Inline FabricationTitan ReloadingMidSouth Shooters SupplyLee Precision
ADvertise hereWidenersRepackboxRotoMetals2

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 44

Thread: Tumbling and lubing primed brass - yes - no?

  1. #21
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    1,245
    Wonder if you could seal up the cases by pressing the mouth into a piece of wax, tumble them, then use a pick to get the wax out.

    Might be less effort to deprime them.

    Or tumble them after loaded.

  2. #22
    Boolit Master

    Winger Ed.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Just outside Gun Barrel City, Texas
    Posts
    2,364
    I'd load & shoot 'em.

    If they don't look pretty enough, either hand polish them or wear dark glasses when you load 'em.
    It wasn't playing the blame game, finding fault, and complaining about every little thing that made America great.
    It was God, guns, and guts.


    Never pick a fight with old people.
    If they don't think they can win it: They'll just kill you.

  3. #23
    Boolit Grand Master

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    England,Ar
    Posts
    6,184
    I have tumbled primed brass that was not loaded and I had a few misfires. I don't remember what grit corncob I was using but apparently some managed to work its way into the flash hole.

    I have also dry tumbled loaded ammo with no problems. No unusual pressure signs, nothing different on the chronograph, no change in the group size or point of impact.

    My advice is to load it and then tumble it.

    Depriming it is always an option but you have the extra work.

  4. #24
    Boolit Master KYCaster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Rineyville no longer, New Haven by way of Park City
    Posts
    2,203
    Quote Originally Posted by lightman View Post
    I have tumbled primed brass that was not loaded and I had a few misfires. I don't remember what grit corncob I was using but apparently some managed to work its way into the flash hole.

    I have also dry tumbled loaded ammo with no problems. No unusual pressure signs, nothing different on the chronograph, no change in the group size or point of impact.

    My advice is to load it and then tumble it.

    Depriming it is always an option but you have the extra work.

    Same here, I had misfires and hang fires after tumbling primed brass.
    I also tumbled 45ACP loaded with HP38 powder and found that velocity increased slightly and ES and SD tightened up some. Results were repeatable over several attempts.
    Based on those experiments, I no longer do either.

    Jerry
    Buzzard's luck!! Can't kill nothin', nothin'll die!!

  5. #25
    Boolit Master
    Land Owner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Mims, FL
    Posts
    723
    I acquired 10's of thousands of factory and handloaded rifle and pistol ammunition and ~100 thousand brass cases in many calibers from a competition reloader's estate (my bosses' father). Most of the brass cases, in storage for years, both loaded and unloaded, primed, deprimed, spent primer, and once new without primers, were corroded and/or tarnished.

    In four walnut media Franklin Arsenal (2) and RCBS (2) tumblers I cleaned A.) loaded ammo, and B.) once new without primers, deprimed, and spent primed cases for weeks.

    Not one loaded round discharged. Not one "shaken" round of loaded ammo misfired. I cannot speak to the accuracy of each round, before vs. after, but there was no dissatisfaction in this shooter in the "as-modified" rounds from shaking.

    Non-loaded primed cases are NOT recommended for media tumbling. Tiny bits of media WILL clog some of the flash holes. Media dust WILL migrate into EVERY flash hole. Primed brass can be individually dipped, up to but not including the primer, in a 20% concentration (ymmv) of lemon juice and polished clean or 000 steel wooled.

    My recommendations? Load those rounds and then tumble them. From personal experience, I believe the loaded round will be clean and unaffected...or...deprime and tumble. Depriming live primers, done with smooth and even strokes, is not "reactive".

    How many Billions of WW2 ammo have traveled the world, been shaken by some of our Nation's finest, and STILL shoot to point of aim if we do our part behind the rifle or pistol? Some days you just gotta do what you gotta do.
    If it was easy, anybody could do it.

  6. #26
    Boolit Master FISH4BUGS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Inland from Seacoast New Hampshire
    Posts
    2,103
    Thanks to all for the advice and sharing experiences.
    I guess I just need to get over my desire for shiny new looking brass. I'm sure that thousands of dollars worth of therapy will take care of that. Maybe some trauma in my childhood is driving me to want new looking brass.
    I'll load them then tumble them shiny.
    Seems logical and reasonable.
    Collector and shooter of guns with selector switches and threaded barrels. Collector of suppressors, SBR's, AOW's and SBS's. Lead and brass scrounger. Never too much brass, lead or components in inventory! Always looking to win beauty contests with my reloads.

  7. #27
    Boolit Grand Master


    jonp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Planet Reality
    Posts
    6,327
    I don't. My concern is that I use walnut media in a tumbler and I don't want a piece to get stuck in the primer.
    I am become death. The destroyer of worlds

    We all do our duty when there is not cost to it, honor comes easier then. Sooner or later there comes a day in every man's life when it is not so easy, a day when he must choose and live with it for the rest of his days.

    The further society drifts from the truth, the more it will hate those that speak it
    George Orwell

  8. #28
    Boolit Buddy

    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    west Tn
    Posts
    343
    Been tumbling loaded ammo {.223} in walnut media for several years, never had a round to go off accidently. Brass will come out looking like factory fresh. If using lead boolits the walnut media may dull the finish some. Have not tumbled loaded powdered coated boolits but media will probably dull the shine on it too.

  9. #29
    Boolit Buddy varmintpopper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    cental calif
    Posts
    162
    Carefully punch out the primers, Dispose of them properly. Tumble Your cases bright and shiny. reload with new primers and components.
    You will have confidence in Your nice shiny ammo. The price of a couple hundred primers is not worth the risk of failure, "Next to life, Give Me sight"

    Good Shooting

    Lindy

  10. #30
    Boolit Grand Master WILCO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Where there is lots of things to do.
    Posts
    5,726
    Chuck them in a Zip Trim.
    Polish them with a green scotch brite.

    Easy peasy.
    Success is not the key to happiness. Happiness is the key to success. If you love what you are doing, you will be successful. - Albert Schweitzer

    Yeah, I love cast iron cookware.

    Life is too short. Live yours to the fullest.

  11. #31
    Boolit Grand Master

    Wayne Smith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Hampton Roads, Virginia
    Posts
    11,595
    not worth cleaning, unless you want to waste the time. Load and shoot. Much more fun!
    Wayne the Shrink

    There is no 'right' that requires me to work for you or you to work for me!

  12. #32
    Boolit Buddy Scrounge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    OKC Metro
    Posts
    185
    Quote Originally Posted by FISH4BUGS View Post
    OK...so let's explore that.
    The cases are primed. I looked at the primer being used and it would have to be a VERY small piece of debris to get in the anvil (not that it couldn't happen), and the flash hole is already plugged by the primer.
    I really don't see how it could get clogged.
    Have you actually done this before and did it work for you?
    Just trying to logically flesh this out.........
    I just got my first vibratory tumbler a few weeks ago. I've run exactly one batch of brass through it, a mix of 30-06 & .45acp. I've got at least a dozen shells, mostly 30-06, with bits of the corn cob media stuck in the flash hole. Several more with a cluster packed in there. This was a mixed batch of rounds some of which had been decapped, and some not. There are several of each with stuff in the flash hole. I do have other things to do right now that mean getting the bits out is going to have to wait a while. Think about this for a moment. There are two sides to the flash hole. The primer only plugs one of them. The media can get to one side if you're cleaning primed brass, both sides if unprimed/decapped. At least mine were fired brass. You're an adult, you can make your own choices and live with your own results, of course. Personally, I'd just shoot 'em, and then clean and reload.

  13. #33
    Boolit Grand Master

    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Northwest Ohio
    Posts
    11,602
    You can load and tumble keeping the drum fuller than normal to save fall and banging. Shouldn't be a big issue. Or hit the pet store or section of grocery store, walmarts and pick up some coarse ground walnut or corn cobs. In a breezy day pour this slowly between 2 containers to remove fines. Treat as needed and use this the only dust will be what is produced tumbling. And being coarse enough it shouldnt plug flash holes. A gallon sized or 2 container should be enough. When this is done save this for a precleaner for really dirty brass.

    To lube these cases a bath towel can be used with case lube. You might try a few cases in a towel with auto polish just work by hand a few hundred at a time.

  14. #34
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    OKC , Oklahoma
    Posts
    1,864
    Quote Originally Posted by Wayne Smith View Post
    not worth cleaning, unless you want to waste the time. Load and shoot. Much more fun!
    Yup clean them next time.

  15. #35
    Boolit Master JoeJames's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Arkansas Delta
    Posts
    521
    RCBS decapping pins are usually $3.29.00 for five. I have two left to go. Bent one this weekend sizing and depriming 223 brass. Just a reminder that it is always good to have a few extras just in case.
    You Can Vote Your Way Into Socialism, But You Have To Shoot Your Way Out of it.

  16. #36
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Baldwin Co, across bay from Mobile, AL
    Posts
    865
    Quote Originally Posted by rbuck351 View Post
    Load them, put them in your gun where you can't see them and pretend they are bright and shiny. Then shoot them for accuracy and compare to ones that were actually bright and shiny. Perfect time to see if shiny brass works any better than tarnished brass. IMHO bright and shiny brass looks good on the shelf but has no other function.
    This wins my vote!

  17. #37
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    South Western NC
    Posts
    2,220
    Quote Originally Posted by remy3424 View Post
    I would be more concerned about debris getting in to the primer and filling it along with the flash-hole. Just shoot them and do what you need to do after this firing. If they are clean, stop worring about it....thinking way too much about it, get them loaded and then get out and empty them with all the time you have now...then citrus clean and polish until you are happy!
    There's the proper answer. There's no way primed cases in a tumbler would detonate like a bomb but tumbling wouldn't accomplish anything of value anyway and there is indeed a small chance you could induce problems with plugged flash holes.

    Men have been reloading brass cases since the mid 1800s, no one felt the need to shine cases like jewelry and doing so adds absolutely nothing to the quality of the ammo.

    I'm a weak and well led gimmick sheep so I finally broke down and bought a vib tumbler a year or two after Lyman marketed the first ones in the mid-70s. It's on its third motor now and I still use it most of the time but I'm too old (i.e., experienced) to harbor delusions about the value of shiny stuff. I'm a gunner who reloads for accuracy, there's no way in deep south Florida I'd ever be concerned about dull brass or shine a single case by hand.

    So ... just load it and shoot it. Then, if you really want glittery cases, tumble polish them without primers before you reload them.

  18. #38
    Boolit Master
    NoZombies's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    N. Florida
    Posts
    2,374
    I've known a few small commercial loaders, all of them tumbled their loaded ammo as a last step before packaging for sale. At least one of those guys had been doing it for over 20 years and who knows how many millions of rounds of ammo without incident. I've tumbled loaded ammo that had been sitting and had gotten a little corrosion beyond tarnish. I can't speak to the accuracy before/after, it was all destined for SMG's and I wanted to make sure it was corrosion free beforehand.
    Nozombies.com Practical Zombie Survival

    Collecting .32 molds. Please let me know if you have one you don't need, cause I might "need" it!

  19. #39
    Boolit Buddy
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Beattie, TX
    Posts
    114
    I know, the OP was about just tumbling primed cases but some of the posts addressed other concerns. There is an exhaustive thread over on AR15.com about tumbling loaded ammo. You'll have to search for it but the Cliff notes version is loaded rounds were tumbled for a couple of hundred (or maybe more, I can't remember) hours. No powder degradation or rounds went off. I've always tumble my loaded ammo for 30 minutes to remove case sizing or bullet lube from cast boolits. Done it for almost 30 years now.

  20. #40
    Boolit Buddy Mike Kerr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Garland, Tx
    Posts
    378
    I guess anything could happen but in reality corn cob or walnut hull tumbling does not cause primer detonation. It just doesn't. BUT I don't tumble primed brass as a matter of reloading procedure - I just don't do it except in unusual circumstances like the OP has.
    regards,


Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check