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Thread: To grease or not to grease c/b revolver

  1. #1
    Boolit Man
    Gaseous Maximus's Avatar
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    To grease or not to grease c/b revolver

    What are your opinions on applying Crisco or the grease to the front of the percussion revolver cylinder to prevent cross fires? It used to be pretty much gospel, except recently I read in GUNS mag. that it really wasn't necessary. So what do you think?
    Oklahoma. Quite possibly the reddest state in the U.S.A. 77 counties, 2 elections, and not a single one went for B.O. Uh make that 3 elections, we didn't care much for Hillary either.

  2. #2
    Boolit Master
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  3. #3
    Boolit Master trails4u's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by charlie b View Post
    Yep.

    OP. There are volumes written on this....both here and on other sites as well. Search it out, and come to your own conclusion. I don't say this to be ugly....just that there are as many opinions on this as there are site members.

    FWIW. I don't grease the front of the cylinder. I use a greased was between powder and ball. But that's just me.....
    "Do not follow where the path might lead, go instead where there is no path and leave a trail" Ralph Waldo Emerson

  4. #4
    Hello Gaseous Maximus,

    The purpose for grease is to soften the fouling.
    Whether it's before or after the projectile is personal choice.
    One will have to experiment with to determine what works best for the individual.
    My opinion to prevent cross fires, a cartridge is the best way to go.
    Either Paper or Brass will prevent a chain fire.
    Check out the following link,
    http://www.geojohn.org/BlackPowder/bps2Mobile.html

    AntiqueSledMan.

  5. #5
    Boolit Master

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    Properly fitted cones/nipples and tight fitting caps prevent chain-fires. Just my experience. You can load without grease and shoot. BUT, fowling will build up quicker. I prefer lubed wads over the powder charge and then seat the ball. Just my way of doing it, others may vary.
    Maker of Silver Boolits for Werewolf hunting.

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  6. #6
    Boolit Master
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    Wow, three in a row that agree. So, I'll make it four.

    I started by greasing the mouth of the chambers. After firing one shot I looked and saw that most of the rest were cleared out. So, I stopped using lube at all. Never fired more than 50rnd a session. I would liberally apply some gun oil to the cylinder base pin before shooting.

    IMHO, chain firing is due to an improper fit of ball in cylinder. It is important to get a ring of lead when you seat the ball.

  7. #7
    Boolit Master
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    I still grease the front of the cylinders. Regardless of the deniers, it does help soften fouling...and is just as messy as any can describe.

    trails4u nailed it, do your own research and come to your own conclusion.
    "In general, the art of government is to take as much money as possible from one class of citizens and give it to another class of citizens" Voltaire'

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  8. #8
    Boolit Grand Master
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    I've used both methods and prefer placing greased felt wads under the ball.
    And I'll second everything Hickok wrote.

  9. #9
    Boolit Bub
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    Loose fitting caps are the main culprit in a chain fire. It "could" still happen with no grease on the front of the cylinder. I'd still grease it to soften the fouling and one extra layer of safety.
    A man cannot have too much red wine, too many books, or too much ammunition.
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  10. #10
    Boolit Master
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    I actually do both. Greased wad (Oxyoke) and Bore Butter (pine scented) over the conical I hunted with. The first deer that fell to my stainless ROA was loaded this way. When I cleaned the bore and only the fired cylinder chamber, the others still had the bore butter in place. I left the ROA, in this condition, it was late October muzzle loading season was still open. Didn't fire the gun again, till Spring/Summer. All fired, without a hitch.

    Winelover

  11. #11
    Boolit Grand Master GhostHawk's Avatar
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    I had several chain fires. Happened as the front of the cylinder holes became pitted. Allowing black powder to get crushed into those pits making a place where a spark could work its way in to the main change.

    Bore butter liberally smeared on the front of the cylinder shut down the chain fires flat. And kept the fouling softer, easier to clean.

    Now I am long since over my fling with Holy Black. I look back fondly at the things I learned and the fun I had. Not so fondly at the cleaning sessions.

    I think it would take a master pistol smith to

    A bore and line the barrel for .32sw long.
    B beg, borrow, make, or buy a new cylinder chambered in .32sw long or .32H&R mag.
    C Convert from caps to firing pin.

    Probably cost more than the gun is worth. It is a .36 caliber army style with solid frame and adjustable sights.

  12. #12
    Boolit Master
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    60+ yrs. ago CRISCO was the chose and is still it in a lot of circles. if it ain't broke don't fix it!

  13. #13
    Boolit Buddy
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    The cylinder will soon bind and you will end up bending the hand if you don't put grease or Crisco, etc. in front of the balls.
    Happened to me with a Navy Colt reproduction many years ago. After I reshaped the hand I used Crisco and never had the problem again.
    It keeps everything loose, kinda like Metamucil.

  14. #14
    Moderator Emeritus / Trusted loob groove dealer

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    I used to put a pinch of corn meal over the powder, no grease lube. I was able to shoot two or three more cylinders before the gun would bind up, than with grease.
    The solid soft lead bullet is undoubtably the best and most satisfactory expanding bullet that has ever been designed. It invariably mushrooms perfectly, and never breaks up. With the metal base that is essential for velocities of 2000 f.s. and upwards to protect the naked base, these metal-based soft lead bullets are splendid.
    John Taylor - "African Rifles and Cartridges"

    Forget everything you know about loading jacketed bullets. This is a whole new ball game!


  15. #15
    Boolit Master Nobade's Avatar
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    Lubed felt wads under the balls. Shoot as long as you want. At least in my guns.

  16. #16
    Boolit Master
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    I feel a little like Paul Matthews when he wrote the book, "40 Years With the 45-70"...but I ain't no Paul Matthews....said with tongue in cheek.

    Anyway, over 40 years of shooting C&B revolvers, (one is the second one I bought back then, an 1851 Navy....I think from Lyman), and always using Crisco or some other lube on the front of the cylinders and tight fitting caps and I've never had a chain fire. Now, watch me have one or two next time I get one of the revolvers out....

    It's like everything else, there's more than one right way to do it. Shoot them enough and you'll find one you like.
    "In general, the art of government is to take as much money as possible from one class of citizens and give it to another class of citizens" Voltaire'

    The common virtue of capitalism is the sharing of equal opportunity. The common vice of socialism is the equal sharing of misery

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  17. #17
    Boolit Master
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    And to add one more thing, cylinder to barrel gap. Most of the encountered specimens have been very generous in this area increasing the effect of many things. The larger the gap, the more ---.

  18. #18
    Boolit Master Good Cheer's Avatar
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    Me too, still got the Navy Arms 1861 purchased 1976 at Deep River Armory in Houston. It loves a full charge of FFFg behind boolits cast with a Lee 9mm round nose mold I drilled out back then to 3/8". It barks, knocks red bricks off of fence posts, and actually has a little muzzle flip with that combo. And it won't never make a flash over.

    These prevent it too.


  19. #19
    Boolit Master
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    Hmm, clever Good Cheer! Well done!
    "In general, the art of government is to take as much money as possible from one class of citizens and give it to another class of citizens" Voltaire'

    The common virtue of capitalism is the sharing of equal opportunity. The common vice of socialism is the equal sharing of misery

    NRA Benefactor 2008

  20. #20
    Boolit Master Nobade's Avatar
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    Nice! Very similar to the moulds that Erasgone is selling now, reproductions of the original revolver bullets in 36 and 44 caliber.

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Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check