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Thread: Powder Measure for H4895

  1. #1
    Boolit Buddy
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    Powder Measure for H4895

    What powder measure is most likely to give consistent charges of H4895?

    I know its an extruded powder and a ball powder would be more consistent, but my question stands.

    I have available:

    Dillon powder measure
    Lyman #55
    RCBS Uniflow
    Herters powder measure
    Lee Perfect Powder Measure

    Thanks,
    Josh

    If a similar post shows up, this is my fourth attempt to post this...

  2. #2
    Boolit Buddy
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    Quote Originally Posted by 0802 View Post
    What powder measure is most likely to give consistent charges of H4895?

    I know its an extruded powder and a ball powder would be more consistent, but my question stands.

    I have available:

    Dillon powder measure
    Lyman #55
    RCBS Uniflow
    Herters powder measure
    Lee Perfect Powder Measure

    Thanks,
    Josh

    If a similar post shows up, this is my fourth attempt to post this...
    What charge size are you throwing ... it makes a difference if it is 223 / 308 /3006 / or larger
    Rcbs and Hornady have 2 drums sizes

    and it makes a difference if you have a baffle
    and the size of the baffle

  3. #3
    Boolit Buddy
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    42.0, no added baffles.

  4. #4
    Boolit Buddy
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    0802,

    When I was shooting a lot of high power rifle competition (3000-5000 rounds a year) I used the RCBS Uniflow powder measure for both .308 and .223 with mostly extruded powders, including H4895, Accurate 2495, VV N140, VV N150, and Reloader 15. The loads were capable of shooting clean scores with high X counts at 200 and 300 yards. For reference, the X ring is one MOA and the ten ring is two MOA. I weighed charges for 600 yards and longer because those loads were maximum and I did not want to risk an over charge. I have a friend who is a better shot than I who weighed all his charges for 200, 300, and 600 yards and he did not get fliers. He used a Hornady powder measure on a Hornady Lock-N-Load progressive. My RCBS was adapted to a Dillon 550 with the RCBS case activated linkage system.

    The bottom line is that any difference in accuracy from weighed to measured was lost in all the other shooter induced errors.

    Gus Youmans

  5. #5
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    barrabruce's Avatar
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    Simple dipper and trickle it up.
    Pretty quick.

    Unless you are one of these people that like to do a 50 round block in 1 minute with a thrower.

    I always thought a thrower and one of those auto tricklers would be quick as you could seat a bullet while the other charge is weighing.

    The big logs getting cut always bothered me.

    But the benchresters still like the Harrell for it’s easy tune and close tolerances.

    The only thrower I have used is a rbs one that’s over 35 years young and seams rough enough.

    Just have to mount it so the shaking and knocking between rounds is consistent.

    A baffle helps a lot.
    Last edited by barrabruce; 02-10-2020 at 03:46 PM.

  6. #6
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    Kraschenbirn's Avatar
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    While I no longer compete, I still burn an awful lot of H4895 - .308, 30-06, 8x57, .303 Brit, etc. - and, in the past, have used both the Dillon and the Lyman 55 with varying degrees of success. In Post #3 you state 'no added baffles' so, whichever measure you choose, that's where you need to start. As the as powder level in the reservoir drops, the decreasing weight of the remaining powder will cause any measure to throw on the light side. Adding a baffle in the reservoir, along with keeping it more than half-full, will help minimize that. Beyond that, there's not much that can be done for the Lyman but the Dillon can be further improved by using a fixed-cavity charge bar but you'll have to make your own. (I made mine from aluminum bar stock, drilling the initial cavity well undersize and reaming it gradually until it dropped precisely the charge I wanted.)

    Just FYI, I still use the modified Dillon if I'm running up a batch of 'plinker' ammo for one of my milsurps but for serious accuracy, I use an old Belding & Mull and weigh every charge.

    Bill
    "I'm not often right but I've never been wrong."

    Jimmy Buffett
    "Scarlet Begonias"

  7. #7
    Boolit Grand Master
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    I cast my vote for ... Herters powder measure. Mine is mounted permanently on the bench
    Regards
    John

  8. #8
    Boolit Master


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    I would think the one that has the smallest cross section where the measured powder is separated from the resevoir. I am not familiar with all the powder measures listed. I would try the small drumi n the RCBS to see what it would do.
    Of course you could throw your charge and trickle up on your scale.
    For match loads I use a Chargemaster. It does slow the process down as it takes about 45 seconds to weight the charge and seat a bullet..

  9. #9
    Boolit Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by 0802 View Post
    I have ....
    Dillon powder measure
    Lyman #55
    RCBS Uniflow
    Herters powder measure
    Lee Perfect Powder Measure
    You have all those good powder measures and you're asking us to tell you which one you'll like best for 4895?

    You have them, why not test them yourself and tell us which one YOU believe works best?

  10. #10
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    ShooterAZ's Avatar
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    I set my RCBS Uniflow to throw very slightly light, and then trickle up the rest. Done it like that forever. In the real world the amount of variation probably doesn't make much of a difference, but I try to keep things as consistent as possible.

  11. #11
    Boolit Master



    Kevin Rohrer's Avatar
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    Whichever one does not cut powder granules. I know the Quick-Measure does not. Maybe the Lyman 55?
    Member: Orange Gunsite Family, NRA-Life, Varmint Hunter's Assn, ARTCA, American Legion, & the West Branch Gun Club.

    Caveat Emptor: Do not trust Cavery Grips/American Gripz from Clayton, NC. He will rip you off.

  12. #12
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    Lyman #55 ...the secrete is to adjust the brass slides to form one narrow deep powder cavity...
    Yes it takes a bit of adjustment and fiddling with the slides to form that narrow deep cavity but when you do that fewer "sticks" are sheared .
    Consistent measure handle operation is also a must for consistent loads .
    I've used a #55 and both H4895 and IMR4895 to load a 30-06 Springfield 1903-A3 rifle since the 1960's . Use the above tips and consistent accurate charges will result.
    Gary
    Certified Cajun
    Proud Member of The Basket of Deplorables

  13. #13
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    Larry Gibson's Avatar
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    I have 4 of the 5 powder measures mentioned (don't have the Herter). I find the Lyman #55 consistently throws the most uniform charges of not only H4895 but also many other powders.
    Larry Gibson

    “Deficient observation is merely a form of ignorance and responsible for the many morbid notions and foolish ideas prevailing.”
    ― Nikola Tesla

  14. #14
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    Pressman's Avatar
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    Belding & Mull or Lyman 55
    Antique Reloading Tool Collector, Historian and Writer
    Newsletter editor: Antique Reloading Tool Collectors Association
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    email: pressman@antiquereloadingtools.com
    www.antiquereloadingtools.com

  15. #15
    Boolit Master poppy42's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Rohrer View Post
    Whichever one does not cut powder granules. I know the Quick-Measure does not. Maybe the Lyman 55?
    So dose the unflow. I trickle all rifle loads when using extruded powder.
    Long, Wide, Deep, and Without Hesitation!

  16. #16
    Boolit Master
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    My personal “cross to bear” is IMR4759, but I find that all of the stick powders tend to be challenging to meter. I personally like the old Ideal #5 with factory micrometer (one deep measuring chamber) but find that the major key is to useless slow and deliberate movements of the lever... consistently each time. If you get in a hurry on some throws, you will get less consistent drops and more cut or crushed grains. This is my personal experience, so of course YMMV!

    Froggie
    "It aint easy being green!"

  17. #17
    Boolit Master 44magLeo's Avatar
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    My vote goes for either the Lyman 55 or the Lee PPM. I have both, 3 of the 55's. The Lee has a rubber grommet thing built in so as the measuring chamber closes it won't cut the powder. I find it very accurate.
    The 55's can handle larger volumes of powder. It's first version was designed to throw large charges of black powder. They still make a version with an alloy hopper and long alloy drop tube for black powder.
    The three slide design allows you very precise adjustments.
    Leo

  18. #18
    Boolit Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by poppy42 View Post
    So dose the unflow. I trickle all rifle loads when using extruded powder.
    Me to , I like extruded powder but if am am going to load high volume I use another type powder.

  19. #19
    Boolit Master
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    I've used that powder, actually IMR 4895, in the RCBS, Lyman, and Lee.

    It's not even a competition between those three, the Lee wins hands down. It does not cut kernels, it runs very smooth through that measure. The other two are crunch boxes. Even if they are accurate, it's annoying as heck. The best I remember, my Lee holds about plus or minus .2 grains.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Boy View Post
    I cast my vote for ... Herters powder measure. Mine is mounted permanently on the bench
    I was wondering if anyone would chime in with this answer. I have one my Dad bought in the 60's, I've kept it clean and it is smooooth.
    Dan

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