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Thread: Redding Profile Crimp die with 38 Spl

  1. #1
    Boolit Buddy
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    Redding Profile Crimp die with 38 Spl

    I just received my Redding Profile Crimp Die fir 38/357. Once I adjust the die to touch an empty case, I lower the ram and do one complete turn of the die downwards and then start crimping loaded rounds. The crimp does not seem too significant with just one turn.

    How much do you crimp with this die?

    My Lee Taper Crimp die seems to do just as good of a job. The Lee taper die provides a modified taper crimp.

  2. #2
    Boolit Grand Master Outpost75's Avatar
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    Die is adjustable. With light contact it produces a taper crimp in varying degrees, depending upon adjustment.

    Turned down more the die produces a roll crimp, which is VERY substantial if die body contacts shell holder and you haven't trimmed cases!
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  3. #3
    Boolit Grand Master
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    Hi-Speed, a crimp die is one of the easiest dies to set up.

    Start with a bullet seated in the casing to the desired depth. With the crimp die turned out so that it doesn't crimp at all, raise the ram to the top of the stroke. With the ram all the way up and a casing with a bullet properly seated - Screw the crimp die down until you just feel it touch the mouth of the casing.

    Lower the ram, turn the die down a little bit more (maybe 1/8 of a turn? ) and raise the ram fully.
    Check the amount of crimp. If there's not enough crimp, screw the die down some more and try again. Repeat until you get the amount of crimp you desire. When you get it where you want it, lock the die in place with the lock ring. DONE.

    All of the instructions about this many turns and that many turns; are all crap. You simply adjust the crimp die until you get the amount of crimp you desire. If you want more crimp you screw the die down farther. If you want less crimp, you back the die out some. There is a tendency to over-think this stuff sometimes.

    For semi-auto pistol cartridges that headspace on the case mouth, use a taper crimp.
    For straight walled revolver cartridges, use a roll crimp. The amount of crimp varies with the application but I try not to over work the brass. Some applications require a heavy crimp (magnum cartridges, slow burning powders, etc.). Some applications just need enough crimp to remove the flare and hold the bullet in place (like HBWC).

    I FAR prefer to seat and crimp in separate operations because it gives you much more control over the operations.

  4. #4
    Boolit Buddy
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    Yes, that is exactly the way I’ve been doing it for decades, just not too impressed with the Redding over either the RCBS, Lee FCD and Lee taper dies. I have adjusted my Lee taper die where I have no creep in my J frame Airweights with 158 gr SWC +P loadings...

  5. #5
    Boolit Master Wheelguns 1961's Avatar
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    The redding profile crimp die really shines with heavy recoiling magnum rounds like the .454 casull.
    Due to the price of primers, warning shots will no longer be given!

  6. #6
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    Keep turning it down. I look for the die to start to put a roll crimp on the loaded round a d keep adding crimp until I'm satisfied, then lock it down. On my PCD's, I can see where the die touches the sides of the cases around the bullet too.

    I use a Redding PCD for 357, 44, 45 Colt, and 454 Casull. I can really tell it works with the heavies in the 454.

  7. #7
    Boolit Grand Master
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    Yep, keep turning it down until it rolls the case mouth into the crimp groove of the bullet. There's a short taper crimp lead on the Redding die and then a roll crimp profile after that.

    You don't need to crush the case mouth into the bullet, you just need to set the case mouth into the crimp groove of the bullet.

  8. #8
    Boolit Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wheelguns 1961 View Post
    The redding profile crimp die really shines with heavy recoiling magnum rounds like the .454 casull.
    +1 on that. I use redding profile crimp dies on anything larger than a 44 mag. With one exception for the 44 mag, anything that's full magnum to be fired in my 329pd. Scandium frames with full loads are very good at pulling bullets. Outside of these special applications standard dies have worked well for me.

    Ebner

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by ebner glocken View Post
    +1 on that. I use redding profile crimp dies on anything larger than a 44 mag. With one exception for the 44 mag, anything that's full magnum to be fired in my 329pd. Scandium frames with full loads are very good at pulling bullets. Outside of these special applications standard dies have worked well for me.

    Ebner
    I've never fired one of the S&W Scandium frames. I'm sure you are correct on them being hand held bullet pullers.

  10. #10
    Boolit Buddy
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    Thank you everyone, I initially believed that the die would provide a nice roll crimp after a complete turn of the die in the press. It needs to be brought down further as you all stated. Learning curve.

  11. #11
    Boolit Master
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    Don't be too concerned with how the crimp looks. It will take some experimentation, but turn the die in just enough to prevent bullet movement under recoil and no more. Try the load in the lightest weight, hardest kicking .38 Special gun you have, like an S&W snubnose airweight. If there is zero bullet movement, your taper / profile crimp is fine. The minimal crimp will probably provide best accuracy, though there may be instances where you have to tighten the crimp slightly.

  12. #12
    Boolit Grand Master
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    lotech - I agree completely.

    It seems to be easy to get all wrapped around the axle when it comes to the crimping operation. It's not that complicated.

    With the exception of some ball powders and magnum loadings that require a heavy crimp to give consistent ignition, the only goal of the crimp is to hold the bullet in place.

    The 38 Special is one of the most forgiving cartridges on the planet when it comes to reloading.

    Flaring the case mouth to start the bullet seating and then roll crimping after seating will work harden the brass and shorten case life. I try to keep both of those operations (flaring and crimping) to a minimum. Applying just enough flare to get the bullet started in the case (A Lyman "M" die profile works very well with cast bullets) and then applying just enough crimp to remove the flare and hold the bullet in place is all you really need or want.

    I get a LOT of reloading cycles out of my 38 Special brass but I try not to overwork the brass.

    When using a straight walled revolver cartridge (like he 38 Special) and a cast bullet with a crimp groove, the goal is to crimp enough to remove the flare and roll the case mouth into the crimp groove enough to reliably hold the bullet in place.
    When using a rimless semi-auto cartridge (like a 9mm Luger) just enough taper crimp to hold the bullet in place is the goal.

    With revolver cartridges the tendency is for the bullet to be pulled from the case by the recoil of the prior rounds fired in the cylinder.
    With semi-auto pistol cartridges the tendency is for the bullet to recede into the case during the loading cycle.
    The goal in both of those scenarios is to prevent the bullet from moving in relation to the casing prior to being fired.

  13. #13
    Boolit Master TNsailorman's Avatar
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    Good comments and the only thing I would add is that if you want consistent crimps you need to do 2 things. First and foremost you need to trim all your cases to the same length. Otherwise each case will have a different crimp. Second is to separate brass according to thickness(manufacturer) which is the same problem as the first but usually not as critical. I am talking both straight wall and bottleneck cases here. The higher pressure you run, the more critical the need for these two. my experience anyway, james

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