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Thread: Glad I'm not the only person trimming 44 magnum brass.

  1. #21
    Boolit Master
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    Once again a clear thinking person has responded. I am in complete agreement with Mr Smale. Once a good load is reached and then one spends countless hours on the bench trying to get another quarter inch smaller group is not good. That extra time is much, much, much, much, much better spent practicing with the good load shooting from different positions like ones used in the hunting situations than chasing the elusive swoon over benchrest group.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lloyd Smale View Post
    most bullets have a crimp grove plenty big enough to allow some variation in length. If you crimp so hard that it causes chambering problems with untrimmed brass your no doubt over crimping. Bottom line is a 44 mag is a 100 yard game gun. You surely aren't going to see accuracy suffer so much that a kill shot is no longer a kill shot. Last I heard there isn't 44mag bench rest competition. The 44 mag is a hunting handgun at my house. What cured me from being so anal was the 475s and 500s. I spent DAYS chasing one inch groups with them. Beating the crap out of myself on the bench. For what? Smallest thing I shot with them were deer and the largest were bison and water buffalo. 99 percent of my hunting with handgun was standing on my own two feet shooting offhand and theres NOBODY I know that can shoot a one inch group off hand with a 500 Linebaugh! A 2 inch group is all you need for any wheel gun hunting of big game. Your time is much better spent perfecting your off hand shooting then bench shooting a gun to get tiny groups. I will chase accuracy on a bolt action rifle used to shoot out at 300 yards or farther off a rest but even then it can sometimes be a waste of time. Like I said I load to shoot. Id much rather spend time shooting then trimming brass to get a 1/10 of an inch better group when the only time your going to see it is off that bench. I don't hunt off a bench and I don't shoot competition off a bench. A guy that's perfected his off hand shooting and trigger control using a gun that shoots 2 inch groups is going to be A LOT more effective then someone who spends there time in the loading room. Id dare say ive killed more or at least as much big game with a 44 mag as anyone here. Can you tell me you've actually missed an animal because you didn't trim brass!!! I sure haven't. My misses were my fault not the loads.
    We Know Mass Cannot Be Weighed But It Has Newtonian Weight And That Is Derived From Kilograms And Kilograms Can Be Converted to Pounds. But, Still Mass Cannot Be Weighed. But How is the kilograms obtained? Can Kilograms Be Weighed? Evidentally Yes It Can. But, Still Mass Cannot Be Weighed So Kilograms Must Not Exist. Funny Isn't It.
    One good thing out of this the next time I'm at the doctors and they want to weigh me I'll tell them mass cannot be weighed.

  2. #22
    Boolit Master Bazoo's Avatar
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    Interesting responses. I shoot handguns from the bench, with my hands supported, but not with a rest. It's practice that's beneficial in developing trigger control and grip and sight picture consistency. But I also practice offhand shooting in both target style and defensive stuff.

    I crimp pretty heavy on all revolver loads normally. I've found somewhere in the range of .010 difference in length using mixed brass. Not that one brand is long or short but rather there will be an odd couple of x headstamps that are longer than norm. Rather than measure them all I trim them all. I have measured all the brass of a given lot to cull out the unduly short and long examples.

    Lloyd, thanks for your comments. You shoot much more than me. At one time I was shooting 500 rounds a week with most of it rimfire but now I'm doing good to shoot 200 rounds a month.
    Last edited by Bazoo; 06-30-2020 at 10:39 PM.

  3. #23
    Boolit Buddy
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    It seems we have flapping gums here. I don't trim my traditional handgun calibers, but I do think trimming once to uniform the length on revolver cases would give a better end result when you use a heath roll crimp. I finish 4th or better in any match I ever shot in, so hear me roar...honestly, spare us.
    Take a kid to the range, you'll both be glad you did.

  4. #24
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    Lloyd Smale's Avatar
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    do what you want but theres not need for personal attacks here.
    Soldier of God, sixgun junky, Retired electrical lineman. My office was a 100 feet in the air, closer to God the better

  5. #25
    Boolit Buddy Win94ae's Avatar
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    Um, this really isn't that big of a deal.
    If your brass is longer than you want it, and you feel like trimming it because of the extra weight; by all means, trim it.

  6. #26
    Boolit Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by win94ae View Post
    um, this really isn't that big of a deal.
    If your brass is longer than you want it, and you feel like trimming it because of the extra weight; by all means, trim it.
    like !

  7. #27
    Boolit Master Bazoo's Avatar
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    So, many folks think trimming revolver brass is a waste of time and effort. But what about consistency in the length and then crimp. If you don't trim, do you cull out the long brass? Or is your crimp so light that it will allow for the variation in length? Unless of course you use a collet crimp die as some have said.

  8. #28
    Boolit Master
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    In my experience it makes more difference if you are seating and crimping in the same die the longer cases may scrape the bullet when being crimped while seating with a separate crimp die the mouth of the case will be over the crimp groove so no scraping when crimping , yes some of the crimps will be a little heavier than others but will not have a practical impact on accuracy for my use. And there are people here that have much more knowledge and experience than I have whose opinions i very much respect that say the same thing.
    I have done it both ways and gave up trimming straight wall pistol cases when I went to separate crimp dies.
    If for some reason you wound up with some really short cases (like some Hornady) they are in a separate batch.
    The Lee carbide factory crimp die does the same thing for me on auto pistol rounds about 90% of the time.

    Like win94ae said if it makes you feel better , or what you are loading for demands the extra precision trim them.

  9. #29
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    Do you keep your revolver brass in cases and mark how often it has been fired? Do you measure every five or seven times it's shot to see if it's stretching? If so you probably trim all cases when it is. If my loads are all crimping in the groove I don't bother to check length but surely do check it when I have one that doesn't.
    My own handgun brass these days is thrown in a bag, tumbled, checked for cracks and loaded. When I get a loose primer pocket it's tossed and I check a whole bunch when I do find they have stretched.
    RCBS's X dies have shown me far more cases stretch longitudinally from a sizer die than from being fired.
    [The Montana Gianni] Front sight and squeeze

  10. #30
    The Brass Man Four-Sixty's Avatar
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    I have no comment on trimming and any effect on accuracy. I do trim 38 Special and other straight wall pistol brass to aid with more consistent seating depths.

    I used to shoot range pickup brass. So, I had quite a mix of headstamps. While loading Magtech brass in particular, it'd hangup in the die. I measured the Magtech brass and found it to be longer than other brands. I started trimming the Magtech brass with a Lee case length gauge trimmer and found I could remove a lot of brass doing so. They never hung up in the die after being trimmed. I then segregated the Magtech brass and kept track of the number of firings. I got up to half a dozen firings on that brass and it never needed trimming again.

    I like Magtech brass. I read somewhere long ago where someone did a longevity study on it and it outlasted many brands by twice as long. Anyway, I bought a bunch of it years ago. In my experience it is longer in length than other brands by a wide margin. So, I always fire new cases one time, then trim them before reloading. It is a chore, but I feel it eliminates a lot of variance in length and I easily get more uniform seating long after.

    I shoot Starline's 360DW in my Handi rifle. I have batches going on 3 or 4 firings and I see quite a variance in case length. They'll get trimmed to so I can get more uniform seating depth to.
    “Useful undertakings which require sustained attention and vigorous precision in order to succeed often end up by being abandoned, for, in America, as elsewhere, the people move forward by sudden impulses and short-lived efforts.”

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Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check