Lee PrecisionRepackboxADvertise hereRotoMetals2
Inline FabricationTitan ReloadingWideners

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 30

Thread: help me pick

  1. #1
    Boolit Master

    LUCKYDAWG13's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Northern Illinois
    Posts
    3,152

    help me pick

    Need a little help with this I'm looking at getting a new to me S&W first up is a model 65 - 3 4" barrel looks vary clean $550
    next up is a 686-4 also with a 4" barrel gun looks used not beet up but not as clean as the 65-3 $630 + tax
    anyway I'm stuck on witch way to go would the extra $100 bux be worth it for the rear sight
    thanks
    kids that hunt and fish dont mug old ladies

  2. #2
    Boolit Master

    Winger Ed.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Just outside Gun Barrel City, Texas
    Posts
    1,742
    As a carry gun, I'd stay with the small rear sight.

    Since I'd only use it for target shooting, I'd definitely get the one with the adjustable/target rear sight.
    As time goes on, you'll find it is easier to see and get a better/quicker sight picture too.
    Everyone can learn from their mistakes.
    However; it's less painful, and cheaper to learn from the mistakes of others.

    Old age and treachery will always overcome youth, and skill.

    OK folks. Enough of this idle chit chat. This ain't no retirement home.
    EVERYONE!!
    Back to your oars. The Captain wants to waterski.

  3. #3
    Boolit Master

    LUCKYDAWG13's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Northern Illinois
    Posts
    3,152
    Quote Originally Posted by Winger Ed. View Post
    As a carry gun, I'd stay with the small rear sight.

    Since I'd only use it for target shooting, I'd definitely get the one with the adjustable/target rear sight.
    As time goes on, you'll find it is easier to see and get a better/quicker sight picture too.
    Thats a good point
    kids that hunt and fish dont mug old ladies

  4. #4
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    30 miles South of Cheyenne, unfortunately
    Posts
    1,013
    Quote Originally Posted by Winger Ed. View Post
    As a carry gun, I'd stay with the small rear sight.

    Since I'd only use it for target shooting, I'd definitely get the one with the adjustable/target rear sight.
    As time goes on, you'll find it is easier to see and get a better/quicker sight picture too.
    That pretty much covers it.
    There are 550 million arms in worldwide circulation. This is 1 firearm for every 12 people on the planet. The only question is , HOW DO WE ARM THE OTHER !!? The Lord of War.

  5. #5
    Boolit Master RU shooter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    SW Pa.
    Posts
    2,319
    If Planning on carrying the 65 , shot more the 686
    If you find yourself in a fair fight, your tactics suck!

  6. #6
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    2,621
    It is absolutely worth the rear sight. My 3" SP101 with frame notch shoots around 4-5" at 25 yards. My 3" SP101 with fully adjustable rear sight shoots 3" at 50 yards

    There is only one single instance I'll give up the rear sight, and that is a gun for pocket carry. Everything else, a rear sight is nothing but an advantage.

  7. #7
    Boolit Master


    georgerkahn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    South of the (Canada) border
    Posts
    1,566
    Adding my two pennies... Some Birchwood Casey Lead Removing clothClick image for larger version. 

Name:	Birch de Lead Cloth.JPG 
Views:	5 
Size:	90.8 KB 
ID:	254474and amazingly little effort on your behalf should make either look like new -- obviously as long there are no major scratches or similar in the finish. I've found it takes three 1" square cut pieces to eradicate ALL the black rings/stains on front of cylinder -- but that, too, will come out looking as factory new.
    If either revolver locks good, and functions well in both single- as well as double-action operation, I'd go for the 686-4. My reasons include the fact that the 686 always seem to be in high demand, and should you ever wish to sell/trade -- I do believe you'd do quite better than with the 65-3. Further, as others mentioned, the adjustable sight is more than a wee "plus". For what it's worth, way back I had a no-dash 65, and needed to trade it for a firearm I "had to have" -- and surely didn't make any profit vis the 65 -- almost new, and hardly fired as well...
    BOTH are great revolvers... I "hear" your tough choice... BEST!
    geo

  8. #8
    Boolit Master bdicki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    991
    Nobody said it yet so I'll say it, get both.

  9. #9
    Boolit Master

    LUCKYDAWG13's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Northern Illinois
    Posts
    3,152
    Quote Originally Posted by bdicki View Post
    Nobody said it yet so I'll say it, get both.
    I wish that I could but I'm starting to think more about the rear sights I'm not getting any younger
    kids that hunt and fish dont mug old ladies

  10. #10
    Boolit Grand Master tazman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    west central Illinois
    Posts
    6,169
    I have found, with my eyes, any stainless or chromed handgun that does not have an adjustable rear sight is very hard to aim. The shiny surface of the stainless steel or chrome just disappears and I can't aim them properly.
    Blued guns such as a model 13 or model 10 are no problem.
    You may never have this issue so the choice will be personal.

  11. #11
    Moderator Emeritus


    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    SW Montana
    Posts
    10,602
    In a very few cases S&W was seeing cracked K frames where the forcing cone and frame met. As I understand it that was the reason to go to the L frames, 586/686. etc. I have a great shooting 44 Magnum on a strengthened L frame, model 69.
    I would go for the 686 but would be OK with the 65 if I shot mostly 38's and carried 357's, just as the police issued that would do in the 50's, 60's and 70's.
    [The Montana Gianni] Front sight and squeeze

  12. #12
    Boolit Master

    Winger Ed.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Just outside Gun Barrel City, Texas
    Posts
    1,742
    I had a 6" 'L' frame with the target trigger & adjustable sights back in the 90's.
    I only sold it to help buy a Gold Cup.

    Of the few years I had it:
    I never had a moment of buyers remorse, or had to make excuses for it.

    As a carry gun, that big rear sight just looked like it would want to hang up on clothing.
    Everyone can learn from their mistakes.
    However; it's less painful, and cheaper to learn from the mistakes of others.

    Old age and treachery will always overcome youth, and skill.

    OK folks. Enough of this idle chit chat. This ain't no retirement home.
    EVERYONE!!
    Back to your oars. The Captain wants to waterski.

  13. #13
    Boolit Grand Master
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Central Virginia
    Posts
    6,253
    What we are talking about are two Stainless Steel S&W revolvers:
    One a magnum K-frame with fixed sights and the other a L-frame with adjustable sights.

    If the OP intends to shoot a lot of magnum rounds, the L-frame 686 is the clear choice and we are done right there.
    If the OP is thinking more along the line of a carry gun that will be used with 38 Special ammo most of the time, the model 65 K-frame becomes the favorite due to its lower weight & bulk. I actually prefer fixed sights for "working" guns. Fixed sights don't get out of adjustment, are less prone to snagging on things and are far more durable than adjustable sights.

    I'm going to offer another angle on this discussion, the model 65-3 represents the K-frame, "duty gun" of the past and they are no longer made in that original style. Yeah, you can get a newer model with MIM parts, two piece barrel, internal lock, etc. but S&W doesn't make that classic stainless K-frame Dash 3 model anymore. So if the OP is looking more for a 38 Special that can occasionally shoot magnum rounds, I would vote for the model 65-3. If the OP is looking for a DA revolver dedicated to shooting the .357 magnum, the L-frame is the logical choice.

  14. #14
    Boolit Master

    LUCKYDAWG13's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Northern Illinois
    Posts
    3,152
    I'm content shooting 38 Special loads but like the option of 357 and yes I would put it in carry rotation once in a while
    kids that hunt and fish dont mug old ladies

  15. #15
    Boolit Grand Master
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Central Virginia
    Posts
    6,253
    Quote Originally Posted by LUCKYDAWG13 View Post
    I'm content shooting 38 Special loads but like the option of 357 and yes I would put it in carry rotation once in a while
    I can't decide for you but I will say that I shoot far more 38 Special rounds than 357 mag rounds. If that sounds like where you are headed, the K-frame is a great gun for that use.

    The L-frame is the clear choice if you intend to shoot a lot of magnum rounds. If the gun will essentially be a 38 Special gun that is occasionally loaded with 357 mag rounds, the K-frame has a lot going for it.

  16. #16
    Boolit Master


    rfd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    NJ via TX
    Posts
    3,456
    an interesting dilemma of sorts and i asked that of myself awhile back and came up with this answer - i have an S&W 642 j-frame snubby .38spl 1.875" w/frame rear sight for EDC, and an S&W 67 k-frame .38spl 4" w/adj. rear sight for range and target (and even EDC during the "more clothing" months if need be). i have no need for a .357mag nor a hi-cap pistol as the aforementioned guns work well enuf for me, ymmv.
    "Owning a handgun doesn't make you armed any more than owning a guitar makes you a musician." - Jeff Cooper

  17. #17
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Las Cruces, NM
    Posts
    1,344
    And I am the opposite. If I am carrying a revolver it is for the extra oomph of the magnum rounds.

  18. #18
    Boolit Master
    bigted's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Sweet Home Oregon
    Posts
    4,174
    So early on I found training manuals from both OSP and FBI and set about training myself in defensive shooting in a instinctive shoot emergency need condition.

    I learned to shoot in instinctive mode NOT "sighting" in particular but having your revolver/pistol "under" line of sight and using perifial sighting only and focusing on the objective with every instinct focused on your decision to or not to engage your adversary. Upon the decision to engage ... never losing track of adversary's ... single or more ... in double action ... with your weapon in your lower , slightly out of focus ... "aim" center of mass and continue firing and advancing in the offensive mode till no threat is detected.

    In this condition ... getting your weapon in battery as quickly as possible ... is primary ... therefore a snag or catch of any kind is very much to be avoided.

    No bulky rear sight and a blaze orange or even vivid white front in a smooth angled configuration is to be sought.

    7 or 9 inch groups are perfect at "combat" range ... from touching distance to 20 or so FEET. After this distance the threat of endangering self drops very dramatically.

    However if squirrels n rabbits and utmost accuracy is to be required ... those high "snagable" sights are a must.

    Just my 2 cents ... prolly worth exactly what you paid for it.
    WHEN ALL IS SAID AND DONE...MORE WILL BE SAID THEN DONE

  19. #19
    Boolit Grand Master
    Mk42gunner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Butler, MO
    Posts
    6,252
    I like K frames better than L frames, had both a 6" 586 and a 4" 686 years ago, they both went down the road fairly quickly, I have a 4" 65-3 right now that will probably stay for the duration.

    I mainly plink with it with .38's and few less than maximum .357 Magnum rounds; if I want to shoot full snort .357's I have Rugers for them.

    Robert

  20. #20
    Boolit Master Dan Cash's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Western North Dakota
    Posts
    3,096
    Contrary to many experts here, I will suggest the model 65. If the sights don't pleas you, paint them black. The 65 will likely have a superior trigger and unless it has been beaten to death by .357 mag 125 grain ammo, you can probably shoot it the rest of your life and not wear it out. The 125 grain loads are responsible for the cracked forcing cones on the K frame Smiths. I have one stainless model 66 and a model 19 regular steel revolver which have had far in excess of 2000 rounds of .357 mag ammo through each of them. They are tight and crack free.

    That is a lot of ammo. How much do you think you will shoot? If the price of the gun is an issue with you and you are not already a caster and reloader, it is unlikely you will buy enough .357 to wear out your revolver.
    To paraphrase Ronald Reagan, the trouble with many shooting experts is not that they're ignorant; its just that they know so much that isn't so.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check