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Thread: Bluing an old 92 winchester

  1. #1
    Boolit Buddy
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    Bluing an old 92 winchester

    Can anybody recommend what the best cold blue would be, I'd like to have it hot blued but that is way out of my budget, so I thought I would try cold bluing it myself.

  2. #2
    Boolit Master

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    Oxy-blue works pretty good for me.
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  3. #3
    Boolit Master

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    Brownell's Oxpho Blue works well. I've done some major parts, like a barrel, with it and been satisfied with the outcome. Some folks have used it for the entire gun. It really shines for small parts and touch-ups.

    I've never had good luck with the Birchwood Casey products like Perma-Blue. 44-40 cold blue is O.K. for small parts, but I've never gotten it to work well on large areas without streaking and color variations.

    For awhile a product called Blue Magic was used by a lot of home gunsmiths. I never tried it.

    Not having seen your '92 I'm hesitant to recommend a spray coating, but the sprays seem to be replacing cold blue for refinishing. There are paints and epoxies with various brand names, some just sprayed on like Brownell's Aluma Hyde II and allowed to air dry, and some requiring baking in an oven after application.

    I'm old school on bluing, and believe that a properly done hot blue is best in appearance, but admit that it's not necessarily the best for durability.

    There are also the alternatives of rust bluing and Belgian bluing. These can be done at home, but you need to read up on the processes before attempting.

  4. #4
    Boolit Master

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    Brownell's is good stuff.

    I did a 'in the white' Shilen heavy varmint barrel with it, and the project came out pretty nice.

    I did warm the barrel some, and let soaked rags sit & soak on it several times over a few days.

    It isn't as good as hot tank blueing on a big project, but its not too bad either.
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  5. #5
    Boolit Master Shawlerbrook's Avatar
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    I will say that unless an old Winchester 1892 is a total disaster, I would leave it as is rather than cold blue. Cold blue is ok for a touch up or small parts, but .........

  6. #6
    Boolit Buddy
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    I don't like cold blue other than for touching up a screw head etc. If it is an old model 92, hot blue won't look right. Best bet is to rust blue it. You can do it with minimal cost and your rifle with look nice. A lot of times, cold blue looks nice while you are inside your house, take it out into the sunshine and you will see a different story. Depending on its condition, you may well be better off leaving it alone as someone suggested.
    Phil

  7. #7
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  8. #8
    Boolit Mold Metrobluing's Avatar
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    Try Brownells Dicropan IM hot water bluing. Very simple to use and the finish is awesome.

  9. #9
    Boolit Master
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    Depending on the condition, if you can't polish out all pits and scratches you might want to brown it.
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  10. #10
    Boolit Master
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    If you go the browning route, I have had good luck with Birchwood Casey Plum Brown and just followed the instructions on the bottle. The average home oven is large enough to put the average barreled receiver in it to get to the recommended temperature to get the best results. GF

  11. #11
    Boolit Grand Master



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    Rust bluing takes more time but way better durability.

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  12. #12
    Boolit Man
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    Go the rust blue. It is easy just takes time.
    Laurel valley forge browning solution works for bluing as well just have to follow the instructions for bluing vs browning.

  13. #13
    Boolit Master

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    There was a gentleman here on CB that used to sell a rust bluing concoction but ststed he had to stop for awhile. I think it is about time he should be back in the BST section hawking his wares, hopefully soon as I would like to try it too.

  14. #14
    Boolit Buddy
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    I've used many different rust bluing solutions over the years. I have found the Laurel Mountain product to be very forgiving and I won't use any other going forward.
    Phil

  15. #15
    Boolit Master
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    I did an entire revolver with Van's Instant Gun Blue and was very happy with the results.

  16. #16
    Boolit Master

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    No matter which cold blue you use or how good (maybe "not-so-bad" might be a better choice of words than "good"!) it might turn out it will be very temporary. Any of that stuff you can find is not going to be very durable and will wear off in spots with any use at all, even a wall hanger will look bad before long. Cold blue may be ok for touch ups but for overall bluing projects it just plain sucks and that's saying mildly. The rust blue suggestions are far better with rust blue being very easy to do and inexpensive plus the finish is not only very attractive it's the most durable blue you can apply to a firearm, even more durable than hot blue. Rust blue can be found on expensive custom firearms and has been used for eons on notable high end custom shotguns and rifles so it's not exactly a secondary choice to hot blue. As pointed out rust blue is easy to do and inexpensive but a bit time consuming, however the express blues as they are called can shorten the time required considerably. I have been using the "Mark Lee Express blue" product and find that I prefer it over anything else I have used, with this product a real and beautiful firearm finish can be achieved in only hours instead of days as required by traditional slow rust blue methods and honestly I can't tell the difference between the two. The Express blue seems to be as durable and looks every bit as good as the traditional rust blue but is done in a fraction of time however there simply is no comparison between either rust blue method to any cold blue on the market. Rust blue doesn't require much in the way of equipment either, just a few simple items you likely already have plus a tank big enough to boil water to submerge the rifle or rifle parts in, it really is quite simple to do.
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