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Thread: Hard White Metal Silver Plate - alloy

  1. #21
    Boolit Master
    Traffer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Traffer View Post
    "...cast boolits look like chromed steel and alloy contains nobium"
    Now I am envious. I want chromed steel looking boolits. And nobium in my alloy.
    And OH,
    By the way ...sisu
    AKA hans.pcguy

  2. #22
    Boolit Buddy
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    Quote Originally Posted by Petander View Post
    I had my alloy tested because coatings didn't stick,no zn but some niobium instead. And copper.

    It sizzles very little bubbles and very slowly but the alloy changes to much darker colour overnight. I use 30% HCL. My cast boolits look like chromed steel and stay like that for years. After HCL soak they are much darker and coat very well.

    Attachment 235871
    Niobium eh? I have never encountered an alloy containing that, spare for some superconductor stuff. Where did you source that from?
    Also those are strange looking boolits, what are they for and how did you make them?

    You've got a whole lotta strange going on there.

  3. #23
    Boolit Buddy Ginsing's Avatar
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    Those are fragmenting shotgun slugs.

  4. #24
    Boolit Master Petander's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peregrine View Post
    Niobium eh? I have never encountered an alloy containing that, spare for some superconductor stuff. Where did you source that from?
    Also those are strange looking boolits, what are they for and how did you make them?

    You've got a whole lotta strange going on there.
    I mixed a ton of alloy some 15 years ago, WW & monotype. Made big 10% and 30% ingots. It's pretty high antimony content with 4% tin. But it doesn't coat well.

    Slugs,yeah. A Svarog mould.

    Click image for larger version. 

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  5. #25
    Boolit Master
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    For those who are interested in these slugs, I found this:https://youtu.be/5s2D_8ufCJM
    AKA hans.pcguy

  6. #26
    Boolit Master Drm50's Avatar
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    I worked in a Marx Toy plant back in 60s when toy guns were still popular. They had large injection moulds that
    had pots built in them for White Metal. One of my jobs was to keep pots up to level by adding ingots. This stuff had high percentage of zinc. I wasn't involved in tech aspects and the metal was used as shipped. They did check shipments and refused some metal because it didn't meet the properties they needed for casting. The problem metal had to much zinc content and wouldn't fill out the finer detail in the mold.

  7. #27
    Boolit Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drm50 View Post
    I worked in a Marx Toy plant back in 60s when toy guns were still popular. They had large injection moulds that
    had pots built in them for White Metal. One of my jobs was to keep pots up to level by adding ingots. This stuff had high percentage of zinc. I wasn't involved in tech aspects and the metal was used as shipped. They did check shipments and refused some metal because it didn't meet the properties they needed for casting. The problem metal had to much zinc content and wouldn't fill out the finer detail in the mold.
    They used to call "pot metal, white metal, spelter etc.," all the same metal. It was very easy to mold. The auto industry used to make carburetors with it. And yes it was mostly zinc. They threw everything in a big pot and what came out was "pot metal". Until Carter started using aluminum. The famous Carter "AFB" was aluminum. "Aluminum Four Barrel".
    AKA hans.pcguy

  8. #28
    Boolit Master Petander's Avatar
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    Nowadays it's easy to find out. Here is mine:

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    $20 for peace of mind.

  9. #29
    Boolit Master RogerDat's Avatar
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    There is "Pewter" which is stamped and falls within known parameters for its alloy content. Can vary a bit depending on age, use, source country etc. but will fall within a fairly distinct range of known alloy metals. Mostly tin, antimony, copper in varying amounts, with older (pre. 1970's) potentially having lead. Lead may also be in items not coming into contact with food or body. I think I have had some picture frames that had a lead content. Stamping was just the letters to spell out pewter, have also had some that didn't say pewter and tested out at 88% tin but with some lead so... Yes separate batches are a good thing. The stuff from Asia and Holland has all seemed to be higher tin content in my own experience. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pewter

    Then there are other items such as silver plate stamped EPBM (Elctro Plated Britannia Metal) which similar to pewter, very high tin but having it's own alloy metals and percentages to warrant that EPBM designation rather than being designated as just pewter even if it is essentially a type of pewter. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Britannia_metal

    EPWM (Electro Plated White Metal) has much less information. It seems it is a somewhat generic marking. This little blurb what I found in article on identification of silver as different from silver plate.

    White Metal Marks
    White metal contains no silver. It was developed as an inexpensive silver and silver plate substitute with the advantage that it does not tarnish. Usually the alloy consists of 60% copper, 20% zinc and 20% nickel. Nickel silver is used as the base metal in higher quality silver plated flatware. The advantage is that the metal is harder, less mailable and wear spots are not as noticeable as on brass or copper. Typical white metal marks are as follows:
    https://2.thesilverwareguy.com/silve...e-stamp-marks/

    However in modern usage "white metal" may well be a high tin alloy.
    https://contenti.com/pewter-casting-...and-tin-alloys

    I actually have some ingots that look like that. I bought them because they had no tarnish, hit with a propane torch they melted like tin so... one of my better days of scrounging I must say.

    Bottom line there is always a risk in silver plate of getting the zinc alloy "white metal". One quick check might be how easy is it to bend? I would expect that a copper, zinc, and nickel core will be hard and stiff, while the tin based white metal would be easy to bend at the edges. So for me... if the price and weight of the item meant I would buy it if tin based white metal I would try bending an edge with my thumb. If it bends buy, if doesn't bend then no harm and I just put it back. My candy dish passed that test so it came home with me.
    Je suis Charlie
    Scrap.... because all the really pithy and emphatic four letter words were taken and we had to describe this way of getting casting material somehow.
    Feedback page http://castboolits.gunloads.com/show...light=RogerDat I do trade a bit from time to time.

  10. #30
    Boolit Buddy
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    I went on a mini pewter scavenging expedition, not my usual fruitful route, and paid special attention to peices marked as white metal (E.P.W.M). All of them upon careful examination were dead easy tells for being pewter, I only ended up buying one because the price wasn't quite right on the rest of them but I was pretty sure the composition was high tin and very similar to pewter on all of them.

    I think that if you stick to serviceware and use some discretion you'll find good mainly tin alloys. Other trinkets, you may get into potentially questionable alloys, but quality serviceware is a good bet.

    Here's my hoard for today (okay the pitcher was earlier this week, but it's a solid 1lb 12oz for $6), the tray (?) is the one marked white metal. Very obviously mainly tin.





    Here's my secondary collection of pewter here at the moment, some is nicer and i'm not melting it. This is in addition to my primary stash where I do my melting, all the really good stuff i'd never melt at dream of melting at my parents, the quaternary hoard I have in my car, and like 50 pounds in ingots.









    Here's a fun one, I have two like this (other one without a dent but has an engraving). I know this is a Christian forum, can I be banned for posting pictures of pewter?








    Also you can see me reflected in one of the bowl, hello!
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  11. #31
    Boolit Master
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    I got some really cheap pewter at the local good will. It is WAAAAYYYYY to nice to melt for stinkin boolits. If it comes to it I will use poorly cast boolits before melting down nice pewter. Once you alloy it, the chances are it will never come out of the lead again. Use range lead there is enough tin in it.
    AKA hans.pcguy

  12. #32
    Boolit Master
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    I would melt the one with the porn on it. That is not fine work at all.
    AKA hans.pcguy

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