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Thread: Lyman Spartan press linkage assembly compatibility?

  1. #1
    Boolit Buddy MarkK's Avatar
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    Lyman Spartan press linkage assembly compatibility?

    Wondering if the linkage assembly from Pacific C-presses would be compatible with a Lyman Spartan press? I ask because I just bought a Spartan missing the arm and linkages as well as the ram. Perhaps someone has been there done that? Thanks for your time.
    When you want to fool the world, tell the truth. Otto von Bismarck

  2. #2
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    Mark, it should work. Some things to look out for are the diameter of the pivot pin, shape of the block and length of the link. The rams are all the same so in theory you should be able to swap parts between any of the presses that use the Pacific style linkage, RCBS Jr presses, C-H, later down stroke Pacific's and other's too numerous to mention.

    If you need more information I can run downstairs and dismantle some presses to see what actually works, how valid my theory is.

    Ken
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  3. #3
    Boolit Buddy MarkK's Avatar
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    Thanks Ken. The press arrives tomorrow. Beyond the missing block, linkage, pins and handle it will need a complete restoration - rust removal and new paint. I have Pacific presses with rounded/squared blocks and links. I think one of these configurations will work. From that point, I will search for the parts. However, this also provides an impetus to take a machine shop class at the local maker space.
    When you want to fool the world, tell the truth. Otto von Bismarck

  4. #4
    Boolit Master
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    Mark I've compared Spartan parts to other c frame presses (but not a Pacific c) of the era. I couldn't get anything to match up. Sometimes I just wait until I find another parts press and make 2 out of one. I find bringing the old reloading tools back to life as close to how they were when they left the factory very enjoyable. Good luck on your project and keep us post on your progress as I really enjoy the restoration projects.

  5. #5
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    Looks like my plans for the day just changed, now it's trying parts between presses to solve this question.
    Antique Reloading Tool Collector, Historian and Writer
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  6. #6
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    Mark, I just finished working on presses. The square block linkage is a drop in fit, either the older up-stroke or newer down-stroke. Some of the other Pacific's with a cast block may be different.
    But, generally the Spartan is machined for a convertible up or down block so there is plenty of clearance.

    Ken
    Antique Reloading Tool Collector, Historian and Writer
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  7. #7
    Boolit Buddy MarkK's Avatar
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    That’s great news Ken! Many thanks! I’m pretty sure I have Pacific parts that will work. I will look into what is involved in machining duplicate parts. Will also hit the next gun show on the chance I find what I need.

    I concur with Iowa Fox and probably many others here. Even if it isn’t a full blown restoration simply getting these old presses up and running again makes one feel good. BTW, I’ve used Rustloleum oil based paints and spray paints in past restorations but wonder what others use. Crinkle coat?
    Last edited by MarkK; 01-15-2020 at 07:55 PM.
    When you want to fool the world, tell the truth. Otto von Bismarck

  8. #8
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    Mark, I cannot help you with painting. I never do it, clean them and use a rust preventer if necessary. In my way of looking at them, paint removes collector value. And I have never found an old press that was in that rough of shape.

    Ken
    Antique Reloading Tool Collector, Historian and Writer
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    Archive manager, Antique Reloading Tool Collectors Association
    email: pressman@antiquereloadingtools.com
    www.antiquereloadingtools.com

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Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check