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Thread: reloading 410 slug question/problem

  1. #1
    Boolit Bub
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    May 2009
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    reloading 410 slug question/problem

    Any ideas? I loaded some 410 slugs by: used Speer .323 8mm 150 gr jsp bullets because they fit in the wad seemingly perfect. Used 16 gr H110 powder. I originally wanted to use 357 dia bullets but found they were too big dia for the wad. The 8mm bullets set in the cup of the wad just snug and when pushed in the shell it was just enough pressure that the bullet could not be shaken out. I thought it was perfect, no criimp, open front. I knew the powder charge was for 4 double ought buckshot, weighing about 212 grs, heavier than my bullet, but then the firing. first bullet, at ten feet into a 1x4 board, hit perfectly sideways, dented about 3/16". bounced back about 3 feet. second shot hit straight, stuck in the board about 1/2". Guessing it was shooting about 400-500fps. Did the lack of crimp make that kind of difference or was the powder charge that low?

  2. #2
    Boolit Master

    rancher1913's Avatar
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    crimp makes a big deference, most recipes will specify which style crimp needs to be used. loading for shotguns is not like loading metallic, a seemingly innocent change can result in a catastifie
    if you are ever being chased by a taxidermist, don't play dead

  3. #3
    Boolit Master
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    I wonder if it might help to try a different powder H110 needs some resistance to burn like it should . But I have no experience loading 410 slugs.

  4. #4
    Boolit Mold
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    Mar 2016
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    I've loaded .410 slugs using a various powder charges from light plinking loads to scary-high velocity loads. Pistol powders for light loads: .429 X 240gr cast bullet over 16grs. of Winchester 630 = 1240fps. ' got this load from Lyman Cast Bullet manual. I shorten the shell case to +/-2.25 inches and seat the bullet to a max case length of 2.57"; no wad, but very small piece or non-compressed dacron fiber (pillow stuffin') on top of the powder. My test gun is a Mossberg Mod.500. Warning: Measure the barrel diameter before you select a bullet diameter! Check for a squib load after each shot!

  5. #5
    Boolit Grand Master


    Larry Gibson's Avatar
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    What are you shooting them out of?
    Larry Gibson

    “Deficient observation is merely a form of ignorance and responsible for the many morbid notions and foolish ideas prevailing.”
    ― Nikola Tesla

  6. #6
    Boolit Buddy gunarea's Avatar
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    Hey wallacem

    I have done a lot of load development for 410 slug use. Long projectiles do poorly in non rifled barrels. Expecting more than what is reasonable is a mistake. Lee 9mm, 124gr rn cast does as well as round balls and has a little more whump. Hercules 2400 was the hands down best propellant when dialed in to a specific shotgun. My work used four different shotguns; Savage 22/410, Mossberg 500, H&R single shot and a Remington 1100(wouldn't cycle, turned into a single shot). Every one of them did best with a different powder charge. The Savage had sights so it was used to compare accuracy. Claybuster wads were used throughout. Best velocity and accuracy came from adding punched out wads, both above powder and projectile. Best paper wads for over powder, were cardboard box. They also helped gain height in 2 1/2" shells. Best paper wads for over shot, were cereal and detergent boxes. As I recall, two cardboard wads over powder, then a claybuster wad with the petals cut to accommodate the slug. Three or maybe four of the thinner but harder, paper box wads. When the combination is correct, the finished crimp is perfect. Well crimped shells performed the very best. The two boys for whom this work was done, 8yrs and 9yrs old, became very successful turkey hunters in short order. It took Dad and granpa a lot longer to develop the loads than it took the boys to get real good. Velocities with accuracy were getting up around 1200 fps when the chronograph took a hit. I remember we loaded a few steps higher before settling on a recoil factor that was tolerable. This was eighteen years ago! I hope this is helpful. Tell us how yours works out.
    Shoot often, Shoot well.

  7. #7
    Boolit Buddy
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    Gunarea what accuracy ?????????

  8. #8
    Boolit Buddy gunarea's Avatar
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    Hey turtlezx

    Me and Tim, could keep five of five inside 4" @ 100' with velocity over 1200fps. Several propellants were involved in our workup and some were crossed off due to sound of report on young ears. I do not remember the exact charge of 2400, but we started with a safe load for 5/8 ounce of shot. My Remington showed the least promising accuracy, no matter what choke we put in it. Although tumbling was apparent, it took more than 75 yds to move it off the paper. That being said, both boys preferred shooting the single barrel H&R which had nothing but a front bead. Being little guys, they handled the light weight easier but the kick was more noticeable. I suppose I could reflect on a bunch of the failures, which were many, but you now have the winning recipe. They both were better shooting instinctively than either of us were, using the sighted Savage. Of the dozen or so turkeys they shot with this combo, by the third year, only head shots were made. Both of the boys are now over six foot tall and don't worry about recoil. I hope they let me enjoy doing this again, when I'm great.
    Granpa
    Shoot often, Shoot well.

  9. #9
    Boolit Buddy
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    I’ve gotten better performance from the .410 using buckshot loads. 3- .375” over a .350” in a shot cup. Using H110 powder. My Savage .22/.410 will usually put one hit at POA/POI at 25-40yds. A second slightly lower and remaining two side by side 4-6” apart and 6-8” low.
    Have only taken one rampaging Armadillo... but it worked really, really well! About 15yds.

    I’ve also used a single .375” ball over a shot cup filled with instant grits and hand crimped.
    Also loaded a few with a .400” 180gr cast RFN that a I shot through a H&R Snake Charmer. It would hit where you generally pointed it... cut a round hole, too. 20-30 feet.

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Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check