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Thread: Stevens Maynard Jr

  1. #1
    Boolit Buddy
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    Stevens Maynard Jr

    Hi: Looking for some information and help. Hoping to find someone that can help me out with a tracing of the stock. I have found pics of the stock, some having a contoured stock and others having basically a flat stock with rounded edges. If someone can help me out it would be much appreciated. Best, Dan

  2. #2
    Boolit Master pietro's Avatar
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    .

    Your best bet for help would be to contact a Ballard expert, who just so happens to be a fellow board member here - marlinman93

    At the top of this thread, click on "community", then select "M", - his contact info is on (about) the middle of pp14.


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    Experience is a wonderful thing - It lets you recognize a mistake, when you make it again.

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    Boolit Master Shawlerbrook's Avatar
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    Ditto on marlinman

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    Boolit Master marlinman93's Avatar
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    Not sure I can be of much help, as my involvement with and knowledge of Stevens and Stevens Maynards is limited. I would suggest some people who might be able to help you with 90" inletted stocks to replace on your gun, but that's about all.
    I've had great luck with Crossno's gun service in Oklahoma City, and you might also call CPA as they too do stocks.

  5. #5
    Boolit Master Drm50's Avatar
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    I had Stevens Maynard Jr. for years. The stock was a flat plank. Rounded edges. Stock was drilled through and connected with stock bolt. Simple flat steel butt plate. Also the stock was not Walnut I believe it was pine or fir.

  6. #6
    Boolit Master uscra112's Avatar
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    The 1905 Stevens catalog claims the stock to be "oiled walnut". Later today I'll try to post a photo of the catalog picture, which will at least give an idea of what the stock should look like. They were indeed just a flat board, rounded top and bottom. Buttplate was steel.

    Stevens actually owned the rights to the fabled Maynard, having bought out Massachusetts Arms, who were the maker of it. The Maynard Jr. is, however, a very poor relation to the original design. It was made to be even cheaper than the already-cheap Crack Shot, and as such has to be limited to the mildest of modern ammo.
    Eleutheromaniac

  7. #7
    Boolit Master Drm50's Avatar
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    I have seen Stevens Maynard Jrs with no butt plate, just horizontal grooves. When I was 5 my dad bought me a Marlin 1897 carbine. Very nice 22 but at 5yrs I couldn’t hold it up to shoot it. A friend of the family gave me the Maynard Jr and it was in like new shape. Easy for a 5yr old to handle.The stock on mine was not walnut.

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  9. #9
    Boolit Master uscra112's Avatar
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    FWIW gunpartscorp.com (i.e. Numrich) may send you a battered-up old piece of wood that's worse than what you've got. Ask me how I know.
    Eleutheromaniac

  10. #10
    Boolit Master marlinman93's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by uscra112 View Post
    FWIW gunpartscorp.com (i.e. Numrich) may send you a battered-up old piece of wood that's worse than what you've got. Ask me how I know.
    Anything used from Numrich is a crap shoot. And considering how plain a Stevens Maynard Jr. stock is, you'd be better off buying a piece of plain walnut the correct thickness, and fabricating your own stock from scratch.

  11. #11
    Boolit Master uscra112's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marlinman93 View Post
    Anything used from Numrich is a crap shoot. And considering how plain a Stevens Maynard Jr. stock is, you'd be better off buying a piece of plain walnut the correct thickness, and fabricating your own stock from scratch.
    Absolutely. It's about the easiest stockmaking job there is, except for boring that through-hole.

    That guns.com writer didn't bother doing any worthwhile research, did he? Maynard rifles were only made by Massachusetts Arms. Joshua Stevens bought M.A. when the old firm was liquidated, but there never was a "Stevens Maynard" All Stevens ever made was this toy, and another much better boys' rifle called the Marksman. Both are underlever-operated tip-down actions, but the similarity to the real Maynard ends there.

    The story of the buyout is worth repeating. Joshua Stevens was one of plank owners of Massachusetts Arms, but who soon after the Civil War went off to found his own firm. When Massachusetts Arms went bankrupt in 1892, Joshua bought it to make sure that Dr. Maynard's wife and heirs would be protected financially, and to keep the workers employed. Easy to do since both firms were in Chicopee Falls, but not in keeping with the usual cut-throat competition that characterized the firearms industry of the time.

    I've been collecting and researching boys' rifles for some years now, but I have never seen a Maynard Jr. worth the asking price. They were super-cheap, and consequently were not treated with any respect. But consider this: There was a version of the Maynard Jr. that was a smoothbore, specifically for .22 shot cartridges. I'd bet they accounted for a serious reduction in the sparrow population wherever they were sold. So it would be right and proper to salvage a ruined bore by running a reamer through to smooth it up, and then stock up on shot cartridges.

    Hmmm - thinking about it now. . . . . The stock on a Marksman (Model 12 or it's sister the Model 101) is mighty similar. I wonder if they'd interchange?

    Egad, I'm wordy today. Cabin fever from the lockdown?
    Eleutheromaniac

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