MidSouth Shooters SupplyRepackboxRotoMetals2Titan Reloading
WidenersADvertise hereInline FabricationLee Precision

Results 1 to 20 of 20

Thread: Source for thread chasers?

  1. #1
    Moderator

    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    The Pacific NorthWet
    Posts
    2,466

    Source for thread chasers?

    Hi all.

    I need a set of SAE thread chasers, cheap is preferred; 1/4-20" and smaller. (I have a storage rack and am bolting "J-hooks" onto it, but need to shorten the bolts and clean up the threads so the bolts aren't over length.) In setting up to move I cannot get at the tap and die set - Oops.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    OKC , Oklahoma
    Posts
    1,561
    This may be to shade tree for you , but I just run a nut on them before cutting then clean up the cut with a file , cut off wheel or belt sander then back the nut off works fine for me 99.9% of the time.

  3. #3
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Hudson Valley NY
    Posts
    933
    Quote Originally Posted by onelight View Post
    This may be to shade tree for you , but I just run a nut on them before cutting then clean up the cut with a file , cut off wheel or belt sander then back the nut off works fine for me 99.9% of the time.
    This is what I usually do too. Over the years I've accumulated many taps & dies though. If you want a cheap set of SAE taps & dies check out Harbor Freight. I don't like their stuff but many people use them, I'd trust the dies over the taps. https://www.harborfreight.com/Carbon...-Pc-62831.html

  4. #4
    Boolit Buddy
    DHDeal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    302
    You can try McMaster Carr for all stuff nuts, bolts, taps, and dies. They ship super fast too.

  5. #5
    Boolit Master


    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    North central Ohio
    Posts
    1,006
    Small Tools Inc. located in Euclid, OH. I've found taps and dies from 0-80 to over an inch, they have metric as well some Whitworth and BSF. New and used. Call them and tell them what your looking for. The owner is Bill, he or his wife will answer the phone
    Before you embark on a journey of revenge, dig two graves.

    ― Confucius

  6. #6

  7. #7
    Boolit Grand Master

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    England,Ar
    Posts
    5,963
    Many of the lesser expensive electrical crimping tools have thread chasers on them. Most I have seen are machine screw sizes like #'s 6,8,10 and 12. You screw the screw into it, cut it off and back it out.

  8. #8
    Moderator

    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    The Pacific NorthWet
    Posts
    2,466
    A nut would do it for me for this probably, the plan is to cut the bolts shorter then thread lock the acorn nuts on (otherwise my hands get cut up a lot when reaching past these; I'd been using nylon wire ties but the J hooks are heavily loaded at times so they were stretching / breaking too often.)

    So a nut would clean the threads up "well enough" to get the acorn nuts on.

    I'll look at the other places too, thanks all!

  9. #9
    Boolit Grand Master

    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Northwest Ohio
    Posts
    11,363
    I ussually cut and chamfer with a gile. running a nut down first. Use a fine blde in the hacksaw like 32 tpi

  10. #10
    Moderator

    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    The Pacific NorthWet
    Posts
    2,466
    file instead of gile? (Typos happen!) I probably will use a cutoff wheel in the rotary tool.

  11. #11
    Boolit Grand Master

    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Northwest Ohio
    Posts
    11,363
    Sorry my keyboard is getting old ( like the user). The cut off wheel will work then a mounted point and chamfer end. If the studs arent to long chuck inn drill motor and spin to cut chamfer. I have done it all with the cut off wheel. Chuck in lathe cut chamfer first to dept the square wheel and cut off. this gives a solid surface for the wheel and keeps threads from pulling the cut. Makes a very professional job

  12. #12
    Boolit Buddy gumbo333's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    NE by the Mighty Mo
    Posts
    173
    Run 2 nuts on, then tighten against each other to lock where you want to cut. Much easier. Then clean up, taper with the file.
    Never trade luck for skill.

  13. #13
    Boolit Master
    DonMountain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Mid-Missouri
    Posts
    1,086
    Everybody needs a set of those square thread files. I reach for them before I get out the die set. They are really good at restoring threads that have been damaged or bumped or rusted. When you live on a farm with some old equipment the files are a must.

  14. #14
    Boolit Master
    Mal Paso's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Carmel, Ca
    Posts
    2,430
    Quote Originally Posted by DonMountain View Post
    Everybody needs a set of those square thread files. I reach for them before I get out the die set. They are really good at restoring threads that have been damaged or bumped or rusted. When you live on a farm with some old equipment the files are a must.
    Yep and they pack lighter than a full set of dies. I've got 2 that cover 16 pitches.
    Mal

    Mal Paso means Bad Pass, just so you know.

  15. #15
    Boolit Grand Master



    M-Tecs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    5,906
    The term thread chasers general refers to solid hex dies that look like normally threading dies. These are not designed for cutting new threads. There primary purpose is for thread repair. https://www.mcmaster.com/thread-chasers
    2nd Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. - "A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed."

  16. #16
    Boolit Master
    DonMountain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Mid-Missouri
    Posts
    1,086
    Quote Originally Posted by Mal Paso View Post
    Yep and they pack lighter than a full set of dies. I've got 2 that cover 16 pitches.
    It must be the same set of thread files I have also. And they work very well as thread gauges too to figure out how many threads per inch an unknown bolt has. That and a bolt diameter gauge determine all you need to go purchase a new bolt when needed.

  17. #17
    Boolit Master 44magLeo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Lebanon, NY
    Posts
    667
    Why not just buy shorter bolts?
    Most hardware stores carry bolts of various lengths in most diameters.
    Leo

  18. #18
    Boolit Grand Master
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    South Jersey
    Posts
    5,430
    Did you try the Internet for vendors? https://www.google.com/search?q=thre...=firefox-b-1-m
    Regards
    John

  19. #19
    Boolit Master



    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    1,376
    See if you can borrow a die from a friend. You still might need to touch up where it was cut off.

  20. #20
    Boolit Master
    woodbutcher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    LaFollette Tn
    Posts
    1,301
    Might give Fastenal a try also.
    Good luck.Have fun.Be safe.
    Leo
    People never lie so much as after a hunt,during a war,or before an election.
    Otto von Bismarck

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check