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Thread: Ream or Turn Case Neck?

  1. #1
    Boolit Buddy
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    Ream or Turn Case Neck?

    I've been contemplating converting Lapua .308 brass to .260Rem and possibly .284Win to 6.5-284.

    When Precision Shooting and its predecessor were still published, I thought that I read that when you reduced the neck diameter, you needed to ream the neck. Is this still the prevailing thought?

    I have all the neck turning equipment, but no neck reamers (and not sure who would carry them).

    Thank you, Richard
    Isn't a 9mm just a .45 set on stun? -- Amy W.

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  2. #2
    Boolit Master

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    Depending on your chamber you may not need to ream or turn. If a factory chamber, you likely won't. What is the diameter of a fired case neck? If loaded ammo is 0.002" smaller, then you should be good. That would be about 0.003" neck clearance. What are your measurements on fired necks and loaded cases now with the brass you have.

  3. #3
    Boolit Buddy
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    RG 1911,
    The only case I neck ream is my .17 Javelina. On some of my cases I get a "doughnut" at the neck/case junction and ream to remove it.
    Check your brass and see if you have that problem. If not, don't ream.
    Blkpwdrbuff
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  4. #4
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    M-Tecs's Avatar
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    Reaming is quicker but turning gives better results. When necking down necks do get thicker and that may or may not be an issue. In my experience neck wall thickness tends to get more uneven. For me reaming is reserved for "doughnut" issues that are hard to resolve with turning.
    2nd Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. - "A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed."

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  5. #5
    Boolit Master
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    Turning when necessiary, gives much more consistent results. The case is turned concentric with the inside of the neck. The pilot insures this. The neck thickness is even all the way around. In almost all cases, this is more desirable. You may not even have to ream, or turn, unless you want more consistency of neck diameters.

  6. #6
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    When pulling down from larger caliber to smaller I ream to remove donut that can form.

  7. #7
    Boolit Buddy
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    Thanks to all for the information. One reason I asked is because both the 260Rem and the 6.5-284 have tight necks, so expecting the neck to become thicker, I'm preparing for whatever I might need to do. As I mentioned, I already turn the necks for concentricity and to ensure there is sufficient room for expansion. The 260 is particularly fussy since it's a semi-auto.

    Concerning reaming donuts, is Brownell's the normal source for reamers? Do you buy a reamer of bullet diameter or ...?

    Thank you, Richard
    Isn't a 9mm just a .45 set on stun? -- Amy W.

    "When you disarm the people, you commence to offend them and show that you distrust them either through cowardice or lack of confidence, and both of these opinions generate hatred."
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  8. #8
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    It depends on how you are going to ream. An RCBS reaming die? Wilson type tool? Some of the other type case trimmers? Drill press?
    2nd Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. - "A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed."

    "Before you argue with someone, ask yourself, is that person even mentally mature enough to grasp the concept of different perspectives? Because if not, there’s absolutely no point."

    – Amber Veal

  9. #9
    Boolit Grand Master

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    I normally neck turn when needed. On one wild cat I actually do both. I neck rem in a die with the neck supported to clean up then neck turn to size for the fitted neck in the chamber. This gives very accurate neck wall thickness. On this case necks will thicken to around .015 - .017 since the new neck is formed mostly from the shoulder on the original case.

    I ream for clearance and to get a even surface. I neck turn for fitted necks in tight necked chambers. For reaming supported in a die measure the necks ID in the die subtract the this dia frombullet dia and then subtract another .001 - .002 for tension. In this way you die will size and not over work brass

  10. #10
    Boolit Buddy
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    Quote Originally Posted by M-Tecs View Post
    It depends on how you are going to ream. An RCBS reaming die? Wilson type tool? Some of the other type case trimmers? Drill press?
    Learn something new every day. I had never heard of a reaming die. I do have RCBS, Lyman, and Forster case trimmers, and a fine old drill press.

    Thank you, Richard
    Isn't a 9mm just a .45 set on stun? -- Amy W.

    "When you disarm the people, you commence to offend them and show that you distrust them either through cowardice or lack of confidence, and both of these opinions generate hatred."
    -- Niccolo Machiavelli

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  11. #11
    Boolit Buddy
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    Quote Originally Posted by country gent View Post
    I normally neck turn when needed. On one wild cat I actually do both. I neck rem in a die with the neck supported to clean up then neck turn to size for the fitted neck in the chamber. This gives very accurate neck wall thickness. On this case necks will thicken to around .015 - .017 since the new neck is formed mostly from the shoulder on the original case.

    I ream for clearance and to get a even surface. I neck turn for fitted necks in tight necked chambers. For reaming supported in a die measure the necks ID in the die subtract the this dia frombullet dia and then subtract another .001 - .002 for tension. In this way you die will size and not over work brass
    Thank you!

    Richard
    Isn't a 9mm just a .45 set on stun? -- Amy W.

    "When you disarm the people, you commence to offend them and show that you distrust them either through cowardice or lack of confidence, and both of these opinions generate hatred."
    -- Niccolo Machiavelli

    USPSA A32025
    NRA Life

  12. #12
    Boolit Buddy
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    Quote Originally Posted by Preacher Jim View Post
    When pulling down from larger caliber to smaller I ream to remove donut that can form.
    The opposite happens. When you neck up, part of the shoulder brass ends up in the neck. Case in point is the very popular 30BR. You open 6MM brass to 30 caliber, the shoulder is at the bottom of the neck, and is very easy to see with the naked eye.

    I have necked down 6BR cases for 22BR. I never got a doughnut, the neck gets thicker and longer.

  13. #13
    Boolit Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by B R Shooter View Post
    The opposite happens. When you neck up, part of the shoulder brass ends up in the neck. Case in point is the very popular 30BR. You open 6MM brass to 30 caliber, the shoulder is at the bottom of the neck, and is very easy to see with the naked eye.

    I have necked down 6BR cases for 22BR. I never got a doughnut, the neck gets thicker and longer.
    Yup! thats what I have with 348 cases necked up to 45/75 - little donut where the crease of the old shoulder was - not a problem until I load longer boolits (405 grain) then the donut interferes with the boolit .

  14. #14
    Boolit Buddy
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    Quote Originally Posted by indian joe View Post
    Yup! thats what I have with 348 cases necked up to 45/75 - little donut where the crease of the old shoulder was - not a problem until I load longer boolits (405 grain) then the donut interferes with the boolit .
    Me too! I shot thousands of 30BR J's with no issue, and started using the same brass shooting cast. Well I had to seat the heavier cast deeper, and there was the doghnut! Took me a match to realize what was going on. Since I had the doughtnut inside, I used my .3105" chucking reamer and ran that down the fired necks, worked very well.

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