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Thread: Questions on salvaging a burned up 1911

  1. #21
    Boolit Buddy
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    if a NRA member you have $2500 on top of home owners coverage

  2. #22
    Boolit Grand Master

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    If the springs are soft so are the locking lugs do not salvage these!

  3. #23
    Boolit Master
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    I doubt that the frame and slide have any special heat treat. If those parts are heat treated after machining they would warp. To satisfy your own curiosity just put enough parts back into one to get it to fire. That would be the recoil spring, hammer and trigger spring.
    Then test fire it remotely with factory ammo.
    The frame does not see much stress since the barrel locks into the slide. They were even made with aluminum frames which are not very hard. (Machining speeds for aluminum are about 10 times the machining speeds for steel as a data point)
    The only part of the slide that sees much stress are the locking shoulders. The locking shoulders of the slide and the barrel are easy to see to tell if they are deforming. Given the design of the 1911 lock up I would not expect them to yield with the .45 ACP pressures.

    If the slide and barrel locking surfaces do not yield in 25 or 30 rounds (a statistically valid sample size) then they will probably never yield.
    Even if put back into service I would not spend more than the minimum to get it working reliably. It is always going to be an ugly burned gun.
    EDG

  4. #24
    Boolit Master

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    I was going to buy extra insurance for my guns once, and after I got the quote, I said no thanks! For 14 months of insurance I bought a fire proof safe.
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    only to God and my own conscience.

  5. #25
    Boolit Grand Master



    M-Tecs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EDG View Post
    I doubt that the frame and slide have any special heat treat.
    The pre-1920's 1911's were spot-heat treated in places like the slide stop detent using an open flame and oil quench. I don't believe the frames were. This created some issues and I have read various claims as to what the heat treatment specs were changed to. The post 20's to mid 60's 1911 were harder but they were not hard enough to withstand the heavy usage that the NRA Bullseye shooter subjected them to. This lead to the so-called "Hard" slides that were used for building "National Match" pistols. Some of them were hard enough that the slide would crack if you squeezed them to much when you did NM builds. I personally have cracked three NM hard slides.

    Today's heat treatment and alloy specifications have advanced significantly since 1911 but each manufacture may have there own specs.

    On 4140 steel the slides are normally heat treated to a Rockwell C in the low 40's. The frames are usually a few points lower.

    38-42 is normal for a 4140 steel slides and 34-36 for the frames.

    For stainless 38-42 normal for slides with the frames running about 10 points lower. SS tend to gall if they HT specs are closer.

    Some of the cast steel frames that used to be commonly listed in Shotgun News tended not to be heat treated.
    2nd Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. - "A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed."

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  6. #26
    Boolit Grand Master



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    Quote Originally Posted by Hickory View Post
    I was going to buy extra insurance for my guns once, and after I got the quote, I said no thanks! For 14 months of insurance I bought a fire proof safe.
    Home owner riders covering additional firearms insurance tend to be extremely expensive. Some of the stand alone policies are realistic. The $2,500 insurance you get with the NRA membership is a great value.
    2nd Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. - "A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed."

    "Before you argue with someone, ask yourself, is that person even mentally mature enough to grasp the concept of different perspectives? Because if not, there’s absolutely no point."

    – Amber Veal

  7. #27
    Boolit Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by M-Tecs View Post
    The pre-1920's 1911's were spot-heat treated in places like the slide stop detent using an open flame and oil quench. I don't believe the frames were. This created some issues and I have read various claims as to what the heat treatment specs were changed to. The post 20's to mid 60's 1911 were harder but they were not hard enough to withstand the heavy usage that the NRA Bullseye shooter subjected them to. This lead to the so-called "Hard" slides that were used for building "National Match" pistols. Some of them were hard enough that the slide would crack if you squeezed them to much when you did NM builds. I personally have cracked three NM hard slides.

    Today's heat treatment and alloy specifications have advanced significantly since 1911 but each manufacture may have there own specs.

    On 4140 steel the slides are normally heat treated to a Rockwell C in the low 40's. The frames are usually a few points lower.

    38-42 is normal for a 4140 steel slides and 34-36 for the frames.

    For stainless 38-42 normal for slides with the frames running about 10 points lower. SS tend to gall if they HT specs are closer.

    Some of the cast steel frames that used to be commonly listed in Shotgun News tended not to be heat treated.
    i agree that this is a fair assessment. the heat treatment is done in semi-final machining stage with +20 thou stock still on, and ceramic inserts for shape stability. if the gun was over 600* the temper is prolly affected negatively, especially if there was firefighting at play...

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Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check