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Thread: Dremel type tools and how I have used them

  1. #21
    Boolit Master Traffer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GregLaROCHE View Post
    I’ve been getting ready to buy my first one. There are so many different brands, types and kits out there, it’s hard to know where to start and with which tools. How about shank size?

    Any advice on this will be greatly appreciated. Thanks
    You probably don't want to use cheap stuff like me but if you do... In the price range of $30 to $40 I have not found anything better than a Black & Decker RTX. You can generally find them for about $35. As far as the attachments, bits etc., Be prepared to spend 20X the amount of money OR MORE if you buy stuff in stores. Like I stated in the video, I get the diamond wheels for about 20 cents per. Things like a pack of resin cut off wheels ...Dremel Brand- $8 to $10, Same thing but not branded on eBay from China $1.75. And there are lots of types of burrs and such that are not available except online. But like most folks here you probably have a few hundred to spend on this stuff. If so ignore everything I have written.

  2. #22
    Boolit Master Traffer's Avatar
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    I bought a rotozip thinking the same thing...it sits. Too bulky and can't turn down the speed enough.

  3. #23
    Definitely get the cable extension. It gives you complete control of the tool.

  4. #24
    Boolit Master

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    One thing I always do when using any stone or craytex wheel is to true them with a dressing stone before using them, not only do they not try to bounce around and will cut faster but they actually last longer despite the fact some of the tool material gets removed during the dressing process. An out-of-round or off center mounted spinning wheel that is bouncing, even very slightly, is not going to be in contact with the work for the entire revolution thus it will cut slower and since it is not cutting evenly all the way around it gets even more lop-sided with use and literately beats itself to death. Another benefit is a much better finish and better accuracy in tight spots, I know it's common to do this and most folks probably already do it but a lot of others just chuck up a wheel and have at it!
    Statistics show that criminals commit fewer crimes after they have been shot

  5. #25
    Boolit Master
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    I don't have a Dremel but I do have a Foredom which is a hopped up Dremel. It has a small motor (about 1/8 hp)with a flex shaft then a pop off round tool head with a built in drill chuck. It uses tools with shafts up to about 3/16" and uses a variable foot feed for speeds from 0 to 14,000 rpm. I built a holder to use it on my 7x14 mini lathe as a tool post grinder . I have 3 tool heads for it so I can switch heads when it gets hot from extended use or if I'm switching back and forth with different grinding tools just switch tool head with a different bit in it. It's a lot more expensive than a Dremel but I got it used at a pawn shop about 30 years ago for $35. Very handy tool.

  6. #26
    Boolit Grand Master

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    Dressing the stones, rawhides felt bobs and even the nylon brushes (lightly) does several things to improve the tools. It trues them making them run true to the spindle. It helps to balance them removing shake and vibration for a smoother more controllable cut. Dressing breaks down the bonding agent between the abrasive opening the pores and sharpening the dulled abrasives. It only takes enough to true the stones and sharpen them, a light dressing every so often in use helps a lot.
    Another thing to remember is if the stone is loading up the bond / abrasive is to hard and not breaking down Hence the point isn't staying sharp. If the stone is breaking down to fast then the bond / abrasive is to soft while its staying sharp and clean its excessive wear is the problem. You will see the difference when dressing them.
    A small dressing stick is a big help in doing good work with these tools.

  7. #27
    Boolit Master
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    And if you use the burrs on wood stocks,try it out on a scrap of wood the same type as the stock. Start at less than full speed or even less to get a feel as to how it cuts. Have a variable speed one and if at full speed it is very to loose control and really screws up the wood. Think there is a kinda sweet rpm spot with the burrs and if too fast or too heavy a cut easy to actually burn one up. When I did a bunch of tool bits for my 6" lathe the standard length was too long.
    cut in half roughed the cutting angles. Then I got smart and ground the both ends then cut in half. Was in Lowes today and checked the selection and they seem to have a good variety. Only have the Lowe's in town. No Home Depot. Still ticked off about Lowe's taking on Sears/Craftsman as Kobalt used to be their house brand. Think Kobalt is/are better tools. Frank

  8. #28
    Boolit Master Drm50's Avatar
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    I have several Dremils, a couple Rotozips and a small Bosch router. I ruin Dremils all the time by using them on jobs that put to much stress on side play. I had a rechargable that was handy for light polishing but battery crapped out and I pitched it. I lucked into a small high speed Die Grinder at a yard sale. It is twice as big as a Dremil but shaped so you can one hand it. It has a weird 3/16" keyed chuck. The problem with it is buying tools for it. It will take Dremil tools but the off brand Chinese wire wheels and stones can fly apart from RPMs. I do use a Rotozip to power flex shaft. I put 3 steel doors in a building and by the time I cut the steel frames for strike plates and dead bolts the tool was shot. It was a Master Mechanic brand from Tru Value HWD, $19.95.
    I just chalk it up as the cost of doing business. I also have adapted worn blades for a Fien vibrating type tool to sand inside of forearms and polish in actions. I use cut off wheels in Dremil to cut the blades to desired width and super glue the abrasive on them.

  9. #29
    Boolit Master


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    I’m looking at a Dremel 4000. Does anyone have one? Is it a good one to buy?

  10. #30
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    I have never bought a Dremel brand rotary tool. From the looks of them in the stores, they run about double the price of equally made units. BUT I HAVE NEVER USED ONE. I have a Ryobi HT20VSK and and 3 or 4 Black & Decker RTX models. I have also tried the Harbor Freight 110V corded units that look similar to the RTX.
    I am financially challenged so I don't even try the ones that cost more than $35. I believe the Ryobi is over $35 but it was given to me. The RTX is not heavy duty but the motor is considerably more powerful than the Ryobi and the HF unit is complete garbage. When I took my HF unit back I demonstrated that their littl 12V (with a converter) that sells for $6.99 and is about 1/4 the size has more power than their 110V unit.
    The RTX shortcomings are. 1) the bearings are poor. Even brand new you have to get used to the run out on the bearings. And as I use them exclusively on steel and carbide, when grinding dust gets in them they die quick. I make collars from pipe cleaners that keep the grinding dust out of the front bearings. That makes them last about 3 times longer. 2) they cannot be rebuilt. I managed to rebuild one but would advise against trying. I had to fabricate the new brushes and cut rivets to get the motor apart to do it. 3) they heat up quick.
    The good of the RTX is the power (adequate for what I do) The PRICE is $35. (in my budget). AND contrary to the button on the tool which says 3 speeds, they are VARIABLE SPEED. I don't know why but they have a variable speed selector that they put detents in at 3 positions. I often set them between the positions...no problem.
    The Ryobi was given to me and it looks great, has pretty good bearings, but is so under powered as to render it useless. I suspect that many brands out there are similar with the inadequate power. Probably why people stay away from them. If I would have only tried the Ryobi and the HF units, I would have given up on rotary tools all together.
    My advise would be to try to get the sellers to let you try them before you buy. Put them through a real test. If they start smoking or die in your hands, at least you didn't pay for it.
    PS I also got a one of those new Walmart brand units for about $30... Died in one day! It was death due to lack of power.

  11. #31
    Boolit Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by GregLaROCHE View Post
    I’m looking at a Dremel 4000. Does anyone have one? Is it a good one to buy?
    I burned up about 3 or 4 of them and then I tried my roto zip and that was that. No new dremels anymore. I will pick up one at a pawn shop if it is reasonable enough. I also use laminate trimmers, regular type routers and plunge routers. I love making wood chips!!
    Look twice, shoot once.

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