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Thread: Marlin 1894 44mag

  1. #21
    Boolit Master MGySgt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lar45 View Post
    A good friend told me his trick to break in/polishing new barrels. Clean it first, then run 50 dry patches on a tight Jag and scrub the barrel till it shines. Pay particular attention to the throat and lead.
    Lar45 - if I was going to do that I would use JB Bore Paste. I have cleaned rifles before with JB's and it worked great. Not sure if would get the burnishing that firing and cleaning would get.
    Big Bore = 45+

  2. #22
    Boolit Buddy
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    Quote Originally Posted by Texas by God View Post
    My suggestion is to just shoot the burrs and boogers out of it. WAY more fun than cleaning.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk
    Here, here!
    I second that motion.

  3. #23
    Boolit Master Kev18's Avatar
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    Do you still have the safety on the rifle? I took mine off and replaced it with a saddle ring. It looked like cancer so I took it off... And I also buffed out the nasty WARNING on the barrel. I bought it back a few years ago when I really wanted a .44 mag lever gun for some reason. Since then iv'e started collecting original lever guns from the 19th century. So I really couldnt care less what happens to that one. I beat it in the bush and use it as a walking when need be.

    I paid it quite alot, but I guess Im just not as attached to newer models.

  4. #24
    Boolit Master MGySgt's Avatar
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    Yes the safety is still on it, and the warning label went with the old barrel. The only marking on the barrel is '44 Mag', and it looks laser engraved vice stamped or rolled - no constriction.

    More about the safety. I tend to like the safety when it is cold and raining out, keeps from an accidental discharge when lowering the hammer on a live round. As soon as I let the hammer down and pull it back to half cock, I take the safety back off.

    A long time ago I was deer huntig in Pa with my BIL and my 15 year old niece was letting the hammer down on a 30-30 when her thumb slipped. No one was hurt but my BIL had to go home and change his shorts as the round hit the ground a few inches from his feet. That was the last time that rifle went hunting, it went down the road the next day and he bought a Mossberg that had the safety.
    Big Bore = 45+

  5. #25
    Boolit Master Kev18's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MGySgt View Post
    Yes the safety is still on it, and the warning label went with the old barrel. The only marking on the barrel is '44 Mag', and it looks laser engraved vice stamped or rolled - no constriction.

    More about the safety. I tend to like the safety when it is cold and raining out, keeps from an accidental discharge when lowering the hammer on a live round. As soon as I let the hammer down and pull it back to half cock, I take the safety back off.

    A long time ago I was deer huntig in Pa with my BIL and my 15 year old niece was letting the hammer down on a 30-30 when her thumb slipped. No one was hurt but my BIL had to go home and change his shorts as the round hit the ground a few inches from his feet. That was the last time that rifle went hunting, it went down the road the next day and he bought a Mossberg that had the safety.
    The rifle never malfunctioned. it was her fault that she let it slip. I can see how it could be hard for 15 year old especially if the hands are wet and cold.

  6. #26
    Boolit Master MGySgt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kev18 View Post
    The rifle never malfunctioned. it was her fault that she let it slip. I can see how it could be hard for 15 year old especially if the hands are wet and cold.
    Correct - the rifle did not malfunction, her thumb slipped letting the hammer down and yes it was cold and wet. My BIL did not blame her for the accidential discharge EXCEPT the rifle should have been pointed in a different direction - she did get a toungh lashing for that. But my BIL did not want something like that to happen again.

    I have 3 marlins, 2 - 1895 45/70 and this 1894. 2 of them have the safety and I do use the safeties on them.
    Big Bore = 45+

  7. #27
    Boolit Master
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    I'd shoot it first and see what results you get. You may already be home free - wouldn't that be nice. You didn't mention whether the rifling is broached, buttoned, cut or hammer forged. If it's button rifling or hammer forged, the bore should be slick as a whistle and break-in will go quickly. Broached or cut rifling generally has some degree of unavoidable burrs or wire edges and benefits from their removal. On even new barrels which show reamer marks across the lands, I'll shoot a few finishing lapping rounds to get the lines all running parallel to bullet travel, not necessarily completely removing them. If they're not loading up with copper or lead and it cleans easily, there's no point in it.

    On freshed-out cut-rifled muzzleloaders, we would wrap fine steel wool around an old bore brush until it fit very tightly. Might have to pull it in from the chamber end. Once in the bore, saturate it with motor oil and stroke the full length of the bore (sticking out a bit on each end on each stroke) for 50 - 100 strokes. This will burnish the bore surface and smooth up the edges of the lands where burrs are usually found. It does not remove material other than the nitnoids that are sticking out and shouldn't be there. Use a rod guide to keep the rod from rubbing on the rifling at the muzzle. One can be made from a .35 Rem or similar case with the primer pocket drilled out for the rod diameter if you don't have one. The case neck will slip into the muzzle and protect the bore from rod wear. A chamber-stop for the brush can be made from a fired cartridge case 1/3 to 1/2 full of lead. When chambered, this will allow the brush to protrude a bit beyond the rifling on the breech end without falling out or abusing the bolt face.

  8. #28
    Boolit Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by yeahbub View Post
    I'd shoot it first and see what results you get. You may already be home free - wouldn't that be nice. You didn't mention whether the rifling is broached, buttoned, cut or hammer forged. If it's button rifling or hammer forged, the bore should be slick as a whistle and break-in will go quickly. Broached or cut rifling generally has some degree of unavoidable burrs or wire edges and benefits from their removal. On even new barrels which show reamer marks across the lands, I'll shoot a few finishing lapping rounds to get the lines all running parallel to bullet travel, not necessarily completely removing them. If they're not loading up with copper or lead and it cleans easily, there's no point in it.

    On freshed-out cut-rifled muzzleloaders, we would wrap fine steel wool around an old bore brush until it fit very tightly. Might have to pull it in from the chamber end. Once in the bore, saturate it with motor oil and stroke the full length of the bore (sticking out a bit on each end on each stroke) for 50 - 100 strokes. This will burnish the bore surface and smooth up the edges of the lands where burrs are usually found. It does not remove material other than the nitnoids that are sticking out and shouldn't be there. Use a rod guide to keep the rod from rubbing on the rifling at the muzzle. One can be made from a .35 Rem or similar case with the primer pocket drilled out for the rod diameter if you don't have one. The case neck will slip into the muzzle and protect the bore from rod wear. A chamber-stop for the brush can be made from a fired cartridge case 1/3 to 1/2 full of lead. When chambered, this will allow the brush to protrude a bit beyond the rifling on the breech end without falling out or abusing the bolt face.
    Good info. Thanks

  9. #29
    Boolit Master MGySgt's Avatar
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    Today I finished up the shoot/clean, 1 shot for 10 rounds then 2 rounds for 20 rounds then 5 rounds for 20 rounds. The cleaning got easier as I went along, didn't expect much in the accuracy department as it was just a load thrown together with Unique and Hornady 180 HP's, did ok but nothing spectcular.

    Tonight after dinner, I am going to take my hunting rounds down and see what they do. MM-275gr GC backed with 2400. We shall see what happens after I zerro the scope. (use a scope for load development and also see how the gun actually groups).

    I still don't know what sighting system I am going to use on it. Appeture, Red Dot or scope. The scope that is currently on it will not stay on it Leopold 2-7 VX3.
    Big Bore = 45+

  10. #30
    Boolit Master MGySgt's Avatar
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    Didn't get a chance to go down to the range last night, Grand Daughter was here last night. Spent time with her (she is 6).

    I did go down today, but instead of taking my hunting load (with gas check) I took some NOW 255 PB SWC with a medium load of unique.

    Qjit after 15 rounds as I could not see my dot (1 in) on my target and could no longer group them, should have put another target up but due to the length of the round I had to single load them through the ejection port. 15 rounds should give me an idea if it was going to lead.

    No leading - push a tight dry patch through the barrel - no sticking/feel of leading, no lead on the patch. 3 more dry tight patches and only got lude and powder residue. Barrel looked good.

    Tomorrow with a little bit of luck I will put some heaver loads through it with the same boolit. If they don't lead - I believe this barrel is good to go.

    By the way - I had moved the beench back to 50 yards. First 5 rounds was a 4 round cluster touching and 1 round to the left less that an inch out - now tht was out of a squeaky clean barrel that had a patch run through it with Break free on it. I think this barrel is going to shoot!!!
    Big Bore = 45+

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Abbreviations used in Reloading

BP Bronze Point IMR Improved Military Rifle PTD Pointed
BR Bench Rest M Magnum RN Round Nose
BT Boat Tail PL Power-Lokt SP Soft Point
C Compressed Charge PR Primer SPCL Soft Point "Core-Lokt"
HP Hollow Point PSPCL Pointed Soft Point "Core Lokt" C.O.L. Cartridge Overall Length
PSP Pointed Soft Point Spz Spitzer Point SBT Spitzer Boat Tail
LRN Lead Round Nose LWC Lead Wad Cutter LSWC Lead Semi Wad Cutter
GC Gas Check