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Thread: Junior shooters classes and training

  1. #1
    Boolit Master




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    Junior shooters classes and training

    My son has been approached (maybe the approach went the other way) regarding setting up a junior marksmanship effort at his daughter's Montosori school. He asked me, and I haven't a clue. Anyone here have some guiding lights??? He is thinking about buying 2 rifles and 2 pistols, and letting the kids shoot in relays. I suggested Ruger Mk? automatics, but have no recommendation for the rifles. He mentioned Model 52's , and I nixxed that - too big, too heavy, too expensive, and better than tyro's need. What say??
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  2. #2
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    what is the age range, younger kids probably better with bb guns and clay pidgens, they like to see the target break. I have found when teaching new shooters you are better off with single shot bolt action, less chance for misfires and better control of safety.
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  3. #3
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    Would recommend single shot 22's only, at least in rifle, and most importantly to have multiple eyes on the kids and how they are handling the firearm. A basic demonstration prior to anything is a must, safety, use of the sights, the potential consequences of mis-handling, yada-yada, it has to be covered.

    One of the clubs I belong to had a program, well attended but due to a 'lack of eyes' had to cancel it. It was also mandatory that the parents be present. This wasn't a drop your kids and we'll babysit them scenario.

  4. #4
    Boolit Master




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    Quote Originally Posted by rancher1913 View Post
    what is the age range, younger kids probably better with bb guns and clay pidgens, they like to see the target break. I have found when teaching new shooters you are better off with single shot bolt action, less chance for misfires and better control of safety.
    Elementary and Mid-school age range. The single-shot bolt action makes a lot of sense. I like the idea of clay pigeons for the first-timers. Second semester, maybe targets. Suggestions for single-shot bolt-action rifles?
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    One of the most endearing sights in the world is the vision of a naked good-looking woman leaving the bedroom to make breakfast. Bolivar Shagnasty (I believe that Lazarus Long also said it, but I can't find any record of it.)

  5. #5
    Boolit Master
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    forget the hand guns. get 4 single shot rifles. easier to watch for safety no way for a live round to get lost in the action.

    get cheap rifles. they are going to get dropped and bumped. if they advance and show an interest and ability get one or two better rifles.

  6. #6
    Boolit Master




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    And I assume that kids would have to be of a certain age before putting a handgun in their hands...
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    One of the most endearing sights in the world is the vision of a naked good-looking woman leaving the bedroom to make breakfast. Bolivar Shagnasty (I believe that Lazarus Long also said it, but I can't find any record of it.)

  7. #7
    Boolit Bub
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    I agree that handguns are probably a recipe for trouble. Semi-auto rifles as well.

    Get several Cricket rifles or something similar to start. Keep close eye on everyone and keep track of all the ammo.

    Make sure whoever is running the show is a certified instructor. Get lots of insurance. Make the parents participate. Consult Lawyers. Make everyone sign lots of wavers.

    Actually, there are so many ways for this to go sideways, I recommend just politely declining...

  8. #8
    Boolit Grand Master

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    At our club the juniors started out in the classroom for 2-3 sessions learning about sight picture, trigger control, position, and most of all safety. Ten thy moved up to pellet rifles of a makeshift bench, once they shot a certain score they then moved up to 22s. This was all with rifles and Iron sights. As has been stated you idealy want 1 coach with every shooter to talk them thru the shot and keep them under control.
    I believe the cmp / dcm may still offer assistance to clubs schools offer these programs in the form of rifles and ammo.

    As to rifles the lighter Winchester Remington mossberg target rifles will do fine. We started them out withthe rifles prone and sling then when they reached a certain score sitting with sling and kneeling with sling, Last as offhand.

    You dont needd the very best in equipment or ammo here or this since postion, sight picture, trigger control, and breathing will be more

  9. #9
    Boolit Master
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    Air guns are the way to set up within a school. There are established 10 meter competition programs and air rifles designed for the purpose. Also established training materials. They learn the fundamentals of marksmanship and safety procedures that last a life time. Manufactures provide (good, youth scaled) equipment at a dramatic discount as well

    https://www.usashooting.org/membersh...ams/youthrifle

    Another option is to look into SSSF programs. They cover SCTP (clay shooting, trap, skeet sporting clays) and SASP (action pistol). Starts them in 4th grade thru college.https://sssfonline.org/

    I will look up the air gun info as well. I can personally attest to SCTP, been deeply involved since 2003. I strongly suggest you not “reinvent the wheel”, these programs are well established and evolved to provide the best experience. I was headed into the air gun program until the SCTP got started. AZ already has a strong SCTP program at the state level, suspect they can help with pistol as well.


    Another thought, the above referenced programs are the feeder programs for the US Olympic team. You will find most of the folk headed to 2020 games to be very familiar with these programs. Demonstration of solid basic instruction with a known path to the top.
    Last edited by rking22; 02-21-2020 at 08:40 PM.
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  10. #10
    Boolit Buddy


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    The sights on the Crickett rifles are hard to adjust otherwise a good choice. I think the best budget youth rifle out there is the Savage Rascal. The Henry youth rifle is a good rifle but doesn't have as good a set of sights. We got Rascals for the youth program at our club to replace some very worn out Remingtons. The Rascal is also available in a left handed version. Look around for a local Appleseed trained instructor to help you set up the program. My wife and I both went through the Appleseed instructor training and then helped with the youth program.
    Also you might check with the NRA. They have a program for youth shooting. If you are an NRA instructor they can help you with insurance.
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  11. #11
    Boolit Master

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    Quote Originally Posted by kerplode View Post
    I agree that handguns are probably a recipe for trouble. Semi-auto rifles as well.

    Get several Cricket rifles or something similar to start. Keep close eye on everyone and keep track of all the ammo.

    Make sure whoever is running the show is a certified instructor. Get lots of insurance. Make the parents participate. Consult Lawyers. Make everyone sign lots of wavers.

    Actually, there are so many ways for this to go sideways, I recommend just politely declining...
    if everybody were to follow your advice of just declining, were would the future of shooting be.
    if you are ever being chased by a taxidermist, don't play dead

  12. #12
    Boolit Buddy
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    Echo,

    Recommend he contact the CMP. They have been supporting junior shooting programs for a long time and have a lot of insight. The CMP has an online course that JROTC instructors have to take prior to being certified as coaches. The course may be available to non-JROTC instructors and would probably go a long way in giving him ideas about starting and maintaining a junior shooting program. It is easy to create a CMP affiliated club that will entitle club members to purchase equipment from the CMP.

    Air guns are the way to go. The logistics are a whole lot easier than with cartridge rifles. If the school has bought into the junior shooting program they will probably find a place on campus for him to set up before or after school. The CMP has some pretty good deals on air guns, pellets, targets and other equipment.

    No need to reinvent the wheel.

    Gus Youmans

  13. #13
    Boolit Bub
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    Quote Originally Posted by rancher1913 View Post
    if everybody were to follow your advice of just declining, were would the future of shooting be.
    Same place it’s gonna be anyway, I reckon, but with less chance of me getting sued or ending up on the news.

    Seems like the air rifle / CMP route is probably the best bet. Make sure you’re insured...

  14. #14
    Boolit Buddy

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    SAFETY SAFETY SAFETY is top priority!

    Lots of good advise given above.

    I've been involved with junior shooting for 30 years. Minimum age for our club is 12 years old. We found that any younger, they don't understand range commands, and can't comprehend the basics.

    We lay down the law; violation of Safety rules, disrespect, profanity, drugs, theft, destruction of property will NOT be tolerated, and you're out the door. Parents get the same lecture as the kids, so there is no misunderstanding. Period! We start every shooting session with the Pledge to our Flag. We stress the understanding of the 2nd Amendment.

    Get involved with the CMP & NRA. They both have lots of info and will be very helpful.

    A good little rifle to start with is the Savage single shot, comes with peep sights (can't remember the model) We got a deal on them through the CMP. They are light weight and small kids can handle them. Forget anything heavier. For the older kids who are more advanced, we have Anschutz youth models, and they work out very well. We got them through an NRA grant from Champion's Choice. Forget Model 52's and 40X's, they are way too heavy & clumsy for kids. We have some, and they never get used.

    Consult a lawyer for advise. Get insurance coverage. Get training.

    There's a lot to getting involved with junior shooting, a lot of responsibility, and I still enjoy it. It's the only way to keep our sport going. Seeing the expression on a kid's face when they bring back a good target makes it all worth while.

  15. #15
    Boolit Master




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    Quote Originally Posted by Alstep View Post
    SAFETY SAFETY SAFETY is top priority!

    Seeing the expression on a kid's face when they bring back a good target makes it all worth while.
    The main payoff for me, when I was proffing @ Pima Community College, was to see that figurative Light go off over some student's head. Made the day...
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    One of the most endearing sights in the world is the vision of a naked good-looking woman leaving the bedroom to make breakfast. Bolivar Shagnasty (I believe that Lazarus Long also said it, but I can't find any record of it.)

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