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Thread: 10/22 trigger- DIY route experiences

  1. #1
    Boolit Buddy
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    10/22 trigger- DIY route experiences

    So the thread on aftermarket triggers was interesting. It introduced me to brimstone gunsmithing and basically sold me one having them upgrade my trigger instead of buying a bx 25 drop in new trigger. But I was looking at some of their videos and they include this
    https://youtu.be/OPJVUefaSmY

    Which is a really nice walk through of what can go wrong and what a basic "moving from terrible to decent" trigger would look like. It actually got me thinking about trying to polish up the working parts myself. And if that fails getting the bx-25 replacement. I try hard not to be a trigger snob and work on upgrading myself rather than the rifle but it's a heavy trigger for such a light gun. Really is.

    I was interested in hearing from more experienced guys. In the video he used fine grit sandpaper to do his polishing. Other videos I've seen using stones or file sets. Bar none this is the best video on the process I've seen. If you guys have a better resource showing the process I'd love to see it. Any and all experience would be welcome. This is a bit down the pipeline of my "to do" list but I thought it might be a comparatively low risk way to gain some skill.
    "There are no solutions there are only tradeoffs" ~ Thomas Sowell

  2. #2
    Boolit Buddy
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    Quote Originally Posted by PerpetualStudent View Post
    So the thread on aftermarket triggers was interesting. It introduced me to brimstone gunsmithing and basically sold me one having them upgrade my trigger instead of buying a bx 25 drop in new trigger. But I was looking at some of their videos and they include this
    https://youtu.be/OPJVUefaSmY

    Which is a really nice walk through of what can go wrong and what a basic "moving from terrible to decent" trigger would look like. It actually got me thinking about trying to polish up the working parts myself. And if that fails getting the bx-25 replacement. I try hard not to be a trigger snob and work on upgrading myself rather than the rifle but it's a heavy trigger for such a light gun. Really is.

    I was interested in hearing from more experienced guys. In the video he used fine grit sandpaper to do his polishing. Other videos I've seen using stones or file sets. Bar none this is the best video on the process I've seen. If you guys have a better resource showing the process I'd love to see it. Any and all experience would be welcome. This is a bit down the pipeline of my "to do" list but I thought it might be a comparatively low risk way to gain some skill.
    I 'stoned' my 10/22 triggers ages ago. I used sharpening stones that I use for knives and I only used my finest stones. The lowest I used was a diamond 1200grit. Personally I would not use sandpaper, I'd be uncomfortable doing it that way. I liked using the stones because they are flat. (I use the stones that do not have to be re-flattened).

    If you want more information on your trigger job, head over to rimfire central. They have a whole sub forum on the 10/22 and tons of info on trigger jobs. Mine came out really nice. I'm glad I did not use anything more rough than 1200. My trigger came out around 2.5 to 3.5 lbs. Which is as light as I wanted it. I could have gone more, but I was only looking for this weight range.

    I went with my own trigger job because back, 5-7 years ago there was a gunsmith who was selling OEM trigger groups that he setup for something like $65 bucks or you could send him your trigger and he would do it for $45. So I took the $20 gamble and it turned out very nice. (i might be off on prices)

  3. #3
    Boolit Master


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    I did one over a decade ago. Not bad but not great. Used stones.

    I had the same approach. If I buggered it up, I would buy an new trigger. BTW, not everyone raves about the BX. Not every cheap modification should expected to work perfectly as there are manufacturing tolerances, plus some people expect a target trigger for $50. There is a reason some trigger groups are $200.

    Go for it!! You will make it better if you take your time. The risk is low and the improvement noticeable.
    Don Verna

    NRA Endowment Member

  4. #4
    Boolit Master
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    im lazy used a power custom hammer in mine used the std springs now have a 2.5 lb trigger.much better than the original 7plus lbs.hornaday dry lube keeps it running well without gumming up so quickly with normal lube.

  5. #5
    Boolit Master
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    Absolutely go for it! You will learn a lot in the process and that is a big reason most of us are on this forum. Use a flat stone or glue the 800 or finer paper to something flat to start. You still want to finish with a very fine and flat stone. You will change the sear angle slightly, they “hook” that’s why they are so heavy. Do not remove all the hook at first, reduce it and then shoot it a while, may be good enough. I have done all mine, think there are 5 only them around here. Not an aftermarket part in any of my triggers and they are safe with weights between 2.25 and 3.5 on my charger. That’s as light as I want, they are smooth, what’s important to me. I do not put in it stops, never liked them on target rifles either. If you screw it up, fav trigger parts are in most people’s junk drawers, and are dirt cheap. Get another and learn some more. When you have had all the fun you want but not the trigger you want, there are drop in sear/trigger sets for sale lots less than a bx. Have fun with them, they can be made to shoot very well using the stickies from RFC using stock parts. -.092 off the breech and shoulder gets you a chamber that functions as well as a bentz and the Ruger barrels are quality, except the huge chambers. After the trigger check the headspace and adjust accordingly, it reduced fliers from decent milk carton federals. The Walnut Sporter stock makes up into a nice squirrel rifle with a pillar bedded setup and trigger work. Strip off the finish and truoil to a nice subdued finish.... like I said they’re fun to piddle with
    “You don’t practice until you get it right. You practice until you can’t get it wrong.” Jason Elam, All-Pro kicker, Denver Broncos

  6. #6
    Boolit Buddy
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    I use to work on S&W revolvers with good luck but I got lazy on my 10/22 an order a KIDD assembly . I would give it a try if I were you, ruin it so what they make new ones. GOOD LUCK

  7. #7
    Boolit Master

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    I bought a 10-22 for a loaner rifle, took it out to the range one nice afternoon to sight it in. The trigger sucked. Gritty, like dragging the trigger over three bumps to fire.

    Was shooting prone, and had a nice comfy matt on top a piece of plush carpet laying on the ground, nice shade.

    Pulled out the tool box and took it apart. After getting the trigger group apart, the sear was rough, wasn't going to use a file and had no stone.

    Well heck, the ground was covered with crushed gravel. So a little time spent selecting, I chose one, shaped nicely for the job, and started rubbing.

    Put the rifle back together, the trigger was much better. Got her sighted in. Took about an hour from first shots to shooting again.

    Wasn't the first time I had a 10-22 trigger group apart.

    That's not the best trigger job ever, but a great improvement over what it was.

    Truth be told, I much prefer the Kidd trigger on another 10-22 lurking round here.
    Last edited by clodhopper; 02-04-2020 at 01:16 AM.
    To lazy to chase arrows.
    Clodhopper

  8. #8
    Boolit Master


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    For the cost, the Kidd trigger should be a bit better than rubbing on the stock components with a piece of gravel. I cannot bring myself to spend that kind of money on a .22 plinker.

    To the OP, if you do not have stones, the suggestion above to use fine grit paper on a flat surface will work and at a minimal cost. I added a trigger stop to mine for next to nothing as I had a tap and set screws in my stuff and I prefer the feel but it is personal preference.

    Let us know how you make out and good luck.
    Don Verna

    NRA Endowment Member

  9. #9
    Boolit Buddy
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    For sharpening knives and tools I have some stones. The finest is a 1000 grit arkansas stone. I'm thinking I might pick up a little finer grit sandpaper and use that on the stone instead. Although I'm sure the arkansas stone is nicer than a piece of gravel.

    I appreciate the encouragement and advice. I can't imagine putting a trigger that's worth more than a gun so no kidd trigger for me. I'll officially add it to my to do list, and (eventually) let you guys know how it goes. Just need to get some punches and very fine grit sandpaper.
    "There are no solutions there are only tradeoffs" ~ Thomas Sowell

  10. #10
    Boolit Buddy
    C-dubb's Avatar
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    I've owned about every trigger and kit made for the 10-22. It all depends on what you want. If this gun is a tin can shooter, do it yourself and you will be happy. If it is a short range squirrel gun, the BX 25 will work great. But if you are building a tack driver to shoot aspirins at 100 yards, the Kidd trigger is the only way to go.

  11. #11
    Boolit Master
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    perpetualstudent, get you a slave pin as well, will reduce the cussin! I use a correct size dowel pin, but I have a very large parts bin to look thru.
    “You don’t practice until you get it right. You practice until you can’t get it wrong.” Jason Elam, All-Pro kicker, Denver Broncos

  12. #12
    Boolit Master
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    gunsmither safety tool makes dismantling and assembly much easier .

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