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Thread: Help me decide which caliber to barrel a #5 Rolling block actionin, 1901 model.

  1. #21
    Boolit Master marlinman93's Avatar
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    I have a Husqvarna Type 33A in their version of the .38-55 which is a 9.5x47R and I use .38-55 brass slightly shortened. But I still plan on building up a .38-55 on a full sized #1 action I have here. I want it to be built like Remington's #1 Sporting Schuetzen rifles were. Always wanted a Rolling Block Schuetzen rifle, and I like the .38-55 too.

  2. #22
    Boolit Master
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    John Taylor you have a pm.

  3. #23
    Boolit Master Shawlerbrook's Avatar
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    No wrong choice here, but the 7x57 would be my first choice followed by a 30 30.

  4. #24
    Boolit Man
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    Quote Originally Posted by sharps4590 View Post
    If loaded to normal pressures, ain't that a bit much for a rolling block?
    If loaded to normal pressure (49,000 CIP piezo, 44,000 cip crusher) the 9.3X74Rmm is well under the 7X57 at 57,000/49,000. It's pressure rated the same as the 7X57R.
    Bill

  5. #25
    Boolit Master


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    I have a mechanically solid #5 in the original 7mm. Bore is cruddy. My plan has been to rebarrel to 30-40, which has a nice long neck and offers a bit more performance than does the 30-30, while still being 'age appropriate.'

  6. #26
    Boolit Master marlinman93's Avatar
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    I often read people's comments about the smokeless Rolling Blocks, and the calibers they were offered in, and justifying how hot they can load their Rolling Blocks based on this data. I personally think the old Rolling Blocks in any year action are not a very strong design. I do love them, and they're my first choice when contemplating a new gun build from a single shot action. But regardless of whether it's a BP or smokeless action, I wont chamber, or load mine beyond loads of about 25,000 psi max. That's good for a BP action, and although a smokeless can take more, it's just not a strong action design, whether it was offered in high pressure originally or not.
    Just my opinion, and the way I treat mine.

  7. #27
    Boolit Master

    TCLouis's Avatar
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    30-30 without a doubt!
    Nothing is impossible for the person that does not have to do it.

  8. #28
    Boolit Master marlinman93's Avatar
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    .30-30 is a 42,000 psi pressure range, and I wouldn't do it. Not that the owner would overload it, but down the road who knows what might be chambered and shot.

  9. #29
    Boolit Master

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    Depending on what extended ranges you shoot at, how much you practice, and how big a critter you'll go after,
    the .30-30 has great appeal.
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  10. #30
    Boolit Grand Master



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    Quote Originally Posted by marlinman93 View Post
    I often read people's comments about the smokeless Rolling Blocks, and the calibers they were offered in, and justifying how hot they can load their Rolling Blocks based on this data. I personally think the old Rolling Blocks in any year action are not a very strong design. I do love them, and they're my first choice when contemplating a new gun build from a single shot action. But regardless of whether it's a BP or smokeless action, I wont chamber, or load mine beyond loads of about 25,000 psi max. That's good for a BP action, and although a smokeless can take more, it's just not a strong action design, whether it was offered in high pressure originally or not.
    Just my opinion, and the way I treat mine.
    Interesting information and actual testing here
    http://castboolits.gunloads.com/show...pdoor-Strength

    It mostly deals with Trapdoor Springfield's but it does have some on Rollers. The surprise is the TD were more robust than thought and the Rollers less so. Your advice is excellent on the max chamber pressures. The other area some overlook is some of the Rollers have really large firing pin holes that should be bushed.
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  11. #31
    Boolit Master

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    I have seen many rollers where the breach face is no square to the bore. This does not seem to have a problem with black powder cartridges but when you get into some of the higher pressure rounds it can distort the base of the brass. When the #5 came out the 7X57 was very popular and was used in many countries in the roller. Around 1913 the cartridge was changed to a lighter bullet at higher velocity. I do not have any info about the pressure, if it was changed. I have heard a few say there is a problem using modern 7X57 in their old roller, seems if you pull a fired case out it will not fit back in the chamber. I do not have a personal experience with this problem.

  12. #32
    Boolit Master marlinman93's Avatar
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    I've experienced the same thing John, and some bad enough that after firing the empty case could be extracted, but would not rechamber unless it was indexed exactly the same as before. The block not being perpendicular to the chamber caused bent rims, and those wont change after even full length sizing.
    I've replaced pins, and made everything tight, but prior to sending them out for barrel fitting I check to see if the breech block is square to the bore. It's an easy fix to mill the face flat, or to build up the back of the block to get it back to square. But it always needs to be checked prior to rebarreling.

  13. #33
    Boolit Master
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    If the brass I am using is Starline then the right star is placed at 12 O'clock. If the rifle doesn't use Starline brass then I notch it and the notch is always placed at 12 O'clock. The 12 O'clock doesn't have to be prefect but I try to get it close. Neck size all the brass and so far have not had an issue.

  14. #34
    Boolit Master
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    Good to know guys. I am in the waiting end of getting a 7mm barrel and getting it put on by John Taylor , already profiled. I have a minty 7mm, and have shot factory ammo, with none of the problems spoke of here. I have a couple of issues of Precision Shooting, who did and in depth study of all the reported problems associated with the 7x57 Rolling block and a few examples of the rifle. Good reading, I wont go into all the details, but the accuracy they got was astounding, using both jacketed and cast boolits. Mine will proabably be shot using cast more than anything, so no wild hot rod rounds. If the 7mm dont pan out, 30/30 it is.

  15. #35
    Boolit Buddy paul edward's Avatar
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    My vote is for the 7x57. With a new barrel, tight chamber and modest loads, this could be the best of several good choices.

    I have a military surplus #5 with the original generous chamber and 30" barrel, but it shoots very well.


    If I had such an action, I would re barrel it in 6.5x57.

  16. #36
    Boolit Master marlinman93's Avatar
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    Anymore I've gotten where I don't hotrod anything I shoot. Even my varmint rifle in .22-250 seems to shoot much tighter groups at a modest 3400 fps, than if I load it to max velocities it can safely be loaded to.
    And since 95% of what I own was made prior to 1898, I just feel comfortable with loads that cruise along at lower speeds and pressures.

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Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check