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Thread: Sore fingers

  1. #1
    Boolit Bub Andyt591's Avatar
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    Sore fingers

    I'm not 100% certain that this is the right place for this, but...

    My fingers are a bit sore today. I sized all of my 30-30 cases. Then I hand trimmed them (no machine, just a hand tool). Next I deburred 100 of them and used my RCBS universal hand primer to install the primers. Tomorrow night (or sometime this weekend) I plan on loading them. Wish me luck because this is my first solo batch of cartridges using my own equipment. I'm trying to decide on a starting powder charge right now. It might take me a couple of days but I think I'm going to end up settling on 28.3 gn of powder. It's a little towards the high end of the middle of the minimum and maximum. IMR 4895 w/ Sierra 150 gn round nose bullets.

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  2. #2
    Boolit Grand Master

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    The brass looks good. I would recommend a small number of rounds at starting load and work up from there to where you want to be. All firearms are slightly different when it comes to loads. Be sage and work up. ( I have a 308 that flattens primers with factory loads ) chamber, throat, leade angle all have a bearing on pressure produced. I would recommend starting at min or even slightly below. load 4 rounds and fire watching primers case extraction and expansion. then work up in .3-.5 grn increments. A chronograph can be a big help working up loads

  3. #3
    Boolit Master

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    For a 30-30 it probably won't matter. I decide upon a charge based upon the accuracy node in the velocity range that I am looking for. I work up a load ladder with 3-5 cartridges at a given charge and shoot for accuracy over a chronograph to get velocity information to go along with my accuracy/precision on target. Usually I end up at less than the max charge where the accuracy is best and the velocity extreme spread or SD is low or lowest. But this if for loading a precision bolt gun for long range work.

    For the 30-30, I'd only load 5-10 at whatever charge you decide. Check for function in the rifle and accuracy on target before you go all out and load them all. If may just be that your rifle may not like that load or bullet and then you won't have to break down the remaining 90 cartridges.

    Always load a few, check first to make sure they are satisfactory to you, then load up the rest once the load is proven.

    Brad

  4. #4
    Boolit Master

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    country gent, ya posted while I was typing. Looks like you and I are on the same page. Hated to not at least provide a little advice when I saw Andy's post.

    Good Luck Andyt.

    At the very least, load a ladder of single cartridges, starting at the starting load and up in 1 grain or 1/2 grain increments up to where you want to be. Check primers and extraction to make sure you aren't going overpressure as country gent suggested.

    Brad

  5. #5
    Boolit Grand Master popper's Avatar
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    Find the longest of the sized but untrimmed brass, check it in the rifle. If it fits, don't need to do it! Debur just removes flash after trimming. 28-29 of 4895 is good, won't make much difference if it's a lever gun. Just about can't go wrong with 30/30. Seating depth is more critical - so it doesn't jam bullet into the rifling. Don't crimp too hard, just remove the flair - don't worry about the cannular/crimp groove. Push the bullet nose on a hard surface, if COAL doesn't change much you're good. I still flare the neck for flat based jacketed, don't want to bulge the thin necked case -boat tail isn't a problem. Doesn't take much, needle nose pliers or such, just simple twist in the mouth just so you feel a slight flare with your fingers. Load a few dummys, find what fits and then load 20 or so to test fire. Get a wilson (or other) case gauge and check FIRED case to find position of the shoulder. Adjust your size die to set the shoulder back a couple thousandths. Brass will last longer. Rifle chamber and size die are NOT the same. Expect 5-6 reloadings before neck splits or annealing is needed.
    Whatever!

  6. #6
    Boolit Grand Master

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    Good Luck Andy !

    Few words of advice ... Before loading a large batch , make sure the load is accurate , does what you want and every round will feed , chamber and eject smoothly .

    Get a bullet puller... at some point in time you will need to use one .

    Things change , don't load all your empty brass , keep some sized primed and ready for testing new bullets , powders and primers .

    Load Safe ...no awards are given for speed loading or quantity of ammo .
    Gary
    Certified Cajun
    Proud Member of The Basket of Deplorables

  7. #7
    Boolit Bub Andyt591's Avatar
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    I have several hundred cases of 30-30 brass, but, yes, I figure I will only load 20 at a time and try them as I go. So far, though, with past loads (in different calibers) I have been very VERY lucky in picking a load that is on the high end of middle.

  8. #8
    Boolit Grand Master


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    Your 4895 load should give you real close to 2000 FPS, plenty good enough for deer hunting.

    Seems like the shooting public has forgotten what a wonderful thing the .30-30 is. It's a great cartridge, plenty capable for most of the big game hunting done in this country and it is a lot more versatile if you handload and cast for it.

    What rifle are you shooting these in?

  9. #9
    Boolit Grand Master

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    Wishing you Luck on your first solo! Like the others say, do your workup in small batches. Don't let the good luck you have had in the past surprise you and cause you to have several hundred loaded rounds to pull down. Your load, and the 30-30 cartridge are both pretty forgiving but..........

    Case prep is one of the things that many of us hate doing. As we gain experience, most of us improve on out tooling, looking for faster and easier ways. I can trim between 16 cases pre minute at a sustained rate on my Giraud trimmer and it makes my fingers sore. And that sucker cost $500!

  10. #10
    Boolit Master
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    You didn't mention your rifle, but my pair of 30-30 Marlin 336's prefer about 34.5 grains of Winchester 748 with the 150 grain bullets.
    If it was easy, anybody could do it.

  11. #11
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    JonB_in_Glencoe's Avatar
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    Andyt591,
    Welcome to the forum.

    It's always best to work up to a load, using the starting load in a reloading manual.
    http://castboolits.gunloads.com/show...-a-ladder-test
    ..search "ladder test" for more info.

    Have you read a good reloading manual? The First half of most reloading manuals have a wealth of information that is important to new reloaders. I prefer Lyman, but there are others out there.

    ...
    PS, I moved your thread to a better suited forum...while this is a cast bullet loads section and you are using jacketed bullets, have no worries, we've all been there and can help you with your project.

    Good Luck.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    “If someone has a gun and is trying to kill you, it would be reasonable to shoot back with your own gun.”
    ― The Dalai Lama, Seattle Times, May 2001

  12. #12
    Boolit Buddy veeman's Avatar
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    When I am looking for a new load, I load no more than 5 rounds at a time per powder, any more than that is wasting powder and bullets. Really only 3 is needed. I like what I see, 5 more of that powder increased by .5 grain until I find what is best. Then, when best load is found, load lots of them and practice. That's how I do it anyway.

  13. #13
    Boolit Grand Master

    Wayne Smith's Avatar
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    Be aware that IMR3031 has been the go to powder for the 30-30 for years and years. You might consider it for your next purchase.
    Wayne the Shrink

    There is no 'right' that requires me to work for you or you to work for me!

  14. #14
    Boolit Master

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wayne Smith View Post
    Be aware that IMR3031 has been the go to powder for the 30-30 for years and years. You might consider it for your next purchase.
    I started loading 30/30's in the 60's and haven't found a better powder yet.
    Without the dark night, you would never see the bright stars...

    You can live forever if you give up all of the things that make it worthwhile.

    Why a .45...Because they don't make a .46!

  15. #15
    All good advice.!++

  16. #16
    Boolit Master


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    Quote Originally Posted by veeman View Post
    When I am looking for a new load, I load no more than 5 rounds at a time per powder, any more than that is wasting powder and bullets. Really only 3 is needed. I like what I see, 5 more of that powder increased by .5 grain until I find what is best. Then, when best load is found, load lots of them and practice. That's how I do it anyway.
    After having done this for a few decades that is my protocol as well. Three shots will not tell you if you have an accurate load but it will tell you if the load sucks. If the load is grouping I fire the other one or two. Then I will take the best load and load enough to fire three or four 5 shot groups to confirm. It takes a while as I let the barrel cool. I have a chronograph and never use it. SD does not matter if the load shoots. I am too lazy to set it up and I can guess the velocity close enough for my needs. 100 fps is not going to make or break a load for me. I start slightly under mid load and work up in .3-.5 intervals depending on the cartridge.

    But I only hunt with jacketed bullets and that is why so few shots are needed to find a load. My cast bullets are not as consistent. For plinking with cast, I shoot 5 shot groups and then go with 10 shot groups to confirm.

    This is likely not "the best" way to do it. I looked at the "ladder" system of load development and it might be better. But I like to KISS.

    Like others have suggested, do not load 100 of one load. You might get lucky, but the odds are not with you.
    Don Verna

    NRA Endowment Member

  17. #17
    Boolit Master




    EMC45's Avatar
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    Trimming brass is my most hated aspect of reloading.
    You can miss fast & you can miss a lot, but only hits count.

  18. #18
    Boolit Master

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    I agree with most of the advice given above. On the 30-30 I don't want my shoulders pushed back any during sizing. I would suggest getting a Lee collet neck sizing die and you may never have to trim brass again.
    Good luck with your loads!
    Rick

  19. #19
    Boolit Buddy
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    Your fingers got sore, I have arthritis in my hands. 1. Buy the Lyman case prep tool with the longer brass handle. The items for case mouth chamfering/deburring and primer pocket reaming are included. It's much easier to use than the short Wilson tools from my younger days. 2. The cheap Lee trimmers can be used with a small cordless drill to turn the cases. Get the trimmer holder with the wooden ball for the handle. 3. Buy shell holders with the beveled edges at the entrance side. The sharp edged ones will actually make holes in your thumb if the session is long.

  20. #20
    Boolit Master
    Tom W.'s Avatar
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    I have better results putting primers in on the press for some reason. This is for my rifles. My handguns ain't as picky and I'll use the RCBS primer tool for them, both lp and sp. Maybe it's just me, maybe the firing pins are shorter on the rifles.....
    Tom
    μολὼν λαβέ


    Did I ever mention that I hate to trim brass?

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Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check