrel threads. This and the glue that the Remington factory puts on the threads can make it hard.


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