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Thread: Knife Measurements

  1. #1
    Boolit Master



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    Knife Measurements

    I知 thinking of investing in a few high quality kitchen (Butcher type)knives. I知 looking exclusively online. I see knives of a certain length, but don稚 know if that is blade length or total length. I think it must be blade length, because the handles seem to be the same size.

    Also any recommendations on good quality knives? Is Sabatier still considered top quality as they once were? I hear a lot people talking about about Japanese knives. I was hoping to keep the price between $50-100, but am willing to pay more if it makes a big difference.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Boolit Buddy
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    I have gone back to old carbon steel knives. Slowly replacing the Henkels with Old Hickory a couple of knives at a time. Easier to make them sharp!

  3. #3
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    Wusthof and J.A. Henckels are good quality knives with German steel in them.
    If you prefer oriental steel, check out Shun.

  4. #4
    Boolit Master pietro's Avatar
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    .

    The advertised sizes are the blade lengths.....

    I find my Henckles kitchen knife set easy to keep sharp because I touch them up after every use - even the serrated blades.

    .

    .
    Experience is a wonderful thing - It lets you recognize a mistake, when you make it again.

  5. #5
    Boolit Buddy
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    Victorinox Fibrox professional chef's knives; used to be known in the US as R.H. Forschner, but are the same thing:

    https://www.victorinox.com/us/en/Pro...E&gclsrc=aw.ds

  6. #6
    Boolit Master



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    Quote Originally Posted by pietro View Post
    .

    The advertised sizes are the blade lengths.....

    I find my Henckles kitchen knife set easy to keep sharp because I touch them up after every use - even the serrated blades.

    .

    .
    When you touch them up, is that with a steel or stone?

  7. #7
    Boolit Master



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    It looks like a lot of the newer knives have a handle on an angle to the blade. Is that for better ergonomics?

  8. #8
    Boolit Bub
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    Give Dexter knives a look. Made in the U.S.A. Good quality reasonable cost. I use them in my Sausage Shack and in the kitchen.

  9. #9
    Boolit Grand Master

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    Quote Originally Posted by GregLaROCHE View Post
    It looks like a lot of the newer knives have a handle on an angle to the blade. Is that for better ergonomics?
    Depending on the blade style it can keep your knuckles off the cutting board.
    My Straight Shooters thread:
    http://castboolits.gunloads.com/show...raight-shooter

    The Pewter Pictures and Hallmarks thread:
    http://castboolits.gunloads.com/show...-and-hallmarks

  10. #10
    Boolit Grand Master tazman's Avatar
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    My wife had a set of Kershaw kitchen knives when we got married 11 years ago. During that time they have never been touched by a stone or belt sander.
    They came with a steel which turned out to be a very good one. A few strokes on the steel and they cut just fine. No need for a stone.
    I use them more than I do my own knife set.
    I have no idea how old they are.
    Wife says they are at least thirty years old.

  11. #11
    Boolit Master



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    Another question, how do you know your buying a good steel?

  12. #12
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    Knife Measurements

    Quote Originally Posted by GregLaROCHE View Post
    Another question, how do you know your buying a good steel?
    Reputable manufacturers will state what the Rockwell hardness is of their steel and what type of alloy their steel it is.

  13. #13
    Boolit Master

    alamogunr's Avatar
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    If you want to see just about every quality kitchen knife available, go here:

    https://tinyurl.com/y3arpb66

    They have good sales occasionally. Most of our kitchen knives are Henckels but since we are not nearly accomplished chefs, I keep them sharp to avoid accidents and don't have any problem passing up the expensive Japanese knives
    John
    W.TN

  14. #14
    Boolit Grand Master

    Wayne Smith's Avatar
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    Wow - all those knives and only three choices for a Butcher knife! Just not as common as they used to be, I guess.
    Wayne the Shrink

    There is no 'right' that requires me to work for you or you to work for me!

  15. #15
    Boolit Master

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    I guess "chef's" don't use butcher knives. Not sophisticated enough. The closest thing I have is a knife my dad made more than 50 years ago from an industrial band saw blade. Not fancy but if I ever get it sharp, it stays that way.
    John
    W.TN

  16. #16
    Boolit Master
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    for me when it comes to wanting anything with a blade I go to the knife super market

    https://www.smkw.com

  17. #17
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    Two years ago at a antique/thrift store, I stumbled onto a older (USA made) Chicago Cutlery chef knife, probably from 1980s. It was in nice shape, I bought it and brought it home, touched up the edge and boy oh boy, is it a nice knife (especially for $5).

    I worked at a hardware store as a teenager in the 1980s, the store sold these knives and I forgot how good they are. Well, since that 'find' two years ago, I've been looking and collecting nice condition USA made CC knives. I think I am up to 6. The last was a poultry knife for 50「 at a garage sale, while the blade still retained the proper shape, Bubba used a grinding wheel on the blade sides, so it's all gouged up. I tried to polish the gouged grinding lines, to no avail. But I put an edge on it, and it cuts like a dream.

    So, no need to spend lots of money on kitchen knives.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    的f someone has a gun and is trying to kill you, it would be reasonable to shoot back with your own gun.
    ― The Dalai Lama, Seattle Times, May 2001

  18. #18
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    TNsailorman's Avatar
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    I have and have used a lot of different knives over my 78 plus years but one thing I have learned the hard way. A high price does not mean a better knife--just a higher price. Exotic steels have their place but that place is more for collectibles and extreme field use. I have reluctantly come to the conclusion that for kitchen use Chicago or Old Hickory are plenty good enough. Good steel and easy to "touch up" when needed. my experience anyway, james

  19. #19
    Boolit Master



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    Thru the years I had a few of those Old Hickory knives. They were my favorite for years. I bought some carving sets from before WW2 for the starting bid of ten bucks. The knife and fork combination in a nice box. They served me well, being easy to put a good edge on. (That was what I didn’t like about stainless before, but now with diamond stones, that no longer seems to be a problem) The problem is if you’re not carving a turkey on a special day, they didn’t get taken care of like they should and I was always fighting them getting rusty.

    A year ago my son came to visit for a couple of weeks and ordered a good quality all stainless knife from Amazon, because he hated using my old blackened ones. Well that is a great knife. It’s the one that always gets used these days, so when I saw five stainless knives of assorted sizes claiming to be Sabatier for $15 starting bid I bought them. Only one was Sabatier, but the others were ok, but badly abused. I gave them to the sharpener who comes to the local market once a month, to see what he could do. Twenty bucks later I had some really nice cutting knives. So much that I quickly bought and installed a magnetic holder. Those holders are great.

    So now I’m converted to stainless and am thinking about adding a big butcher knife with a thick blade or two. I still love high carbon steel, but for every day cooking, when you’re in a hurry most of the time, I’m giving stainless a try.

  20. #20
    Boolit Buddy

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    To me the Wusthof 8" chef knife is one of the best knives in the kitchen. If it appears a little dull just use a steel on it. Have not had to sharpen it on a stone in 10 years.

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