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Thread: Sucker for a cheap project

  1. #1
    Boolit Master

    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    2,655

    Sucker for a cheap project

    Yes, I guess I am. So here's the story: $25 for a junker of an old Marlin 60, missing parts such as the trigger/trigger guard assembly, front sight, buttplate, various screws, a lot of finish (ugly old gun). $10 for a trigger assembly, most of the other small parts and pieces from my box of old junk gun stuff. $35 total, a lot of elbow grease cleaning and refinishing, and a little oil for the stock and paint for the metal.

    I need another .22 rifle like a need a hole in the head, but I can't seem to pass up a cheap project, especially one that isn't terribly involved.

  2. #2
    Boolit Master

    Winger Ed.'s Avatar
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    May 2007
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    When the neighbor stops by and sees me working on some odd project, that I need to do about as much as a hog needs a hip pocket.
    I tell him I need to do something that'll keep me out of those crooked BINGO parlors.
    Everyone can learn from their mistakes.
    However; it's less painful, and cheaper to learn from the mistakes of others.

    Old age and treachery will always overcome youth, and skill.

    OK folks. Enough of this idle chit chat. This ain't no retirement home.
    EVERYONE!!
    Back to your oars. The Captain wants to waterski.

  3. #3
    Boolit Grand Master tazman's Avatar
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    At least with this rifle, when you finish, you have something of value and very useful. Better than spending the money and time at a bar.

  4. #4
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
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    I'm also a sucker for old junker projects, I actually finish about 5% of them, and save the rest for old age projects. My kids are going to cuss their old man when they have to line up my auction !

  5. #5
    Boolit Man
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    Jul 2019
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    Boston, Kentucky, USA
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    I am working on a junker project myself. Was digging through my parts pile and came up with 2 type 99 Arisakas, one complete, the other is just the receiver and complete bolt. One complete Mauser 1894 Brazilian action, one unknown 1893 action, and a complete 1895 action with 28 Gauge EDM'ed on the receiver ring (interesting). All will be used to build rifles at some time or other. And yes I know the strength limitations of these small ring Mausers.
    The one that I am currently working on is a Large ring Mauser 98 with Nazi proofs all over it BYF42 dated, mis-matched bolt, and all other parts from cans, boxes, bags, crates, etc. The trigger guard is ugly, but I can reshape that into a quite acceptable looking unit. Barrel is a 23 1/4" 8x57 VZ24 with issue sights and a cherry bore. Couldn't bring myself to drill and tap this receiver for a scope. Will low forge bolt handle to sporter configuration.
    I was busy last night to midnight trying to sand some of the ugly from the Turkish (K.Kale) stock that I'm going to use. It'll have to be bedded as the action/stock fit is casual at best. Anyway I think it will make a good knockaround rifle suitable for kayaking or going on nature walks.
    Anyone know any good way of removing embedded gun oil/cosmoline from wood? My way usually involves heat to remove as much as possible, then washing with lacquer thinner. Smelly and somewhat dangerous, but gives very good results but I'm trying to get away from that method.
    NRA Life 1992
    My avatar is almost a dead ringer for my little buddy Chico. Six pounds of mean that thought he was a Pit Bull. Miss that little guy.

  6. #6
    Boolit Buddy
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
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    Someday when the kids are grown I'd like to pick up and polish up old .22s, maybe even get an FFL and sell them. Not for what my time is worth but to keep some old but good guns of dying from neglect and ignorance.
    "There are no solutions there are only tradeoffs" ~ Thomas Sowell

  7. #7
    Boolit Grand Master Texas by God's Avatar
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    A Marlin 60 is worth fixing most every time. They are one of the greats.

  8. #8
    Boolit Master uscra112's Avatar
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    My failing is pre-WW1 single shot "boys' rifles". I must have at least two dozen now. Some have new barrels, some are relined, some have lovingly been given the full London oil finish on the wood, all the Favorites have new link pins to tighten them up. Converting .32 rimfires to .32 Long Colt CF has become something of a specialty. Good hobby for an old man who can't walk out 100 yards and back to set targets anymore. All testing is done at 25 yards in the back yard.

    BTW all but one of the "new barrels" are actually repurposed Model 60 barrels. Set back and given a Lilja competition chamber they are almost as accurate as my "real" target .22s.
    flectere si nequeo superos, acheronta movebo

  9. #9
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Arizona
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    I bought several old Single shots that needed refurbishing so I could rebuild them for testing my 22lr reloads.
    They turned out to be very accurate shooters.
    Now I don't want to sell them.
    I think I will keep them for Squirrel hunting

  10. #10
    Boolit Master uscra112's Avatar
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    The Stevens 44 and Favorites are particularly good. Stevens made guns to a price, but they never skimped on their barrels. And the motion of the Stevens breechblock on closing will crowd the cartridge into a tight chamber just like the target-grade bolt guns do. Their Model 417 (circa 1930s) was quite competitive with Winchester and Remington bolt guns, but lost out only because working the underlever was too difficult in the prone position.
    flectere si nequeo superos, acheronta movebo

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Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check