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Thread: Slower powders in shorter barrels ??

  1. #1
    Boolit Buddy
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    Slower powders in shorter barrels ??

    I have a new 20" 7mm08 on the way,and will either be loading H4350,or IMR4064 ,and Hornady 139gr Interlocks,or 145gr Hot Cors .I have used both,and have gotten good accuracy from both with my other 7mm08 rifles, I don't own a chronograph,so I can't speak of velocity,but I have encountered flattened primers when approaching max with the 4064,and never showed any pressure signs even with a compressed load of H4350 .I realize there is a good bit of difference in burn rates of these two powders,and have hears some folks state that a short barrel will give incomplete burn with slower powders,and I have heard some say that is nonsense ,so I would appreciate the opinions that any of you care to offer...Thanks

  2. #2
    Boolit Buddy chutesnreloads's Avatar
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    Is there some reason you're restricted to just those two powders?Use whatever powder gives best accuracy,
    Only reason I'd worry about incomplete burn is if shooting over very dry grass/leaves and possibly starting a fire

  3. #3
    Boolit Buddy
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    Quote Originally Posted by chutesnreloads View Post
    Is there some reason you're restricted to just those two powders?Use whatever powder gives best accuracy,
    Only reason I'd worry about incomplete burn is if shooting over very dry grass/leaves and possibly starting a fire
    No,I have tried other powders such as H414,and IMR 4166,but not had much luck with either.I am a creature of habit,and always have a good stock of what I consider the most versatile powders IMR 4064,IMR,as well as H4350,and 4895.I have been hoping to find the StaBALL 6.5 to try ,but have not seen it yet.I am not really worried about it,but just bored,and curious .

  4. #4
    Boolit Grand Master

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    One crude test is to spread a bed sheet under and in front of the rifle and shoot a few rounds look for unburnt powder laying there on it.

    With the moderate charge of powder and bullet weight of the 7 08. I dont think you'll be losing a lot. Powder burn is a factor if several things, Pressure, some powders just dont burn as well until they get to a certain pressure level. Bullet weight heavier promotes a cleaner burn. Actual charge rate or weight a small charge like for 223 burns in a much shorter length off the barrel than say a charge for a 300 win mag

  5. #5
    Boolit Buddy chutesnreloads's Avatar
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    I'd certainly be giving that 4895 a try also,,, It's a very versatile powder

  6. #6
    Boolit Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by country gent View Post
    One crude test is to spread a bed sheet under and in front of the rifle and shoot a few rounds look for unburnt powder laying there on it.
    I've seen this same thing said about muzzleloaders too. You know what I find? Powder. It doesn't matter if I'm shooting 100 grains in the 28" barrel rifle, or the 10" barrel pistol.

    You don't have to look farther than the encore pistols to know not to worry. One of the most accurate loads I saw in a 7-08 encore pistol (15" barrel), was a 140 grain bullet with a hefty charge of Varget. For that reason, I would definitely give 4064 a try. Even in my recent purchase of a contender with 309 JDJ (14" barrel). One load I was using for fireforming was a 125 grain bullet with 54 grains 4350. It shot very well too.

    I could go on and on about shorter handguns too. Don't worry about a powders burn rate with relation to your barrel length. The fastest load will always be the fastest no matter the barrel length. If a powder isn't burning by a couple inches of barrel, it never will be. Just choose a powder, and see what shoots best.

  7. #7
    Boolit Buddy
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    Thanks guys,I appreciate,and try to absorb all advice.

  8. #8
    Boolit Grand Master






    Lloyd Smale's Avatar
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    for the most part in a given cartridge barrel length really doesn't play much of a role in which powder works best. Take something like an o6 that does real well with 4350. It will do well with 4350 whether the barrel is 16 in or 26 inch.
    Soldier of God, sixgun junky, Retired electrical lineman. My office was a 100 feet in the air, closer to God the better

  9. #9
    Boolit Master
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    +1 Lloyd Smale Been many tests over the years - results - mostly the powders that give the most velocity in 24"-26" barrels give the highest velocities in the shorter barrels. Accuracy is what bullet and velocity makes you/your rifle happy.

  10. #10
    Boolit Grand Master 303Guy's Avatar
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    I have a 14.6 inch barrel Lee Enfield. I use H4350 in it and there is no unburned powder. In fact, a full case of 44gr under a 194gr patched boolit does 2020fps at the muzzle. 40gr also burns clean.

    On the other hand, I have tried BLC-2 in a long barrel and it burns outside the muzzle when it hits air. One rifle fitted with a simple suppressor with H4350 has almost no recoil. With BLC-2 the scope hits my face! The powder burns in the suppressor making it act like a rocket motor. There is no difference in recoil with an un-scoped rifle - both powders kick hard. BLC-2 will be a lower oxygen formula, burning rich giving a longer and lower pressure curve and having partially burned fuel to burn at the muzzle.
    Last edited by 303Guy; 02-28-2020 at 03:28 PM.
    Rest In Peace My Son (01/06/1986 - 14/01/2014)

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  11. #11
    Boolit Master


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    4064 or IMR 4350 are my favorite powders in the 7mm-08 for bullets in the 139-140 range. Varget, while matching the velocity of 4064, has never quite given the accuracy of the 4064. It is difficult to get enough 4350, at least the IMR version, to reach pressure signs with bullets in the 140 grain range. I haven't used IMR4895 in the 7mm-08 that I recall but a friend did a couple of years ago with stellar results.
    I wouldn't worry about burn rate as much as watching the chronograph for velocity and the target for accuracy. It has been several years since I have chronographed loads for any of my 7mm-08 rifles but as I recall my velocities fell in the mid-2,800fps range with 140 weight bullets. If accuracy had fallen in the mid-2,700 fps range I'm sure the loads would have been just as effective and the deer wouldn't have known the difference.
    Good luck,
    Rick

  12. #12
    Boolit Master roverboy's Avatar
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    I've handloaded since '87 and the only times I've ever noticed powder not burning good was when using Thunderbird 5070 in .30-06 with 180 gr. bullet. I used a CCI250 Magnum primers too.
    Mrs. Hogwallop up and R-U-N-N-O-F-T.

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BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
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GC Gas Check