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Thread: RCBS Melters and Ground Fault Protection

  1. #1
    Boolit Master Good Cheer's Avatar
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    RCBS Melters and Ground Fault Protection

    On circuits with ground fault protection (with the push button reset on the wall outlets), the RCBS melters cause the circuit breakers to kick out.
    Is there anything to be done other than getting rid of the ground fault protector outlets?

  2. #2
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    ShooterAZ's Avatar
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    Mine did this when it was brand new. I ran an extension to a non-GFI outlet for the first few casting sessions, and after that it was fine. I have read that there may be some some residual moisture in the new elements, causing this to occur.

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    I found a number of threads regarding this issue using the Google search function for this site. If yours isn't brand new you might want to take a look there, you may have to upgrade your GFCI to a higher amps.

  4. #4
    Boolit Master Good Cheer's Avatar
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    Thanks for the responses.
    I've been wondering if the reasonable thing to do wouldn't just be to install standard outlets.

  5. #5
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    I guess that's always an option. Where I cast there is a water faucet very nearby. I actually replaced the standard outlet there with a GFCI for that very reason.

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    Boolit Grand Master

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    I think quite a lot of them do it when they are new. It's something about the elements that has to burn off or get seated or something. But by about pot #5 or 6, I can put mine back in the GFCI outlet and they'll work forever more in there with no problems.
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  7. #7
    Boolit Grand Master

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    I understand that the insulation in the ProMelt may be damp when new and will trip a GFCI. If its not a new pot you might try it on another non GFCI protected outlet. GFCI outlets serve a purpose but can be a PITA.

  8. #8
    Boolit Master
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    Have seen GFCI outlets go bad, may need replacement. Other issue is why is it tripping, might want to check the pot. There should be no continuity between either neutral or hot blade on the plug, should be with the ground.

  9. #9
    Boolit Buddy
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    GFCI's have a dislike for resistive loads, seen it many times when plugging in the engine block heaters or stock tank heaters. The units test out ok and work on a std plug but any GFI tried will trip. Gotten to were we don't use them on any of the shop circuits, only near water areas like bath room and kitchen sinks. Proper grounding with 3 wire plugs that are wired with the hot to the correct pole will do most all shock protection short of standing in water. My not be code but IMHO it's worked for years. The GFCI does work as designed when plugging in a 2 wire device that shorts but thats more because the hot can be reversed to be on the wrong side of the switch.
    Shaune509

  10. #10
    Boolit Grand Master

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    GFCI outlets can , after a few years , start malfunctioning . If it has been there a while , change it out to good grade outlet . The builder grade (cheap) GFCI outlets in our new office started tripping for no reason after about 5 years . Replaced them with better brand and that fixed the tripping .
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  11. #11
    Boolit Bub
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    Quote Originally Posted by ShooterAZ View Post
    Mine did this when it was brand new. I ran an extension to a non-GFI outlet for the first few casting sessions, and after that it was fine. I have read that there may be some some residual moisture in the new elements, causing this to occur.
    Mine did exactly the same thing.

  12. #12
    Boolit Master
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    If all ya'll think GFCI's are a PITA today, you should have been around when they first came out in the early 80's. I was a Master Electrician for 42 years and trust me, those of today are a VAST improvement over the early ones. If you peed downstream from the old ones they would trip.

    What everyone has said could be the case. Run a couple pots through it and try it again.

    We raised beef for a couple decades and back then, I never had anything close to a stock tank on a GFCI. If the heater didn't trip it a heavy dew would.

    I believe the current NEC is the same as before I retired regarding GFCI's. Anything counter served, (not just close to water, ANYTHING on a counter, kitchen, island, laundry, bath, etc.), outside, unfinished areas, (attics, basements, crawl spaces) and the obvious hot tubs, swimming pools and no doubt some I am forgetting.
    "In general, the art of government is to take as much money as possible from one class of citizens and give it to another class of citizens" Voltaire'

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  13. #13
    Boolit Grand Master

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    Quote Originally Posted by sharps4590 View Post
    If all ya'll think GFCI's are a PITA today, you should have been around when they first came out in the early 80's. I was a Master Electrician for 42 years and trust me, those of today are a VAST improvement over the early ones. If you peed downstream from the old ones they would trip.
    This is the absolute truth! I think I got my license in 1979 and worked until 2015. The newer ones are much better.

    But, back to the ProMelt. Use it a few times on a standard outlet and then try the GFCI circuit again.

  14. #14
    Boolit Master
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    lightman, we ran about the same period. I got my Journeyman's in '79 and my Master's in '81. I semi-retired in 2015 and finally hung up my tool belt for good last summer. I grew up in the electrical field helping Dad from the time I was about 12. I feel as if the term "attic rat" was named for me!!!
    "In general, the art of government is to take as much money as possible from one class of citizens and give it to another class of citizens" Voltaire'

    The common virtue of capitalism is the sharing of equal opportunity. The common vice of socialism is the equal sharing of misery

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  15. #15
    Boolit Grand Master

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    Wow Sharps, we sound a lot alike! My Dad was an industrial electrician and him and a working buddy ran a sideline business that got to be pretty big. I grew up around it and got my Journeymans license about when you did and my Masters a little later. I got a job with the power company and retired as a Serviceman but I continued to work in Dads sideline business and eventually took it over, working two jobs. I eventually moved into Agricultural work, Grain Systems, irrigation wells, aeration equipment of fish farms, ect.

  16. #16
    Boolit Master
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    I, too, was a Journeyman electrician for 38 years. I wired my reloading bench outlets on a separate 20 amp circuit with a GFCI breaker. My Lee 20 pound pot worked just fine. I got a used RCBS ProMelt pot and it tripped the breaker. Sent the pot in and RCBS rebuilt it, got it back and it tripped the circuit again. Worked fine on a regular outlet, but haven't used it much; just chalked it up to "nuisance tripping". I could never find anything with my Fluke multi-meter, so may just have to use it a few times and see if it straightens out with use.
    Last edited by mazo kid; 01-25-2020 at 10:21 PM.
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  17. #17
    Boolit Bub
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    I am a building inspector (code enforcement officer) not an electrician. It is not unusual to see new GFCI breakers defective from the manufacturer.

  18. #18
    Boolit Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by Good Cheer View Post
    Thanks for the responses.
    I've been wondering if the reasonable thing to do wouldn't just be to install standard outlets.
    That's what I did a long time ago. The GFCI's are really intended for protection around wet areas.

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Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check