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Thread: to all newbie/young casters

  1. #1
    Boolit Buddy
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    The Netherlands Europa
    Posts
    165

    to all newbie/young casters

    I am a caster from sinds i was 8 now i am 53.
    I still cast a lot.
    I want to give you a reminder to be safe, use proper ventilation in your shed and protection if you are going to retrieve lead from a boolit catcher.....wear a proper mask!!!
    It toke me 15 years to get my level from 300 down to 113(today result).
    Nerve damage is already done it wont repair, never....and kids are out of the question.
    Lead will get out of your bones(storage for high lead) but it will take longer.
    Probably my levels where higher than 300 because several times "acute" lead poising.(flu like symptoms)
    Still shooting and casting love both of them.
    But please be careful.
    When retrieving from what ever boolit catcher wear breathing protection: triple f! when sand hits by a boolit it will turn into quarts.
    So that one is twice the damage.
    When casting use good and strong ventilation for lead vapors.
    Was your hands, wear gloves(blue plastic dentist) dont eat drink or smoke during a casting session, if you must, wash your hands and face.

    Happy casting and cast all you want but be safe!

    Cheers

  2. #2
    Boolit Master


    MrWolf's Avatar
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    Apr 2013
    Location
    NE West Virginia
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    2,635
    Good advice for anyone. Thanks.

  3. #3
    Boolit Mold
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
    Posts
    24
    Currently using a 3M 6300 respirator mask with the 3M P100 organic vapor / filter cartridges.

  4. #4
    Boolit Buddy
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    187
    Very good advice,, but something it seems like everyone forgets,, is primer residue is just chocked full of lead... and its of a size that is very easily ingestible or absorbed.
    That 'dirty' you get handling brass and using firearms,, shooting indoors with poor ventilation,, gun cleaning with solvents and without gloves on,,etc...that is all LEAD exposure...

  5. #5
    Boolit Buddy
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    The Netherlands Europa
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    165
    @yovinny: yup also dust.
    The primers are of other consistend than lead, the older ones(overhere) mostly berdan primer, something more with zinc oxide, but that is what your body can handle.
    To much of intake on lead will be stored into your bone's until your body is "clean" enough to get that stuff out of your bone, but when breaking a bone, it will all be released at ones.
    Russel dont chance.

    I am sure more old timers can confirm this

    Best Igor

  6. #6
    Boolit Mold
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
    Posts
    24
    Been using the blue nitrile gloves for about the past 5 years when working with brass. Everything gets decapped on a Dillon 650 with a spent primer chute that puts them straight into a coffee can.
    Then the cases get cleaned. I try to use common sense along with good personal hygiene to stay safe.

  7. #7
    Boolit Grand Master fredj338's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    kalif.
    Posts
    6,213
    I have been casting for 40y. Pretty much all I shoot are lead & now coated lead. My last blood check showed about 10. I almost never shoot indoors. I dont mine from a bullet trap. Every person's physiology is diff. Proper diet & exercise, good hygiene, don't shoot indoors.
    EVERY GOOD SHOOTER NEEDS TO BE A HANDLOADER.
    NRA Cert. Inst. Met. Reloading & Basic Pistol

  8. #8
    keep the temperature down in your lead operations. from the osha manual:https://www.osha.gov/dts/osta/otm/otm_v/otm_v_3.html

    "Soldering and brazing operations present similar health hazards (airborne lead fumes) but to a different degree. Most soldering operations occur at temperatures that are less than 800F. The melting point of the filler metals is usually quite low (<600F) and the activity does not generate significant concentrations of metal fumes. Brazing operations usually occur at temperatures in excess of 800F. The temperature of the operation is of major importance because temperature determines the vapor pressure of the metals that are heated and therefore the potential concentration of metal fumes to which the employee may be exposed." This doesn't specify a specific temperature that is safe but clearly indicates that temperature ranges very close to those typically selected for lead boolit smelting have a significant impact on lead fume generation

    significant fumes @ 932F+: https://www.labour.gov.on.ca/english...me%20particles.

    "However, soldering is usually carried out at a temperature of around 716F and significant lead fume is only evolved at temperatures above 842F. https://diamondenv.wordpress.com/201...ing-soldering/

    This is why I think uncontrolled heating of lead smelters (especially propane/gas) is very likely to overheat the lead and generate fumes, without any benefit to the boolit maker. Use, electric, use PID, or at least an accurate thermocouple so you know what the temperature is and can turn down the heat as appropriate.

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Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check