RepackboxWidenersLee PrecisionRotoMetals2
Titan ReloadingMidSouth Shooters SupplyADvertise hereInline Fabrication

Donate Now Goal amount for this year: 6000 USD, Received: 6135 USD (102%)
OUR GOAL HAS BEEN MET!
Our Annual server fund drive is going on now! This donation drive helps fund Cast Boolits for an entire year, and helps support our 2nd amendment rights! You can donate by Paypal by clicking the DONATE button. Or by Cash / Check / MO to the address below:

Willy Snyder
PO Box 2732
Pocatello, ID 83206
****Due to overwhelming e-mails, I will be very slow in updating this list. Please bear with me!****


Results 1 to 20 of 20

Thread: first M1 carbine one more question

  1. #1
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Ala.
    Posts
    624

    first M1 carbine one more question

    What method should I use to decock this gun when I store it. Should I snap it, leave it cocked, do the make 30 carbine snap caps?- guess I can answer that last part myself with Google.

  2. #2
    Boolit Master

    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Way up in the Cascades
    Posts
    2,874
    Assuming the carbine is unloaded and going to be stored for awhile I just snap it. I do not have a snap cap, but they do make them. If it's not snapped, then the hammer spring is compressed needlessly. But, to be perfectly honest in my opinion, I doubt very much if there is any practical difference, as like most US military guns the carbine is a very stout animal and forgiving of misuse. Consider that when carried in combat it is likely cocked with the safety on, perhaps for days and even months at a time. I keep one for a home defense gun, have for years, and it's been cocked for years with periodic maintenance at which time it is snapped several times to assure function. No deterioration of firing ability has been noted. I might add that the presence of a snap cap in a chamber for extended periods might not be desirable under humid storage conditions.

    So -- your choice, really. I'm not sure there is a right or wrong to leaving the gun cocked, but I personally snap them for storage.

    DG

  3. #3
    Boolit Grand Master Outpost75's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    over the hill, out in the woods and far away
    Posts
    7,121
    ^^^This^^^

    Same here. Hornady .309" diameter 90-grain XTP with 7.4 grains of AutoComp, about 1650 fps, cycles well, drops the brass at your feet, and is devastating varmint load.
    Last edited by Outpost75; 07-29-2019 at 05:35 PM.
    The ENEMY is listening.
    HE wants to know what YOU know.
    Keep it to yourself.

  4. #4
    Boolit Grand Master


    Larry Gibson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Lake Havasu City, Arizona
    Posts
    17,359
    + another on the 90 gr Hornady XTP for varmint and SD with the 30 Carbine I load them over 15 gr H110 for 2151 fps out of my M1 Carbine with excellent accuracy.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	90 XTP.jpg 
Views:	10 
Size:	47.8 KB 
ID:	245966
    Larry Gibson

    “Deficient observation is merely a form of ignorance and responsible for the many morbid notions and foolish ideas prevailing.”
    ― Nikola Tesla

  5. #5
    Boolit Master

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    N. E. Ohio
    Posts
    1,150
    To avoid damage, just pull the slide back about half an inch then pull the trigger. The hammer will hit the rear of the bolt, but not the firing pin. The carbine was designed to not fire if the bolt was not completely closed so it wouldn't slam fire.

  6. #6
    Boolit Buddy jeepvet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Beautiful Central Texas
    Posts
    137
    On all of my rifles I just hold the trigger as I close the bolt. That releases the firing pin without dry firing on most rifles. I have read all kinds of stuff from "DON'T EVER DRY FIRE" to "practice all you want by dry firing". Personally, I don't think that an occasional dry fire will hurt much, but I will not make a frequent practice of it. And I will Never dry fire someone else's rifle without permission. However, unless I am keeping the firearm loaded for defense purposes, I do not store it with the hammer spring under tension.

    By the way, I have an Upland M1 and a Universal commercial M1 and I LOVE them both. Very fun to shoot and great accuracy. I have taken many a white tail doe at less than 100 yds with a neck shot using Sierra's 110gr Varminter HP bullet over IMR 2400. It has been so long that I don't remember the load right off, but if you are interested I will look it up for you.
    Last edited by jeepvet; 07-29-2019 at 06:28 PM.
    "Nothing is more uncommon than common sense." Benjamin Franklin

  7. #7
    Boolit Master
    lefty o's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    1,974
    it doesnt need to be "decocked". springs do not wear out by being left in a compressed state.

  8. #8
    Boolit Master

    avogunner's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Northern Va
    Posts
    565
    Quote Originally Posted by jimb16 View Post
    To avoid damage, just pull the slide back about half an inch then pull the trigger. The hammer will hit the rear of the bolt, but not the firing pin....
    This has been my practice for as long as I’ve owned my 1943 Inland - over 40 years.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  9. #9
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Ala.
    Posts
    624
    Thanks for the responses guys. I was always told by my father not to dry fire guns. In my bolt guns, I hold the trigger down while closing the bolt, and that does it. Didn't work on this gun. I will probably shoot it a bunch getting it sighted in (and just 'cause I want to) then pull it out every now and then for fun. So I will use the 1/2 in retraction of the bolt trick to make me feel better when I put it away for awhile.

  10. #10
    Boolit Master

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    N. E. Ohio
    Posts
    1,150
    Holding the trigger while closing the bolt doesn't work because the trigger/sear doesn't reset until the bolt closes. Its not like a bolt action/cock on closing rifle or pistol. You can do the same hammer drop on the m1 Garand as you can on the carbine.

  11. #11
    Boolit Master


    Walks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    1,481
    I never worried about it as a kid. Still don't, 60+yrs later.

    But if you want to practice by dry firing, then buy snap caps or make them.
    I HATE auto-correct


    Happiness is a Warm GUN & more ammo to shoot in it.

    My Experience and My Opinion, are just that, Mine.

  12. #12
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Space Coast, FL
    Posts
    1,528
    Pulling the op rod to 70-80% rear with index finger holding op rod. As you are easing it forward (op rod RH finger) left hand is holding weapon and rapidly pulling trigger, you will feel hammer release and contact bolt and then slide into battery, works the same on M1 Garand. The dog leg design firing pin is to contact the receiver bridge retracting pin as bolt rotates into battery to prevent inertia firing.

  13. #13
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    825
    Instead of a snap cap I use a fired case and leave it . I also favor the Lyman 311410 cast. It comes out at 130 grain and functions perfectly.
    jim

  14. #14
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Ala.
    Posts
    624
    that 311410 is plain base isn't it? I have the mold I think. Tried it in my Blackhawk but not for long. Does it work well in the rifle even tho it's got no gc?

  15. #15
    Boolit Grand Master


    Larry Gibson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Lake Havasu City, Arizona
    Posts
    17,359
    I've had M1 Carbines since the mid '60s and am US Army depot level armorer school trained in their repair. It does not hurt to dry fire them. Dry firing them (and other US made military rifles) is done extensively in training, system check and maintenance and is/has always been a common practice. Yes, there are some firearms that should not be dry fired as they may be damaged......the M1 Carbine is not one of them.
    Last edited by Larry Gibson; 08-02-2019 at 10:31 PM.
    Larry Gibson

    “Deficient observation is merely a form of ignorance and responsible for the many morbid notions and foolish ideas prevailing.”
    ― Nikola Tesla

  16. #16
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    825
    t-bird yes it does and no gc makes it cheap to shoot.
    jim

  17. #17
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Ala.
    Posts
    624
    kj are you running it full tilt?

  18. #18
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Ala.
    Posts
    624
    thanks Larry, I've read that and it's nice to hear it from someone that I respect their opinion.

  19. #19
    Boolit Master

    Winger Ed.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    The Republic of Texas
    Posts
    1,050
    In the Service, we dryfired hundreds and hundreds of times before we got live ammunition,
    as had the folks who had the same rifles before us.

    I'd heard the dry fire issue is with rim fire firing pins getting dinged up from dry firing,
    and guns with 2 piece firing pins like some revolvers. If the spring fails that retracts the floating part of the pin, it could cause a jam.

    I never heard of that actually happening, but dinging up the end of a rim fire's pin makes sense.
    That's probably what got the whole dry fire issue going.
    Everyone can learn from their mistakes.
    However; it's less painful, and cheaper to learn from the mistakes of others.


    Old age and treachery will always overcome youth, and skill.

  20. #20
    Boolit Master
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Ala.
    Posts
    624
    Yeah, I never knew why not dry fire, I just was told not to by my Dad for a lot of years (not continually). I just figured it had something to do with the pin not being supported by a primer on impact by the hammer repeatedly. I don't know That's why I asked. I have snap caps for my shotguns.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check