Titan ReloadingWidenersMidSouth Shooters SupplyADvertise here
RotoMetals2Lee PrecisionInline FabricationRepackbox

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 49

Thread: Winter is coming; like to see some good chili recipes

  1. #21
    Boolit Master

    gwpercle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Baton Rouge, Louisiana
    Posts
    4,866
    Quote Originally Posted by Newboy View Post
    note: masa harina ain't corn meal!

    And, there is no controversy concerning beans ... there is just the wrong way and the proper way!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    What is Masa Harina , corn flour ?
    Beans...what is the wrong way and what is the proper way .

    Sent from my desk top computer using two fingers .
    Gary
    Certified Cajun
    Proud Member of The Basket of Deplorables

  2. #22
    Boolit Buddy Sam Casey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Great Lakes
    Posts
    196
    I can’t imagine chili w/o beans, but it must be a “Texas” thing. Can’t argue what is best in minds of many looking thru the SW chili contest winners. No matter; appreciate all the recipes and will tweak my own accordingly and report the results.

  3. #23
    Boolit Master

    Winger Ed.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    The Republic of Texas
    Posts
    1,344
    Quote Originally Posted by gwpercle View Post
    What is Masa Harina , corn flour ?
    Beans...what is the wrong way and what is the proper way .Gary
    Masa Harina is sort of like cornmeal made from hominy.
    Its ground up corn, but like hominy, its been soaked/treated with lime water.
    That's why corn tortillas and tamales look like cornmeal, but taste different.

    Of the real Mexicans I know, they use dried pinto beans, maybe a little garlic & salt, then slow boil them until they're pretty soft.
    (They are actually kind of bland.)
    To convert them into ranch style beans---- add chili powder.
    For refried beans- take the well cooked pinto beans and do them like ya would to make mashed potatoes.
    For bean dip-- add/season the refried beans with canned chilies and maybe some more garlic and/or onion.
    Last edited by Winger Ed.; 10-20-2019 at 06:32 PM.
    Everyone can learn from their mistakes.
    However; it's less painful, and cheaper to learn from the mistakes of others.

    Old age and treachery will always overcome youth, and skill.

    OK folks. Enough of this idle chit chat. This ain't no retirement home.
    EVERYONE!!
    Back to your oars. The Captain wants to waterski.

  4. #24
    Boolit Master Reverend Al's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Victoria, B.C., Canada
    Posts
    1,748
    This might ruffle a few feathers, but I'll post it anyway!



    White Chile

    1 pound chicken cut into ” cubes
    1 medium onion, chopped
    1 teaspoon garlic powder
    2-3 tablespoons oil

    Salute chicken, onion, garlic powder, and oil in a large saucepan. Cook until the chicken is no longer pink.

    Add the following ingredients and simmer uncovered for about 30 minutes:

    2 cans Great Northern Beans, rinsed and drained
    1 can chicken broth
    1 can (4 oz.) chopped mild green chilies
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon cumin
    1 teaspoon dried oregano
    teaspoon pepper

    Add the following ingredients and stir well:

    1 cup sour cream
    cup Half & Half

    If you like things HOT add:

    1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
    I may have passed my "Best Before" date, but I haven't reached my "Expiry" date!

  5. #25
    Boolit Mold frumplepigskin's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    southern Indiana
    Posts
    8
    It amazes me so many completely different dishes all called the same thing. All probably very good.

  6. #26
    Boolit Master

    Winger Ed.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    The Republic of Texas
    Posts
    1,344
    Quote Originally Posted by frumplepigskin View Post
    It amazes me so many completely different dishes all called the same thing. All probably very good.
    Yeah.
    It's evolved into some sort of inclusive generic term like 'cake', 'casserole', 'hot sauce', or 'cookies'.

    However; 'all probably very good' might be a bit of a stretch, or open for debate.
    For example, whip yourself up some Baltimore chili.
    Last edited by Winger Ed.; 10-21-2019 at 03:37 AM.
    Everyone can learn from their mistakes.
    However; it's less painful, and cheaper to learn from the mistakes of others.

    Old age and treachery will always overcome youth, and skill.

    OK folks. Enough of this idle chit chat. This ain't no retirement home.
    EVERYONE!!
    Back to your oars. The Captain wants to waterski.

  7. #27
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    West Tennessee
    Posts
    1,099
    A thread on chili here, is like going on a motorcycle forum and asking, "what's the best oil to use in my abcxyz engine?"!

  8. #28
    Boolit Master bikerbeans's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    1,801
    I think threads on chili, cornbread or bbq should be in "The Pit"!

    BB

  9. #29
    Boolit Master

    gwpercle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Baton Rouge, Louisiana
    Posts
    4,866
    Quote Originally Posted by frumplepigskin View Post
    It amazes me so many completely different dishes all called the same thing. All probably very good.
    It's like asking for a "Gumbo" recipe...everyone has one , everyone's is different and by and large each person's recipe usually makes a good Gumbo !

    Gary
    Certified Cajun
    Proud Member of The Basket of Deplorables

  10. #30
    Boolit Master

    gbrown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    S.E. Texas
    Posts
    1,219
    Quote Originally Posted by gwpercle View Post
    It's like asking for a "Gumbo" recipe...everyone has one , everyone's is different and by and large each person's recipe usually makes a good Gumbo !

    Gary
    Ain't it the truth. I've been fed about a hundred different dishes called gumbo or chili, and none came close to what is served in this house.
    One of my father's favorite statements: "If I say a chicken dips snuff, look under his wing for the snuffbox" How I was raised, who I am.

  11. #31
    Boolit Buddy Sam Casey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Great Lakes
    Posts
    196
    If it is that good, let’s see it.

  12. #32
    Boolit Master

    gwpercle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Baton Rouge, Louisiana
    Posts
    4,866
    Quote Originally Posted by gbrown View Post
    Ain't it the truth. I've been fed about a hundred different dishes called gumbo or chili, and none came close to what is served in this house.
    Last night...at my house... it was a gumbo with Chicken , Andouille , chicken gizzards , chicken hearts , okra and file' powder ...you not going to find that gumbo in any recipe book or restaurant !

    Home cookin is de best !
    Gary
    Certified Cajun
    Proud Member of The Basket of Deplorables

  13. #33
    Boolit Master

    gbrown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    S.E. Texas
    Posts
    1,219
    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Casey View Post
    If it is that good, let’s see it.
    If you are referring to my post, I'm not bragging on our cooking, I'm referring to the number of variations of each dish. Our recipes are quite simple, but we don't stray from the basics. I've been fed stuff like the "Baltimore chili" and ground meat and tomato sauce that people call chili, plus about 50 other variations from what Tex-Mex chili is. I've been served rice and chicken with some veggies that was passed off as gumbo, plus a bunch more that wasn't gumbo as I know it. gwpercle and Reverend Al have some great recipes. I was mobilized and sent to Alexandria, Va for a year, and never could find a place that knew how to cook Tex-mex food. What they tried to pass off was a far cry from it.
    Last edited by gbrown; 10-25-2019 at 01:35 PM. Reason: Additional info
    One of my father's favorite statements: "If I say a chicken dips snuff, look under his wing for the snuffbox" How I was raised, who I am.

  14. #34
    Boolit Mold
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    South Alabama
    Posts
    24
    I gave up on what looks like canned chili 20 years ago and settled on a chili stew.

    Start with about 24 dried red chili peppers, open to remove the stems and seeds.
    Keep some of the seeds if you want heat. More seeds = more heat.
    Toss the peppers (and some seeds?) in a stew pot over low heat with maybe an inch of water to reconstitute them.
    Set aside to cool after 30-45 mins.
    Now scrape the 'meat' of the pepper off the skins with a tablespoon.
    Toss the skins and add that 'meat' to a blender with the water you had in the stew pot.
    Use enough of the water and add more as needed to get what looks like a thin ketchup.
    20-24 peppers usually gives me about a blender full of the consistency I like.

    That is the base I use for making chili. After that it's all personal preference. But think stew, not chili. With this base you don't need any tomatoes, cumin, or chili powders. The mixture in the blender tastes like chili should, because that's all that's in it. It's just chili peppers and water, and will be thick enough that you don't need the masa flour. I add cut up beef, not ground beef, preferably sirloin, browned with onions. I like potatoes in mine, and plenty of them. Carrots are also a good addition and add some color. Lastly, season to taste with sea salt and black pepper. I leave the kidney beans in the pantry. Cut the meat, potatoes, and whatever else you add to a size you're happy with. I've been meaning to try this with pork shoulder (country style ribs) but haven't gotten around to it yet. I have used venison as well.

  15. #35
    Boolit Master Tenbender's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Southwest Virginia Mountains
    Posts
    724
    Quote Originally Posted by reverend al View Post
    homestead chili

    1tb vinegar
    1tb ground cumin
    1/3-1/2 c chili powder
    1tb salt
    1 medium onion, finely chopped
    28 oz fine diced tomatos
    1 tsp pepper
    10oz beer
    2 beef bullion cubes
    2lbs coarse ground or diced beef, venison or your meat of choice
    1tb minced garlic
    1tsp oregano
    1tb mesa (corn) flour
    1/2 cup water

    2tsp chipotle chili powder *
    1/2tsp hot sauce*
    1/2tsp cayenne pepper*

    in a large bowl combine beef, onions and garlic. In a dutch oven or stockpot brown beef. Add all remaining ingredients except mesa and 1/2 cup water. Stir until well blended. Simmer covered for 2 hours stirring occasionally.

    1/2 hour before time to eat combine mesa and 1/2 cup water and mix well, add to chili and stir. This is where you want to add beans if you want to use them.

    Ingredients with a * after them should be left out for mild chili, all 3 of them will increase the spiciness, if you want it even spicier then increase the cayenne pepper and hot sauce or change its type to a hotter one.
    :d:d

    :d:d

  16. #36
    Boolit Grand Master






    Lloyd Smale's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    munising Michigan
    Posts
    15,171
    I make it easy

    2 large cans of tomato sauce
    2 small cans of tomato paste
    1 large can stewed tomatoes
    2 large onions chopped (I like bigger pieces)
    1 can chilli beans
    1 can pinto beans
    2 packs dry taco seasoning or chilli seasoning (its about the same anyway)
    about 3lbs of course ground (mandatory) venison
    1 teaspoon crushed red pepper
    chilli powder to taste.
    you can add more of about any of it to taste.
    Soldier of God, sixgun junky, Retired electrical lineman. My office was a 100 feet in the air, closer to God the better

  17. #37
    Boolit Master Reverend Al's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Victoria, B.C., Canada
    Posts
    1,748
    Johnny Cash Original Chili

    2 pound ground venison or ground beef
    1 pound venison steaks or sirloin
    2 large sweet onions
    3 clove garlic
    2 tablespoon canola oil
    3 (16-ounce) cans whole tomatoes
    2 large green bell peppers
    5 jalapeno peppers, diced, to taste
    1 habanero pepper, to taste
    2 packet McCormick mild chili seasoning
    salt and black pepper
    1/2 cup chili powder (New Mexico chili powder, if available)
    1/3 cup cumin
    1 tablespoon sage
    1 1/2 teaspoon oregano
    1 tablespoon cayenne pepper
    2 (15-ounce) cans black beans
    2 (15-ounce) cans pinto beans
    2 (15-ounce) cans kidney beans
    1 (15-ounce) can chili beans
    1 (12-ounce) bottle beer
    1/4 cup sugar
    1/4 cup self-rising cornmeal, about a handful


    Chop the steak into medium pieces. Finely chop the onion and garlic. In a Swiss Diamond stock pot, heat the oil over medium-high heat. Brown the steak in the oil in batches, draining off some of the fat if necessary. Remove from the heat and set aside.

    In a Swiss Diamond skillet, brown the ground meat over medium-high heat. Drain off the fat and set aside. With the oil remaining in the pot, brown half the onions and garlic over medium heat until they are caramelized. Now add the well-drained ground beef and steak. Stir and heat it all up. Add the tomatoes, bell peppers, hot peppers (if using), and the remainder of the onions and garlic. Heat to a brisk simmer, stirring often.

    Now it's time for the spices. Put in the McCormick chili packets, followed by the salt and black pepper, chili powder, cumin, sage, oregano, and cayenne pepper. This is the time to begin tasting your chili. Once the taste is to your liking, drain the cans of beans and add to the mixture. Now taste again, as you will likely want to add some more spices because the beans mellow their flavor. Once the chili tastes right, pour in the bottle of beer. Stir well. Cover and simmer for at least 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add sugar to taste, but be careful not to use too much. Chili becomes something else entirely if too sweet.

    Simmer, covered, for at least another 30 minutes, making sure to stir so it does not burn. Now grab that handful of cornmeal, uncover the chili, and stir it in.

    Notes: John Carter Cash says, "Follow the recipe exactly, and you will get a good pot of chili. Change it to suit your own taste, and you will have a marvelous pot of chili." Johnny Cash was famed for his homemade chili recipe featured in the USO cookbook. Cash, an Air Force veteran, used to tour various bases, putting on 7-8 shows daily for the service women and men.
    I may have passed my "Best Before" date, but I haven't reached my "Expiry" date!

  18. #38
    Boolit Master Reverend Al's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Victoria, B.C., Canada
    Posts
    1,748
    And then of course ...

    Mama Cash's Cornbread

    1 1/2 cups cornmeal, self-rising
    1 1/2 cups flour, self-rising
    1 1/2 tablespoons sugar
    1 teaspoon of salt
    2 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
    2 eggs
    2 3/4 cups buttermilk
    1 onion, chopped
    1/2 cup butter, melted

    Mix cornmeal, flour, sugar, salt, and baking powder while humming. Add eggs, buttermilk, and chopped onions. Pour the mixture into a skillet; pour yourself a beer or two. Bake the cornbread batter at 350-375 for around one hour.

    Without stumbling, take the skillet out of the oven. Pour melted butter atop the cornbread (careful!)

    Let cornbread and yourself sit for ten long minutes.

    (Originally made by Johnny Cash's mother)
    I may have passed my "Best Before" date, but I haven't reached my "Expiry" date!

  19. #39
    Vendor Sponsor

    Smoke4320's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Right here ..at least I was a minute ago
    Posts
    4,386
    you start with a white walker and a little dire wolf and......
    I carry a Nuke50 because cleaning up the mess is Silly !!

    http://www.bing.com/search?q=nuke50&...7ADE&FORM=QBLH

    Selling Hi Quality Powdercoating Powder

    PULSAR night vision and thermal dealer !!!
    PM me for a good deal

    I am not crazy my mom had me tested

    Theres a fine line between genius and crazy .. I'm that line
    and depending on the day I might just step over that line !!!

  20. #40
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    West Tennessee
    Posts
    1,099
    Well, we had the big "annual chili cook off" at work today. I've been so disgruntled with the results in the past that I threatened a boycott. I tried in vain to get someone else in my department to make chili, after all it's a fund raiser for our humanity fund. None would step up to the plate, so I said, " don't expect much, I'm going to throw something into a crock pot and bring it! ".

    Here it is.

    2 large cans of Bushes chili beans
    1 can of kidney beans
    1 pack of McCormick Mexican chili seasoning
    1 pack of burrito seasoning
    1 one can of chopped green chilies
    1 tbsp of Mexican chili powder
    1 1/2 lb browned ground pork
    1 pound ground beef patties chopped
    1/2 cup sugar
    1/4 cup salt
    1 tbsp black pepper
    1 stick of butter
    And lastly, 25 chopped fresh habnero peppers straight from the garden!

    I ment for it to be a tonsil torching chili straight from hell!

    How it works.
    You buy a ticket, taste all the entries you care to, and vote for your favorite. I knew mine was a success when someone announced, "Holy moly! That number eight is hotter than blue blazes! ".
    I figured at the end of the cook off, I'd be bringing 2/3 a crock of hotter n hell chili back home, can it, and use a pint at a time as a chili starter for a new batch. I couldn't believe my eyes when it was nearly all consumed! I'll admit it had a good flavor profile, but a head pounding slow burn that hit all the way to your belly button! I guess you never know? It was ment to be more of a joke than a serious entry.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check