RotoMetals2Lee PrecisionInline FabricationRepackbox
MidSouth Shooters SupplyWidenersADvertise hereTitan Reloading

Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: TIG welding bad scope mounting holes

  1. #1
    Boolit Buddy
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Homer, AK
    Posts
    195

    TIG welding bad scope mounting holes

    I've developed a way to TIG weld poorly placed scope mounting holes that is (I think) perhaps a little different and offers the 'casual' welder a way to accomplish it without too much stress. First off I have to say that the word TIG is the a magical thing that we all read about on the web. After MIG and stick welding, only oxy-fuel imparts more heat into the effort than TIG, especially when talking about short welds.

    Here is a 96 Swedish mauser that was seriously funkified.


    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	bad drill (Large).jpg 
Views:	49 
Size:	60.7 KB 
ID:	255509


    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	subject (Large).jpg 
Views:	49 
Size:	75.0 KB 
ID:	255510

    The receiver holes were at an angle and the aft one bumped the locking lug boss along with being rotated off center and pointing towards Bethlehem. The aft ones were scattershot. More or less a junk action. I have several. Filling a hole with weld to make sure there is enough material to re-drill for threads to take can be a problem. If the holes are close to being on center then the weld needs to pretty much fill the void. That is what creates a problem. In order to do so, one needs to expand it it order to fill it. I could go on about this but what I offer is a way to avoid that so I'll hope over that. Amusingly, the duplex nails showing the angled drilling is the (my) solution to the problem.

    More to come as it seems I have figure out how to dump pics to add more...

  2. #2
    Boolit Bub
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    62
    I've used tig to fix those holes, I put flush screws in holes and tig over them.

  3. #3
    Boolit Master
    elk hunter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Central Oregon
    Posts
    1,123
    I've TIG welded some holes in receivers but I've also cleaned the holes and used loctite to hold plug screws then re-drilled and tapped. This works best if the holes can be moved to leave most of the plug screw intact. I've saved some stripped holes by drilling and tapping oversize then plugging using loctite and re-drilling and tapping to the smaller, original size.
    BIG OR SMALL I LIKE THEM ALL, 577 TO 22 HORNET.

  4. #4
    Moderator Emeritus / Trusted loob groove dealer

    waksupi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Somers, Montana, a quaint little drinking village,with a severe hunting and fishing problem.
    Posts
    17,728
    Quote Originally Posted by elk hunter View Post
    I've TIG welded some holes in receivers but I've also cleaned the holes and used loctite to hold plug screws then re-drilled and tapped. This works best if the holes can be moved to leave most of the plug screw intact. I've saved some stripped holes by drilling and tapping oversize then plugging using loctite and re-drilling and tapping to the smaller, original size.
    Same here. Easy way to go about it. If the plugs are installed then the bridge blueprinted as it should be, they disappear. Even on custom actions I have never seen one that didn't need blueprinting.
    The solid soft lead bullet is undoubtably the best and most satisfactory expanding bullet that has ever been designed. It invariably mushrooms perfectly, and never breaks up. With the metal base that is essential for velocities of 2000 f.s. and upwards to protect the naked base, these metal-based soft lead bullets are splendid.
    John Taylor - "African Rifles and Cartridges"

    Forget everything you know about loading jacketed bullets. This is a whole new ball game!


  5. #5
    Boolit Master

    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Puyallup, Washington
    Posts
    2,161
    I fill lots of holes in rear bridges with tig but try to stay away from the locking lug area, don't want to mess with the heat treat there. Most of the time I will drill and tap for a bigger screw and then drill into the plug screw and tap it. I get a couple guns a month that have the screw holes messed up, sometime by the owner trying to install a scope with a hand drill.

  6. #6
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    547
    Quote Originally Posted by John Taylor View Post
    I fill lots of holes in rear bridges with tig but try to stay away from the locking lug area, don't want to mess with the heat treat there.
    as a welding engineer/inspector i cannot agree more.

  7. #7
    Boolit Buddy
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Homer, AK
    Posts
    195
    To continue: I'm not suggesting that what I'm doing is the best way to fill holes but, I believe, that it has advantages. AND I'm only talking mausers here, actions that are low to medium carbon steel that are cased in areas for wear. I am not a Jerry K. kinda guy that believes that if your 98 gets too close the the campfire on a moose hunt it then needs to be sent off to Blanchard's.

    I take a duplex 8d nail and cut off the top head leaving a little extra above the second head. Why duplex? For to have a little more material on top. I haven't tied a common but box nails have a thin head. They cost me 1.29 per LB and are mild steel. They are cut off at the appropriate length for depth, the ones to fill the threaded areas, of course, being short of the thread bottom:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	pin (Large).jpg 
Views:	19 
Size:	42.7 KB 
ID:	255574

    A drill near the size of the nailhead is used to make a small countersink:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	countersunk (Large).jpg 
Views:	27 
Size:	49.7 KB 
ID:	255575

    NOTE: The bad holes were enlarged with a number drill slightly smaller than the nail diameter so that these 'studs' can be hammered in making a friction fit. And now the fun part for all you maybe tig weldors, and actually one of my points. Strike the arc on top of the nail and within 2-3 seconds it forms a ball. Then, only orbiting around this ball very shortly one sees it slump a bit and joint with the parent metal. This takes all of 10-12 seconds. STOP. Do not wander over to the parent material, period! Bow compressed air over the assembly for 30-45 seconds and after that, one can put bare fingers on it. Now we have a proud pimple that is attached to the parent material. But! someone needs to help me figure out how to delete pics because I'm over the 10mb limit and can't figure out how to do it in order to continue!

  8. #8
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Kaneohe, HI
    Posts
    3,890
    Just found out how to delete pictures/attachments from my profile.
    Go to the box at the top right of the page.
    It has you name in it.
    Click on the small arrow next to your name.
    Click on "inbox"
    On the left side of the page, starts with My Messages, Scroll down until you reach the "Settings" box.
    At the bottom of the box, look for "attachments"
    Click on it to open.
    In that page you will see all your pictures.
    Go through them and delete those that are not relevant to you, or us.
    Hope this helps.

  9. #9
    Boolit Buddy
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Homer, AK
    Posts
    195
    abu, thanks so much! I tried every way. Not very intuitive to say the least.

    To continue: here is the pimple that has no surface disturbance of the parent material:


    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	pimple (Large).jpg 
Views:	18 
Size:	36.9 KB 
ID:	255646

    So on so forth holes are filled one at time and the result after filing and sanding:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	done (Large).jpg 
Views:	19 
Size:	47.5 KB 
ID:	255648

    A little Birchwood, pick the altered one:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	birchwood (Large).jpg 
Views:	21 
Size:	74.2 KB 
ID:	255649

    The advantages of this way:

    1) The least amount of heat put to the action

    2) No disturbance to the parent material - no ripples - making for easy finishing

    3) No other threads or (potentially) hardened screws to deal with

    The disadvantages of this way:

    1) Mild steel studs may not take hot blue
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	end (Large).jpg 
Views:	18 
Size:	60.5 KB 
ID:	255650  

  10. #10
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Kaneohe, HI
    Posts
    3,890
    Looks good

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check