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Thread: What type of Drill do I need?

  1. #21
    Boolit Master

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    Quote Originally Posted by oconeedan View Post
    As a knife maker, I have to drill hardened steel once in a while. I use carbide bits, they are short and expensive. My method, is to peck at it. Drill press only, you will break it if you use a hand drill. Use cutting oil. I drill in short, interrupted pecks, allowing all chips to clear. If you get it hot you are making things more difficult. If you use too much pressure, the bit will break. Carbide bits don't like to bend. A sharp, carbide bit, will get the job done.
    Dan
    What he said^^^^^^
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  2. #22
    Boolit Master brstevns's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EDG View Post
    If this is changing the bolt face drilling is not the way to go. You want to bore the bolt face out with a small carbide boring bar. You can even grind a piece of brazed carbide to bore the shallow recess needed for a bolt face bushing.

    I have never bored one out but I have faced them off to clean up light pitting.
    No lath, so not much of a choice

  3. #23
    Boolit Master brstevns's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by James Wisner View Post
    " It is a neat way to make up a bolt to feed the .223 in a Mauser Action. That Why "

    OK, you did not say WHICH Mauser type of bolt you want to convert.
    A 93, 94, 95 or a Swedish or a M98 ?? big differrence between them all.

    Another option is to buy the back half of the FN bolt bodies that Sarco has,
    They are set up for the M98, nice handle, and third lug, but the front section of the body is oversize at .720 for a reason.
    Then machine a new bolt head and baffle to fit onto the projection the bolt has all ready, attach or pin and there you go.

    You can recut the rear section to work on the 93 - 96, and the thread timing is correct for the Swede sleeves.
    Make a new bolt head and baffle, pin and off you go to the fun part of the conversion, that of making the shaped magazine insert to go into the old trigger guard to feed the 5.56 or 300 BO.

    Yes its doable and I am in the middle of the same type of conversion once the Savage bolt head gets here so I can copy it to make new bolt heads to fit onto the Sarco FN Mauser bolt bodies

    JW
    Working with a 98 SR . Curious do you know what size hole those bolts have drill thru them?

  4. #24
    Boolit Grand Master
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    A am fortunate to have a large set of solid carbide twist drills and that is what I use for hardened steel drilling on my projects......when I cannot soften the item 1st and drill normally and then re-harden.

    CAUTION>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>solid carbide drills are extremely hard.....and break VERY easily! Only use them in a firm, rigid, no-play drill press or milling machine!!!!!

    Good luck with your holes. Mabe check locally for a high quality machine shop or tool & die shop that will do it for you. AND............guarantee their work!!!!!!!

    banger

  5. #25
    Boolit Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by brstevns View Post
    No lath, so not much of a choice
    Then I doubt you have a Mill or heavy duty drill press needed to use a carbide drill without breaking it or with the precision needed to keep it straight.
    NRA High Master XTC
    DR# 2125

  6. #26
    Boolit Master
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    I lightly skimmed through most of the previous replies so pardon me if I offer a suggestion that's already been put forth.

    Back when I was doing some work on my K31 rifle I wanted to drill some holes in the side of the reciever but the metal on the reciever must be made of kryptonite or something cause none of my expensive drill bits would even put a scratch on the surface. (I'm aware it's the bolt you're trying to drill into but it's metal none the less)

    At one point I laid my reciever on my lap as I attempted to get a hole started with what I thought was the hardest drill bit I could buy. The cutting tip seemed to be catching at one point so I pushed down a bit harder only to have the searing hot drill bit slip over the side of the reciever and into my thigh. It went into my thigh about a half-inch before I was able to stop the downward momentum. That drill bit had gotten so hot from just spinning and spinning on the surface of my K31's reciever that when I drilled into my thigh it didn't even bleed. I think it cauterized the hole in my thigh as it was sinking in.

    It took that episode of ignorance on my part before I inquired of some of the other home gunsmiths online about how to go about this. Several of the replies I got were similar to the ones posted here. Some suggested "Spot-Annealing" others suggested stuff that I can no longer remember but the suggestion I eventually used was the one that mentioned a certain type of drill bit called a "Hi-Rock" drill bit.

    I'm not kidding. None of my better drill bits would even scratch the surface of the metal of my reciever. I bought one of the Hi-Rock drill bits in the size I needed and it cut through the hardened metal of my K31 reciveer like a sharp knife through hot butter. Then I had to tap the holes I'd drilled. That brought about another dilemma but, that's where the spot annealing came in. Anyway, if it hasn't already been suggested or if you haven't already tired it, you might look into buying a Hi-Rock drill bit.

    HollowPoint

  7. #27
    Boolit Master brstevns's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HollowPoint View Post
    I lightly skimmed through most of the previous replies so pardon me if I offer a suggestion that's already been put forth.

    Back when I was doing some work on my K31 rifle I wanted to drill some holes in the side of the reciever but the metal on the reciever must be made of kryptonite or something cause none of my expensive drill bits would even put a scratch on the surface. (I'm aware it's the bolt you're trying to drill into but it's metal none the less)

    At one point I laid my reciever on my lap as I attempted to get a hole started with what I thought was the hardest drill bit I could buy. The cutting tip seemed to be catching at one point so I pushed down a bit harder only to have the searing hot drill bit slip over the side of the reciever and into my thigh. It went into my thigh about a half-inch before I was able to stop the downward momentum. That drill bit had gotten so hot from just spinning and spinning on the surface of my K31's reciever that when I drilled into my thigh it didn't even bleed. I think it cauterized the hole in my thigh as it was sinking in.

    It took that episode of ignorance on my part before I inquired of some of the other home gunsmiths online about how to go about this. Several of the replies I got were similar to the ones posted here. Some suggested "Spot-Annealing" others suggested stuff that I can no longer remember but the suggestion I eventually used was the one that mentioned a certain type of drill bit called a "Hi-Rock" drill bit.

    I'm not kidding. None of my better drill bits would even scratch the surface of the metal of my reciever. I bought one of the Hi-Rock drill bits in the size I needed and it cut through the hardened metal of my K31 reciveer like a sharp knife through hot butter. Then I had to tap the holes I'd drilled. That brought about another dilemma but, that's where the spot annealing came in. Anyway, if it hasn't already been suggested or if you haven't already tired it, you might look into buying a Hi-Rock drill bit.

    HollowPoint
    Thanks Will look that up

  8. #28
    Boolit Grand Master


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    I've had luck making a water based drilling fluid with Ballistol
    I am become death. The destroyer of worlds

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  9. #29
    Boolit Master brstevns's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by akajun View Post
    Then I doubt you have a Mill or heavy duty drill press needed to use a carbide drill without breaking it or with the precision needed to keep it straight.
    Sometimes, we must say a prayer and work with what we have.

  10. #30
    Boolit Buddy
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    Carbide bit. High speed. Do-Drill from Brownell's or Tap Magic for cutting fluid. Job is best done in a mill, but a drill press will do in a pinch IF it has no runout in the spindle bearing. Carbide bits don't bend, they break. Good luck.
    NRA Life 1992
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BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
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LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check